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Going to PA school because its easier than med


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It seems that this thread has taken a familiar path. There are some very experienced PAs on this forum who articulate very well why people should NOT become a PA. Whether they represent an accurate sample of all PAs is debatable. I didn't run across such dissatisfaction with the profession from the PAs who I shadowed and talked with prior to applying. One reason might be that in person, rather than online, it is harder to be brutally frank and honest about how you feel. Especially when talking to someone who is working hard jumping through all the prerequisite hoops. Maybe the PAs I spoke with just didn't want to discourage me and so didn't share the whole truth regarding the profession.

In an earlier thread I asked the question why should anyone become a PA? The feeling I get from most of the senior PAs on this site is that there are no valid reasons to choose to be a PA. As a career it is only going to lead to frustration due to a lack of scope and respect. Medical school is in reach for most PA applicants. GPA, extracurriculars and LORs are similar for both. The MCAT is the big difference. I've been accepted to a PA program starting in August, however I have started to second guess myself. As a career changer I was hoping that becoming a PA would allow me the satisfaction of working in healthcare for the next 20 or so years. But it seems that may not be realistic and there is a 5-10 year career lifespan before the inherent limitations of being a PA become unbearable.

 

Perhaps being a PA is a career of compromise rather than one of first choice. I have yet to hear a good reason to choose becoming a PA over MD/DO. Are there any? Is it possible to be satisfied as a PA? I'm not sure. I think it would be foolish to ignore the more experienced PAs on here who tell people to go to med school. They have a consistency to their views that speaks loudly.

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Time, and DEBT. And I don't really care about being a doc. My ego doesn't need it either. I've never regretted not going to med school, and I had 5 interviews lined up before I even applied to PA scho

Troll much?

the ideal candidate for pa school in my mind is someone who has been a paramedic, rn, rt, etc for 5-10 years, has a prior bs degree, has settled into their life(maybe married with kids, mortgage, etc)

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This.

 

I have actually ever only seen PA's bitch on here (some on SDN). I know a good number of PA's at a level of candid friendship, and they would share with me if they hated the work, and wished they had become MD/DO. Nope. Not one of them ever has said that. They love what they do, feel very well compensated for having a masters-level education, and really value that they get to do the kind of work they do at the level of training they have.

 

It's PA's like these that make me feel like I won't regret becoming a PA instead of going to medical school (as I am weighing both at this time).

I am happy that I have become a PA. From a medic to nurse to PA, I have enjoyed every stop along the way as well. Would I enjoy being a MD? I am sure I will. However, I have no intention to become one.

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the ideal candidate for pa school in my mind is someone who has been a paramedic, rn, rt, etc for 5-10 years, has a prior bs degree, has settled into their life(maybe married with kids, mortgage, etc) and wants more responsibility in health care, but can't imagine having to move multiple times for medschool and residency, etc . For that hypothetical 35-45 yr old experienced health care provider I think PA is the perfect fit. they already know a lot and they want to take a step up the ladder building on their prior work and life experience.

for a 22 yr old I see zero reason to consider pa. I firmly believe it should be a second health care career, not an entry level, get rich quick degree. apparently most of the profession disagrees with me because programs are consistently now looking for younger individuals with zero to minimal hce. so be it.

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I like being a PA.  I hate the dependent nature of the profession.   Being a PA taught me I had the ability to go to medical school.  Age prohibits it now as by the time I would finish I would be 65 or older.

 

The AAPA will be coming out soon with the Model State Legislation criteria and reportedly there will be big changes recommended, including that PAs are responsible for the care they deliver and that supervision, delegation and dependence is replaced with collaboration in all states. And that we develop our own professional identity by having our own board of medicine ...

 

 

Changes are coming and PAs will have to work long and hard to get their state legislatures to amend the old laws that govern us now. 

 

I am aware of a few cases where the physician was not held responsible for the action of the PA....I believe a case in New Jersey.  There is a case in WI where the physician was initially reprimanded for not "supervising" the PA adequately and then the medical board decided to reverse it.  So there are instances where physicians were not held responsible at all for the PA who supposedly was an "agent" of the physician.  Times are changing and PAs will get to the point where we are a separate and distinct profession not tied to the apron strings of the physician and that is how it should be.

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The AAPA will be coming out soon with the Model State Legislation criteria and reportedly there will be big changes recommended, including that PAs are responsible for the care they deliver and that supervision, delegation and dependence is replaced with collaboration in all states. And that we develop our own professional identity by having our own board of medicine ...

 

 

Changes are coming and PAs will have to work long and hard to get their state legislatures to amend the old laws that govern us now. 

 

 

could you tell me more about this? when is this expected to be here by?

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So if PA school is more intense and not that much shorter than med school then why did you guys choose to become PAs over MD/DOs? The PAs that I have shadowed, particularly in primary care, seem to do the exact same job as the MDs but get paid half the ammount. Why didn't any of you just go to med school, enjoy a less intense curriculum, and end up with a similar job but with more autonomy&money?

 

EMEDPA has said its cuz he wanted to avoid orgo. What about the rest of yall?

 

Time, and DEBT. And I don't really care about being a doc. My ego doesn't need it either. I've never regretted not going to med school, and I had 5 interviews lined up before I even applied to PA school.

 

I think some people should be docs because they just cant hang with the dependent provider role. That's fine. Personally I have enough autonomy in my job. I see my own pts and call my own shots UNLESS I don't know what to do...and then I relish having an SP on site to go to for advice. 

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The problem Didymus is that you don't add balance...just subjective opinion based on speculation and loose association with the practice of medicine...the reason I listed a few of my "gold star achievements" was to lend some credibility to you, who does not know me.  I wouldn't have to be so forthcoming to the likes of andersenpa, E, Primadonna, etc...because they know me and my background...you, however list nothing other than the betrothal to medicine to wit makes not an expert in the field...as far as I can tell you want to be a PA but certainly aren't one, and your use of memes in a thoughtful discussion is outright juvenile...save it for your Snapchat friends...and by the way you're not under the skin of us, you're an ill-informed wannabe that has an opinion...your "information" isn't widely accepted primarily because medicolegal standards vary from state to state...perhaps your online MPH didn't cover that material?

 

Cool story.

 

1. All opinions are subjective.

 

2. I have direct experience in healthcare, as I was the director of a health clinic for several years, and I happen to be married to an attending physician who works as faculty at a large academic center. My wife and I converse in great detail the many facets of healthcare, healthcare delivery, and so on.

 

3. It is possible for one to be informed on the role, scope, and contribution of PA's without having actually been one. For instance, there are experts in WWII history. Probably not one of them actually fought in WWII. Just because they weren't soldiers during, or in, the war does not mean they cannot be experts about it. Me? I'm not even claiming expertise. I'm merely commenting on information that has been observed and learned about over years, from the birds nest, as it were, as a executive healthcare administrator, the spouse of a faculty doctor, personal friend of numerous PA's, PA students, med students, residents, and attending physicians, extensive shadowing experience, and as one who can just go on the internet and simply look all of this stuff up. It's not like being a PA is some mysterious, ethereal pilgrimage that no one who hasn't done it can't possibly understand or informatively comment on.

 

4. Your insults, hubris, and alleged use of sarcasm (though I think you were being serious, only to claim you were being sarcastic once you were called out) in a thoughtful discussion is quite juvenile. But if you take such issue with me using memes (which, historically, are incredibly common in online message boards), I guess you also need to take it up with the more senior members of this forum who also used them in this discussion.

 

5. I don't snapchat. I'm in my thirties.

 

6. You sure have a funny way of showing that I didn't get under your skin. Such as making it seem like that is exactly what happened.

 

7. Is there a state where the medicolegal stipulations on PA's are different than what I cited from AAPA? Are there states where SP's are not held vicariously liable for the acts and omissions of the PA's they supervise? Are there states where PA's can practice without an SP?

 

8. You're right. My masters degree from The George Washington University hasn't covered the nuances of state-by-state physician assistant regulations. We just haven't had time what with the hundreds of pages and countless hours spent covering global healthcare policy, tropical disease management among developing world communities, the US healthcare system, advanced data analysis and epidemiological methods, infectious disease, and domestic and global disaster response. I'll mention to my advisor that they should really have a block on what states offer physician assistants greater scope of practice so that I can seem reputable to some dude online with a chip on his shoulder and insecurities over physicians getting paid more, and having more time for golf, than he does.

 

You took very thoughtful, reasonable, and verifiable responses from myself and, bewilderingly, turned them into a pissing contest. That's how I know I got under your skin. What is so baffling to me is why such responses (that really are representative) were so infuriating for you. All I can think is that they poke holes in a narrative you are adamant about maintaining above all else. Anyway, the thread has gotten back to where it needs to be with the posts that followed your rant. I just couldn't let such ignorance go without a follow-up response. I will not participate further in the derailing of this thread.

 

Onward.

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Time, and DEBT. And I don't really care about being a doc. My ego doesn't need it either. I've never regretted not going to med school, and I had 5 interviews lined up before I even applied to PA school.

 

I think some people should be docs because they just cant hang with the dependent provider role. That's fine. Personally I have enough autonomy in my job. I see my own pts and call my own shots UNLESS I don't know what to do...and then I relish having an SP on site to go to for advice. 

 

Time and debt are the majors reasons I'm considering it over MD/DO right now too. Making decisions for practical reasons such as these is wise. I don't think everyone should pursue the "dream" of becoming a doctor, because it just isn't financially wise for everyone, and for older students such as myself time is a huge factor in deciding what to do.

 

Another great point here is that not everyone cares about being a dependent provider. Some people take issue with this (not being the expert, not having the final say, etc.). For those who don't care that much, being a PA would probably be a great fit.

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the ideal candidate for pa school in my mind is someone who has been a paramedic, rn, rt, etc for 5-10 years, has a prior bs degree, has settled into their life(maybe married with kids, mortgage, etc) and wants more responsibility in health care, but can't imagine having to moI've multiple times for medschool and residency, etc . For that hypothetical 35-45 yr old experienced health care provider I think PA is the perfect fit. they already know a lot and they want to take a step up the ladder building on their prior work and life experience.

for a 22 yr old I see zero reason to consider pa. I firmly believe it should be a second health care career, not an entry level, get rich quick degree. apparently most of the profession disagrees with me because programs are consistently now looking for younger individuals with zero to minimal hce. so be it.

 

As a 22 year old with minimal HCE experience, I chose the PA profession because it had the right balance of independence/dependence, work/life, financial debt/gain for me . To me, I don't want to have such a huge commitment/responsibility to medicine as a doctor, and the level of autonomy is right for me. I also like the option of the lateral mobility, as my interests lay all over the clinical spectrum from orthopedics to dermatology (which are all hugely competitive specialties as an MD that are extremely difficult to get into, compared to a PA).  I've been reading a lot of posts by you, and I just don't get why you're so discouraging of young people who want to be a PA, and not a MD. Sure, young people like me might not have the level of clinical experience as an older applicant - but I feel like with the right level of curiosity/learning mindset, training, perhaps even a residency we can be just as qualified medical providers. 

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lateral mobility is likely going away.

see the thread future of pa started today.

I think folks who know medicine and know what they are getting into should definitely consider pa. I don't think most 22 yr olds fit this description. I think becoming a pa as a first career in medicine at a young age will lead to a lot of disappointed 40 yr olds.

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Even though I'm about 90% sure this is a very poor attempt at trolling, I'll go ahead and say that if you do ever get interviews (based off your immaculate GPA and flawless healthcare experience you may get one or two) be sure to give them this reasoning for choosing PA school over Med school. 

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@emedpa I guess it's nice to have moderators like you who provide a cautious perspective and reality check to some pre pas that have a more superficial idea of what a pa does, but I wish there were more older pas on this forum that actually have good things to say about this profession... Most of the pas that I work with now are really satisfied with their jobs and its a shame that this optimistic outlook isn't projected in this forum

 

As in lateral mobility, I meant that it is a lot easier for pas to go from one specialty to the next without going to school for an extended time like a md.

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see the future of the pa profession thread started today.

AndersenPA, the other senior mod here is very happy as a pa. I think the fact that he did a surgical residency right out of school and landed his dream job right after that has a lot to do with it. if I had my current job 20 years ago I would have nothing but good to say about the profession , but there has been a lot of blood, sweat and tears between then and now and the road has been much longer and harder than it reasonably needed to be with people throwing up arbitrary barriers every step of the way.

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In regard to didymus's quote "some people take issue with not being the expert, not having the final say."

 

The problem arises when you DO become the "expert" on various topics, you read all that has been published, you can quote literature better than the docs on various topics, but you are still treated by administration, staff, and patients as if you are inferior and that there is no way that you could possibly know as much or more because you are ONLY a PA.

 

If you are a motivated/ambitious person who takes a proactive approach in terms of your education following graduation, you will inevitably reach this point during your career. How you react when you get to this point is the true test. It's easy to say that you wont become frustrated as hell by it, but until you are in that position, it is tough to know.

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well said acozadd. I was frustrated as hell(bet you didn't notice...)

I'm developing a little niche of expertise in global health and tropical medicine. had a pt recently ask about malaria prophylaxis for travel and a doc thought he knew what he was talking about. he didn't . I did. I proved it right in front of him and the pt with a literature search to back my point. that doc is not likely to question me again about stuff like this....the results of my doctoral project are going to be used to change several health care protocols in Haiti, which have the potential to save thousands of lives over the next decade. that is very gratifying.

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In regard to didymus's quote "some people take issue with not being the expert, not having the final say."

 

The problem arises when you DO become the "expert" on various topics, you read all that has been published, you can quote literature better than the docs on various topics, but you are still treated by administration, staff, and patients as if you are inferior and that there is no way that you could possibly know as much or more because you are ONLY a PA.

 

If you are a motivated/ambitious person who takes a proactive approach in terms of your education following graduation, you will inevitably reach this point during your career. How you react when you get to this point is the true test. It's easy to say that you wont become frustrated as hell by it, but until you are in that position, it is tough to know.

 

This is well-said and I totally agree.

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Didymus: I'm thinking that if you do get accepted into PA school and if your wife is imbedded in her current position, you might have the opportunity to become her PA.  That would be a sweet deal.   IF she is in hospital medicine you would have a better chance of being hired on her service if you enter into a residency after PA school.

 

It means she would be your boss at work and maybe you will be the boss at home.  I dunno.  It works out that way sometimes.

 

In my neck of the woods when there is a MD/MD couple both get hired, and the MD/NP couple get hired as well as it is a deal the MD (or DO) explicitly requests in their negotiations that the spouse be considered for a job, otherwise, no deal.  

 

I live rural and have seen this scenario many times.  As they say...Equal Opportunity Employer rules go to the wayside, but it is what it is. You have strings. I don't mean violins. 

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HAHAHAHAHAHAHA

 

Ha ha haha haha ha

 

Ha

 

Ohhh, man. If you only knew how many times I looked at the MD students at my school, and wished I could trade places with them.

 

As others have said, PA school is more intense, day by day and week by week, than 4-year med school. Maybe that's not universally true, and you're somehow comparing a really tough MD program with a really easy PA school, but these things tend to be pretty well standardized, so I doubt it.

 

MD school: probably more embryology, more cell biology, more organic chemistry actually getting used for something.

 

PA school: similar curriculum design, really, just less drill-down depth in a few areas, and a lot more focus on clinical application. And everything is crammed into a shorter period of time, thus becoming more intense.

 

MD school gross anatomy at my school: First (Fall) semester, about 12 weeks.

 

PA school gross anatomy at my school: First (Summer) semester, about 9 weeks. Exact same instructors, exact same material, exact same tests. MS-1s from the previous year who had been unable to complete their course for whatever reason showed up to our test days so they could re-take them.

 

MD school typical class day: lecture, lecture,  study time, lunch, lecture or maybe just stay in the library because the test isn't for a week and the instructor doesn't grade on attendance, leave at 4

 

PA school typical class day: lecture, lecture, lecture, lunch, lab, lecture, lecture, at least one test every Friday, instructors call your house if you aren't there in the morning to make sure you're not going to miss too much.

 

And then there's the remediation stuff. I don't know about MD school (and I heard about a fair number of courses re-taken for a lot of people) but in our PA program, you fail one test, you're doing make-up work and new tests, and you're in danger of failing the class. You fail one class, you're on probation and you have meetings and make-up work and you're at risk of not advancing to the clinical phase. Good luck with that.

 

So, in short: MD school can (and seems to often be) more self-directed, more flexible. If your best way to study and learn isn't lectures and reading by yourself late into the night, MD school might be a whole lot better. MD school seems to be very much about giving people what they need to do well. PA school is too, but the spectre of remediation is always hanging over you, and there's so little time for the didactic phase, you can easily find yourself decelerated by a whole year, or starting clinicals months after your classmates, not graduating with them, if you're allowed to stay in the program in the first place.

 

MD school is difficult, and lengthy. PA school is intense, and a little shorter.

Wow, thank you for this info! Very interesting

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So if PA school is more intense and not that much shorter than med school then why did you guys choose to become PAs over MD/DOs? The PAs that I have shadowed, particularly in primary care, seem to do the exact same job as the MDs but get paid half the ammount. Why didn't any of you just go to med school, enjoy a less intense curriculum, and end up with a similar job but with more autonomy&money?

 

EMEDPA has said its cuz he wanted to avoid orgo. What about the rest of yall?

 

For me, it was a few things:

 

- I was about 30 when I finally got serious about a medical career

- I wanted to start a family sometime in the next 5-10 years

- I really have an attitude problem with certain types of authority, and institutions that perpetuate it

- I feel that the modern American system of MD education has some serious flaws

- I didn't want to get locked down to one specialty for the rest of my life

- As I worked with and got to know various people at various levels in the medical sphere, I came to understand that I had zero interest in being a department head/ practice owner/ boss/ major stakeholder. I just wanted to see patients, practice medicine, and go home more or less on time.

 

For me, PA was the better choice by far, and 6 years later I still feel that way. Maybe after 12 or 18 years I'll feel more like EMED does, but for now I feel like switching my pre-Med to a pre-PA course of study was the smartest thing I ever did. And I do practice more or less in the settings I want, the way I want.

 

Do I wish I made more money? Totally. Would it be cool for everybody to call me 'Doctor' and give me a pile of un-earned respect? Yes (and sometimes people do this anyway, no matter what I try to explain to them). Would I go back and change things? Nope.

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Time, and DEBT. And I don't really care about being a doc. My ego doesn't need it either. I've never regretted not going to med school, and I had 5 interviews lined up before I even applied to PA school.

 

I think some people should be docs because they just cant hang with the dependent provider role. That's fine. Personally I have enough autonomy in my job. I see my own pts and call my own shots UNLESS I don't know what to do...and then I relish having an SP on site to go to for advice. 

This is my reasoning as well.

 

I do not regret going to PA school.

 

Have I experienced a lack of respect? Sure. Very occasionally (once that I can think of), a patient specifically requested the doctor instead of me. I didn't care though because I have plenty of my own patients to worry about (these patients tends to be pains in the asses anyway).

 

Also, I have had other docs want to specifically talk to my SP. Again, it didn't really bother me. I just gave the phone to her and documented the encounter. I ended up accomplishing what I wanted anyway (getting a patient that I felt would bottom out admitted to the hospital). It took more time, but it was worth it....because it felt good to stick it to that guy.

 

From what I've seen, to be honest, the lack of respect is negligible. But, then, this is purely subjective and anecdotal. My idea of an unimportant event may be catastrophic to someone else. It really depends on the unique perspective of the person experiencing it (so take what any of us say with a grain of salt).

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I enjoy being a PA and don't regret it at all. For a lot of reasons I have spelled out before it was a natural career path for me and, overall, has been very good to me.

Life and family have forced me to make a job choice I might not otherwise have made. I like my work for the most part. I really like the people I work with. However I work for a large corporate organization and I am daily frustrated with nonsensical and ill informed policies made by bean counters and graph readers who don't understand the actual delivery of care...just what is in reports. The physicians, who are all now employees, suffer the same angst. It seems to be axiomatic of corporation medicine.

It is what it is. Learning to let go of all the worry about things I can't control is what will help me maintain my sanity.

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On 3/30/2015 at 9:26 PM, didymus said:

 

Not sure where you work, but this is not how it is in any setting I've ever seen or heard about from people working directly in healthcare. The vast majority of the docs I know of work insane hours, while many of the PA's are capping out at 40. NO docs are working 2 days per week and making 6-8x what PA's are making. This is simply untrue, and just a massive exaggeration in every way. The only physicians I know who are banking big money are working like 80-hour weeks and have been in practice 20+ years (meaning they haven't ever slowed down from residency, and some are working even more hours).

 

Often the caution to students on the fence about medical school is that they need to be prepared to be working crazy hours for the rest of their careers--especially surgeons--and to be prepared not to see their families very much. Of all the docs I know (and I know a lot of doctors) none of them fit your description of hours worked and pay earned. I'm not saying you don't work with some rich physicians, but the statistics show that it is highly uncommon for doctors to make more than $400,000 (and that most are making less than $250,000) and the number that do is shrinking all the time. The docs I know are pulling between $80-$100 per hour (and $100 per hour is near the top). The PA's I know are making between $40-$60 per hour (with $60 being at the very top). That means the physicians, with a minimum of 5 years more training are making around 25% more than PA's.

 

You must work in a niche specialty, but I can't imagine what specialty it is for the docs to only be working 2 days a week and making that kind of money. The only doctors I know working that little are those who are mothers and want more time with their children. And they sure as hell aren't making big bucks working 0.4-0.5FTE. I know of one physician who works 0.5FTE and she makes $100,000 with no benefits. On those two days she works, she sees 30-35 patients probably, and does a lot of procedures. Those are two very long, very busy days for her. To think that if she worked the other 2 days of the week to be at 1.0FTE, and make around $200K with benefits isn't all that crazy. The 1.0FTE PA's at the practice are making $95,000-100,000+. So the physician makes, maybe, double what the PA's make. Sounds fair to me.

 

Just to make it clear, your perspective is the exception rather than the rule. The suicide rate among physicians isn't so astronomically high that studies are done over it because doctors are overstressed from 2 days a week of work and $800,000 in income, managing their overworked PA's from a tropical vacation somewhere. The suicide rate is so high because most of them are working like dogs (30+ patients per day in outpatient settings), 5 days a week, going home to chart until 10pm, not seeing their families, taking regular call, huge responsibility and liability since theirs is often the final decision re: patient care, and, thus, the backlash is theirs when things go wrong, constantly facing reimbursement decreases (while PA's and NP's are seeing steady increases in pay), increasingly negative public perception, and so on.

 

I am married to an attending physician who works on faculty with a residency program. I know much about the stresses of physicians, residents, and medical students. I have also spent a lot of time working with PA's. The reality is, the two jobs just aren't the same, and they really aren't even close. Maybe out in the sticks the level of responsibility mirrors that of physicians, but even there it just isn't the same--and only on forums like this have I ever seen PA's complain so much about physicians, while simultaneously pleading with others to go to med school because you regret not going. It's madness.

 

I've been hopeful about the PA profession because my experience has been that PA's and physicians have, by and large, excellent working relationships and rapport. MD's and PA's are those guarding the gates of the medical profession against the invading NP's, who are threatening the very fabric of healthcare education and delivery. Man, some of the bitter PA's on this thread really throw a wrench into that perception.

 

There is a huge amount of bitterness with some here, and it has definitely skewed their perception of reality.

 

Just reading this now

 

Not sure where you are hearing doc's only makeing $100/hour and your salary estimates are way off for my area

 

10 years ago IM doc's started at 180k in the hospital 

PA's start at about 100k

 

$60/hour is nor "only 25%" less then $100 - per your math - - 

 

 

I would be very cautious of taking on the role of expert "because my wife is an attending"   People tend to misrepresent salary, and it is similar to anecdotal evidence versus EBM....  they only real way to look at this is with specific numbers from each profession that are not bias

 

PA's pretty much have this in the AAPA salary report and doc's have a few different reports on their income.  You look at these and realize that Docs FAR out earn PA's - and in the non specialty worlds we are going pretty much the same jobs.... in my world I do the EXACT same job as the doc I replaced clinically.  

 

 

Not attacking anyone, but makes me think of going to work in a small clinic where the husband wife team is the doc and the practice manager......

https://www.thestreet.com/personal-finance/physician-assistant-salary-14666367

 

How-Much-Do-Physicians-Earn-Overall.-696x583.png

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On 3/30/2015 at 9:51 PM, didymus said:

 

They don't. Possibly in BFE they will, but generally, physician extenders (PA/NP) are seeing bread and butter cases to take the load off of the physicians who are better trained to see more complex medical conditions. With more groups and health systems dropping the hammer on providers to see more and more patients, doctors can't really afford to see the standard cough/cold/runny nose stuff. My experience as one who ran a primary care clinic for a few years before deciding to quit and become a clinician (PA or MD, still deciding), this is how things worked. As someone who is married to a physician, I'm aware that this is how things work at a large academic hospital as well.

 

you are 100% wrong on this point

 

I owned my own house call practice and was the ONLY provider doing house calls - I did everything a doc would do

In my current position I replaced a doc and clinically I do EXACTLY the same job - they did have some admin responsibility that I help with but more formally responsible for

 

in the first part of my career I did see some of the simple cases - now I function as a doc. Period 

 

I wold caution you in a few realms

1) PA's are happy to be PA's - a lot of us are not bitter or doc wanna be

2) if you have not worked as  a PA or Doc, you really are not a first hand expert - yes you can know a lot, and have many excellent thoughts and opinions, but it is not the same - on this note even us crusty old PA's understand that everyone has different experiences and issues with our profession so basing everything off my own experiences is wrong - instead we come together to talk about shared experiences and try to advance out profession

 

Please name even one other profession where another separate profession has end all, be all, final say over a different profession..... yep there is none. on this we stand alone, and this I believe is not good for the PA profession.  

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  • 5 months later...

I am a PA and my husband is an MD. We met in school. We had the same classes. 

 

Med students do not have a regular schedule in the summer- just easy stuff. So PA students have 7 semesters and MD students have 8.... the extra semester (in our case, anyway) was mostly going into greater detail about genetics and microbiology (so the med students get more of the “building blocks” of medicine, if you will).

 

PA school was hands down the hardest thing I’ve ever done. *Much* harder than getting in.  And I was a Division I distance swimmer in college, and double majored in Chemistry and Biology. I was also valedictorian of my high school, if that means anything at all. 

 

I almost went to med school, took the MCAT and everything. Then a very close family friend who was an MD told me to go to Pa school, not med school. I’m SO GLAD HE DID.

Now I actually make more annually than my husband, believe it or not (I have 2 jobs- a full-time job where I am paid to sleep, and a part-time job in Urgent Care). He is a primary care MD. I work only 2 days a week, and I’m paid to sleep 2 nights/week.  BE A PA. You always walk into a good thing as a PA, whereas as an MD you have to build it yourself. Hope this helps and good luck!!! 

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