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How strict is Stanford's 3,000-hour direct patient contact requirement?


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Hi all,

 

Although Stanford mentions on their website that applications that don't meet this 3,000-hour requirement are considered "incomplete," does anyone know about or have experience with their flexibility? I'm a graduating senior in college and have worked part-time as an EMT, clinical research assistant, and have done several volunteering gigs involving hands-on care. Estimating what I think makes sense gives me ~1,500 hours.

 

I've accepted a two-year teaching position with Teach For America after graduation and, during this time of working a full-part time job, will have to complete some extra course requirements by taking night classes. So, I won't have much time to work as an EMT and volunteering will likely be difficult to fit in. How do I "keep my feet wet" or will it not look weird that my last real hands-on patient care experience was two-years ago (from the time of application)?

 

Thanks for any information in advance!

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Instead of teaching, why not just get health care experience. Do not get me wrong, I am a teacher myself, and I love it, however your first year is going to be difficult. It is for every teacher. You are going to have understand the culture of the community you are working in (if you are not from there already), the culture of your school, the dynamics of your school system, and most importantly you have to be there for your students. The most important thing is that relationship building with them. You will not be able to teach unless you have built those relationships. Lesson planning is not a piece of cake either. I have failed a thousands times in my lessons until I got one that worked well. I truly believe that teaching is one of those jobs that will prepare you for anything, but you have to give it sometime before you get the hang of things. Since you will only be giving it two years, I think it would be better worth your time to get the 3,000 hours you need in that two years, than to pursue the teaching. In all honesty, if you are serious about teaching, give it 5 at least because that is what the kids will need. 

 

Congrats on getting into Teach for America, they are a highly competitive program. Get to know you school system really well, and learn from all of the teachers who work in it, especially the ones who have been in it for 30+ years. They are great resources and can help you out when you do not know what to do. Good luck with what you decide!  

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