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For new grads that started at 100k+


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For new grads that started at 100k+, what are you making now? Its not that uncommon to see a new grad making 100k+ and Im curious to know what these grads end up making after ~5 years. Do you just steadly work your way up to ~120k and then get capped?

 

It seems to me that a new grad that starts at ~80k has a lot more insentive to work their way up because they can potentially make a lot more. If you are already at 100k+ whats the incentive?

 

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No new grads in my state would make near 100K as starting, even with residency.

Maybe this happens on the east coast.............

I am 25 yrs in and making near the ceiling of what corporate medicine will provide in my department and it is only about $125K.

If you start high and don't have profit sharing or production reconciliation you will price yourself out in a hurry and have nowhere to go.

We tend to learn to live to the extent we have and going backwards is painful.

I would rather have excellent benefits and an average pay.................

 

My two cents.

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No new grads in my state would make near 100K as starting, even with residency.

Maybe this happens on the east coast.............

I am 25 yrs in and making near the ceiling of what corporate medicine will provide in my department and it is only about $125K.

If you start high and don't have profit sharing or production reconciliation you will price yourself out in a hurry and have nowhere to go.

We tend to learn to live to the extent we have and going backwards is painful.

I would rather have excellent benefits and an average pay.................

 

My two cents.

What state?

 

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For new grads that started at 100k+, what are you making now? Its not that uncommon to see a new grad making 100k+ and Im curious to know what these grads end up making after ~5 years. Do you just steadly work your way up to ~120k and then get capped?

 

It seems to me that a new grad that starts at ~80k has a lot more insentive to work their way up because they can potentially make a lot more. If you are already at 100k+ whats the incentive?

This is a really weird question. If someone offered you 125k now with no raise ever, or 80k now and annual raises up to a max of 125k, you would take the latter?

 

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For new grads that started at 100k+, what are you making now? Its not that uncommon to see a new grad making 100k+ and Im curious to know what these grads end up making after ~5 years. Do you just steadly work your way up to ~120k and then get capped?

 

It seems to me that a new grad that starts at ~80k has a lot more insentive to work their way up because they can potentially make a lot more. If you are already at 100k+ whats the incentive?

And, when you start using hammers, you may smash your thumb a few times giving you an incentive to learn how to use the hammer without smashing your thumb. I'd rather start out by not smashing my thumb. I don't need the incentive. Cinntsp should appreciate this.

 

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This is a really weird question. If someone offered you 125k now with no raise ever, or 80k now and annual raises up to a max of 125k, you would take the latter?

 

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I would take the former, with an iron clad contract,  because I'm not a new grad, and set to retire in 6 years.  Would maximize the income  (of course, I suppose taxes would take a lot of it!!!).  

 

I've gone backwards in salary with my now 6 month old position, but closer to home and have a retirement and employer matching program that was not available at the former job.  Crappy health insurance.  There will be trade-offs to every job change.  

 

New grads in my system start out at $100,000 and so do  seasoned PA/NPs.  No credit given for experience.  Sweet for the new grads. 

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Interesting EMEDPA.......... I will have to look into it.

New grads who have contacted me on the East Side of the Cascades haven't been offered more than $85K in most areas.

Corporate Medicine has ceilings in their calculations - so, no matter how long you have been out - there is a stopping point.

Private Ortho pays the best in my town with baseline salary and then reconciliations every 3 months and payouts based on billings - you pay some overhead but are treated like the docs and a revenue producing provider responsible for keeping the lights on. The motto is "eat what you kill"

 

GOOD health insurance is a must for me and nice bennies make it better. 

 

I am going down to 32 hours a week and taking an overall paycut but not a cut in hourly wage. My choice. I am tired................

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Maybe I've just been lucky, but I've gotten offers of 100+ both east/west of the Cascades in my state.

 

And this whole "what's the incentive" thing is bull.  If you're capped out at 10 years what's YOUR incentive to work hard at your job?  I guess that once you make whatever you think you're worth you just kinda quite trying?

 

I've heard this argument before in other careers and find it absolutely obnoxious.  Your incentive is the fact that it's your JOB and you want to do right by your patients.

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I took an EM position a year ago right out of school for $90,000 in the midwest.  Decent bennies but pricey insurance. I saw it as a great new grad pay. Now offered a position with inpatient psych for $120,000 with similar bennies. Not bad for only a single year out. There should be no incentive to do your best for your patients based on your wages. You do what you do because you want to care for people...right? The great pay is just icing.

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we can offer a 32 hr week with great benefits, but training is almost non-existent. it's trial by fire and osmosis...

 

Where is this?!?

 

MediMike - not to mention the whole mortgage, college tuition, general day to day expense thing.................

 

Work to live, don't live to work

 

 

I took an EM position a year ago right out of school for $90,000 in the midwest.  Decent bennies but pricey insurance. I saw it as a great new grad pay. Now offered a position with inpatient psych for $120,000 with similar bennies. Not bad for only a single year out. There should be no incentive to do your best for your patients based on your wages. You do what you do because you want to care for people...right? The great pay is just icing.

 

Man reading these salaries I feel like I'm really getting shortchanged here. I'm making $90k in FP at 3 years out. I also live a terrible area saturation-wise.

 

Regarding "incentive", I got into the PA profession knowing I'd probably cap out at $125k give or take, maybe more if I do some niche per diem work. We do not have scalable earning potential, and until we lose our dependent provider status we never will.

 

That said, I'm a 'work to live' guy and I don't think medicine is all that and a bag of chips. I like what I do most days, but not enough to do ONLY this for the rest of my working life. My ultimate goal is to be a part time PA while my main focus is other entrepreneurial ventures.

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I took an EM position a year ago right out of school for $90,000 in the midwest.  Decent bennies but pricey insurance. I saw it as a great new grad pay. Now offered a position with inpatient psych for $120,000 with similar bennies. Not bad for only a single year out. There should be no incentive to do your best for your patients based on your wages. You do what you do because you want to care for people...right? The great pay is just icing.

 

Thats decent but I recently learned that psych doctors make like ~$165/hr which compes out to ~300k a year. A significant number of psych docs (like 40 percent) work part time cuz the money is so good. PAs in psych should make atleast half the doc's salary.

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also the thing about working in psych is that, well, all your patients are psych patients....you need to factor that into the equation. while I see a LOT of psych stuff in the ER. I would not want to do it full time. Bless those who can. I just don't think I am cut out for that.

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Thats decent but I recently learned that psych doctors make like ~$165/hr which compes out to ~300k a year. A significant number of psych docs (like 40 percent) work part time cuz the money is so good. PAs in psych should make atleast half the doc's salary.

 

I think you might be a little off in your expectations for salary a year out of school dude.  As nice as it would be for PAs to make equivalent salaries on a scale like that, it's not the way the industry works.  I think it's a more than decent salary for a year out.

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I think you might be a little off in your expectations for salary a year out of school dude.  As nice as it would be for PAs to make equivalent salaries on a scale like that, it's not the way the industry works.  I think it's a more than decent salary for a year out.

agree- the only place you will see a PA making 1/2 what a doc does is in family medicine....maybe....most specialty PAs make 1/5 to 1/3 what the docs they work with make, and the PAs frequently work a lot more hours and significantly more nights/weekends/holidays.

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I agree guys. I don't think you can assume a PA should make half of what the doc is making. Never ever heard of any real correlation between the two. I'm coming from a EM position so I've seen my share of psych patients as well EMED. I just enjoy getting deep into what some of their issues are. We all know that's impossible in a fast paced ER. 

I think FP is fairly low paying in my area starting around $70,000. Of course this includes evenings as well as Saturday clinic.

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I think FP is fairly low paying in my area starting around $70,000. Of course this includes evenings as well as Saturday clinic.

 

Ouch.  Unacceptable and unsustainable for the profession.  

 

Although I know I may be a little spoiled sitting up here in the PNW, that is simply an insulting offer.

I think you're going to be sitting pretty with your pay and specialty.  

As EM said, I'm just happy someone has the patience to do it!

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Ouch. Unacceptable and unsustainable for the profession.

 

Although I know I may be a little spoiled sitting up here in the PNW, that is simply an insulting offer.

I think you're going to be sitting pretty with your pay and specialty.

As EM said, I'm just happy someone has the patience to do it!

From what I can tell these lowball salaries are coming from states and areas that are saturated with PAs... Specifically, PA schools. See NY/PA/Northeast US/Florida

 

The positive is that many new grad PAs are fleeing to the PNW and Deep South (Dallas, Austin, SA, Houston) for higher salaries and better benefits. I know of a school in NY that recently graduated 40+ and over half the class (almost 30) migrated away for first job. The only ones that stayed had immediate obligations to area from family. Is this the trend? Probably.

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