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It was a warm summer day in 1997 when my best friend Cam and I were running around in the yard playing a game of tag without a care in the world. "Tag! You're it!," as I poked Cam in her arm. She screamed and ran away before she tripped over a stump in the tree. Cam scraped her knee and I consoled her while helping her over to sit on the porch. I concocted a "healing" recipe of dandelions and other assorted weeds to spread over her wound, just as I had seen on an episode of Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. As a child, I have always loved to play doctor/nurse. It was not until sophomore year of college when I finally decided to utilize my certified nursing assistant license that I had earned during high school. I did not expect to gain so much knowledge when I accepted a job in the memory care unit of an assisted living facility. Every day I would care for the elderly residents who had dementia, Alzheimer's, and other diseases. A lot of the residents did not have any family to visit them even on holidays; evidence of sad cases of "granny dumping." Seeing the residents on a regular basis helped me develop a relationship with them as if they were all my own grandparents. I learned their likes and dislikes as well as got a glimpse into their youth whenever they would reminsice about their days. Gloria, the mean resident as other CNAs would call her, was once a college student at Duke University. She would always ask me for directions to different buildings on the Duke campus and I would play along with her. Often times she refused to eat during dinner, so I would offer her a hot cup of plain black coffee. One day she grinned with the biggest smile and unexpectedly told me,  "You're going to be a great doctor." Those words struck a cord in me and I keep replaying her words whenever I felt exhausted after studying for multiple exams in one week.  After a year of working there, I decided to leave the job because of schedule conflict with school but would always think about my residents and how they are doing. I was a lost college student prior to this job, but after caring for the residents and seeing how they can live a happy life at the end of the stage of Alzheimer's with the help of compassionate caretakers, I knew that being in the health care field is for me. This is when I decided that I really needed to raise my GPA by changing my study habits and making life changes. My grades suffered during the first couple of years of college because I was immature, did not have real motivation, nor the proper study habits needed to excel in difficult science courses. However, the added motivation to become a physician assistant from my job helped me prepare for better grades. I knew that I had to  work really hard and make sacrifices to prove that I could understand and excel in the pre-requisites. After working in various settings as a CNA, medication aide, and sitter in assisted living facilities and hospital, I encountered many physician assistants and saw their responsibilities on a daily basis. I am continually fascinated by the medical realm and look at the physician assistants with admiration whenever they visit patients and help them feel better when they prescribe medications that work.  I did consider nursing before college, but after working as a CNA, I did not feel like it was what I wanted to do. I like the idea of being able to prescribe medicine, order labs, and have the autonomy with a higher level of care. I first heard of the PA profession during high school from a teacher who suggested that I should consider this field because it would suit me well.  I want to work on the medical side of the health care field, yet I like the idea of having a superivising physician to be there whenever I had questions. Working with a team of doctors, nurses, physical therapists, and other health professionals to help a patient heal is what I envision myself doing forever. I have taken the many pre-requisites in a short amount of time to prepare myself for the rigor of PA school. I believe that I have the experience and determination to do whatever it takes to become a PA. The relationship that I had developed with  Gloria and other patients, I hope, was mutually enriching. Gloria has shown me what it feels like to change someone's life with patience and compassion.  Just as Cam and Gloria felt better after I helped them, I want to use my knowledge as a physician assistant to help patients and bring a smile to their face.
 

Have not reached 5,000 characters so I still have room for more information

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After reading this, I have no idea why you want to be a PA... you mention doctor and nurse several times, but barely even touch on PA, and when you do, it's at the very end of the PS and not very inspiring.  The PS should be entirely about wanting to be a PA - why, how you've prepared, what you know about the profession, and what you will bring to PA school and the profession.  You have the space, so use it!  Also, please, please, please seperate the paragraphs so it's easier to read.  After you re-work your content, I would recommend having someone go over grammer/tenses and help you with those corrections.  Keep at it and remember to show your passion and motivation for wanting to be a PA (it seems like you have some good work experience to write about)!  I look forward to reading your next draft.

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