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Whats that one thing you love about being a PA and what is it that you hate?


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never having to take ochem or biochem. seriously. it's probably the main reason I became a pa. it wasn't a good reason.

lack of respect and recognition of the profession by both the public at large and many other medical professionals.

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never having to take ochem or biochem. seriously. it's probably the main reason I became a pa. it wasn't a good reason.

lack of respect and recognition of the profession by both the public at large and many other medical professionals.

Interesting. Most schools now require at least organic chemistry 1 if not organic chemistry 2 and biochem.
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Interesting. Most schools now require at least organic chemistry 1 if not organic chemistry 2 and biochem.

almost none of them did 20 years ago. there are still many good programs like U.Wa/Medex that don't. My alma mater (Drexel) still does not, although they have added a genetics requirement since I was there in the early 90s.

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Guest Paula

henryd:

 

this question has been asked over and over.  the same people answer your question over and over.  You can search the site.  No need to keep up your questions.

 

Are you writing  a paper or something?

 

Are you a PA student, a PA, a pre-PA or from SDN? 

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I took biochem 1 and 2, ochem 1 and 2.  Anyway.  Favorite thing: get to help patients, always something interesting to see, do and learn, and am paid a fair wage for it.  Least favorite thing is attendings having superiority and ability to override my decision even if I know the pt better, yet not caring to take time to teach (varies per attending).

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Love: Paycheck

Hate: Patients

Now I've heard doctors say that but not usually PAs. Are you being serious?  If so, there are much more lurcative ways to make money without seeing patients.  In my building I'm surrounded now by "Wealth Managers" where people take other people's retirement money, keep 5% for themselves and invest it in ways that a monkey with a dart gun could do better. Yet they all drive brand new BMWs, Mercedes and etc. They don't like people very much, but love their money.

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I dislike demanding and aggressive patients or folks trying to get drugs from me.

I like making a significant difference in a patient's life that I can see right in front of me. suturing a nasty lip lac, reversing hypoglycemia, cardioverting a pt out of a deadly arrythmia, reducing a shoulder or nursemaids elbow, treating anaphylaxis, etc

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I hear this question a lot. It's fine for someone to ask it but the better way to get the answer for is for you to spend time with PAs at work and get more healthcare experience. What drives some people crazy isn't a big deal to others and vice versa.

 

I've been lucky; I've not been disrespected, probably because (1) an older guy in a white coat is often treated like a physician even when he's not and (2) I don't demand it with my words. I strive to be helpful and competent, traits that physicians, nurses, MAs, and patients alike appreciate.

 

I'm not hung up on my title; I have people call me by my first name. And my attitude is probably different because this is my last career after a lifetime of doing other things. My focus now is on problem-solving and teaching because it won't be long before someone else will be standing where I am now.

 

That said: 

 

Love: Standing alone, several times each day, in a place where I can make a difference. 

 

Don't care for: The state laws can be weird -- the NP I trained can see patients any time but I lose all muscle tone if my supervising physician happens to wander more than 60 minutes from my location. That kind of thing. But I sense a sea change that will hopefully change things. That is, if the men and women who follow start supporting organizations and their elected officials  (AAPA, PAFT, etc) that can make a difference.

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Yeah, this has probably been discussed ad nauseum.  I would only add...well, I'm not a PA but a newly minted NP...that I think practice environment is pretty much everything.  It seems like what a lot of PA's and NP's and MD's and DO's hate is often an issue of where they work (specialty, organization, location, etc.) all of which can be changed.  I feel fortunate (but I reserve the right to change my mind with more experience!) for where I work.  Two MD's, two NP's and we are all treated the same.  I'm in a clinic that is part of a small physician owned group, and even at that, my clinic does there own thing.  When someone calls for an appointment, it's not "Oh well, we don't have a doctor available, BUT/HOWEVER/INSTEAD you can see one of our NP's."  Instead it's, "I can get you in with one of our other providers."  We are treated exactly the same.  Same reserved parking, same bonus system, same benefits, get to hire my own nurses, same budget, same everything except base salary.  I'm in FP and patients (new or otherwise) are not "triaged" to me or an MD. Practice environment makes all the difference.

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Guest Paula

^^^Sounds like a great place to work and a wonderful way to start out as a new NP.  You will do great!!!!

 

You gave me valuable information and I am going to ask how patients are given appointments in my organization.  It's a much larger one than my previous and I've been so busy I don't know what the reception and scheduling staff say when patients call for appointments.

 

 

Small practices have their advantages. 

 

 

Did you forget to add APNP?  LOL!

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    After 35 years as a PA-- I don not have my Masters which is disappointing-- I get frustrated when I see PA's like myself  having to take the Boards every 6 years after doing so 6 times and new PAs take it every 10 years and NP never have to take it again...     Also I am disapointed with the depth of training now--I see midlevel grads with no Internal medicine , derm, cardiology , surgery training...   Salaries are so high now--EVERYONE wants to be a PA -or NP-  and forgot what we do--treat pts....who are sick..   It is true that many PA's out there over 20 years make the same salary as new grads--so be ready everyone to live with this..

 

    Now what I Love about being a PA--appreciation, and   I honestly see something every week --the I have never seen before--so never a dull day...!!!!

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 Also I am disapointed with the depth of training now--I see midlevel grads with no Internal medicine , derm, cardiology , surgery training...   

 

 

Odd statement.  IM and surgery are required for every PA by the ARC-PA.  No getting around it.  Are you saying the skills in these areas are lacking?  

 

Specific Cards or Derm rotations are not a requirement in almost all programs....they are electives.  I'm pretty sure it has always been that way.  We do learn it in didactic as matter of requirement.

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