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Measuring PA productivity

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Does anyone out there have good suggestions for measurement of PA productivity, especially when starting a new practice group? I am part of a new group of critical care PAs at a large academic medical center. We are hoping to expand our group by adding additional coverage with the goal of providing 24/7 coverage for the patients on our service. We are currently integrated with residents. Much of our work is not visible financially, as we do shared visits with the attendings (we are not paid based on RVUs). Much of our daily work is also cross coverage of resident patients. I am trying to provide our administration with some level of objective data of our economic impact. Any relevant studies or insider experience would be greatly appreciated! 

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we track productivity for our em pas on both pts/hr and RVUs/hr.

If a PA sutures a lac or does another procedure on a pt primarily managed by one of the docs they write an independent note and sign the chart in addition to the doc so they get credit for everything they do.

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We write independent notes for our own procedures and bill for those as well. Because we provide a lot of cross coverage, I'm looking for measurements that focus on quality of care rather than RVUs. We've considered looking at financial impact for our ICU as a whole (decreased lab utilization, preventions of catheter associated infections, etc.) but I'm also really interested in looking at quality of care measures that aren't focused solely on finances. 

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This has been an ongoing issue for PAs like yourself. Very tricky indeed. Would love to hear some good input, we have this issue too. "Freeing up the docs" is what we're stuck with outside of the notes and patients everyone knows we saw.

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need to bill for your own procedures

 

no longer be invisible to the billing department - 

 

there is NO other way to demonstrate your worth and show your value

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