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How common/possible is 1-year deferral of matriculation?


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I'm curious to know, once accepted to PA school, how possible (or common) is it for a program to accept a request (by accepted applicant) for a 1-year deferral?  Among many (non-medical) graduate programs, deferral is extremely common.  As I understand, among medical schools, it is extremely uncommon (although possible, in certain situations--usually health-related).  If an accepted PA applicant wants to defer a year, is this typically possible?  Are there certain conditions that are considered more favorably than others?  Or is such a request considered to be flat-out ridiculous?  Any insight from those who have successfully deferred, those who's requests have been denied, or others with some knowledge of the process would be greatly appreciated.  Thanks!

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We had a couple students leave early during the first semester for non-academic reasons (family and medical). Both were offered the ability to return and start again the following year, if their situations resolved.

 

If they accepted you already, I see no reason why they would not let you defer. Giving the program ample notice also allows them to fill your seat for the current class. Medical, family, and financial considerations that arise after applying should all be valid reasons for a school to defer your enrollment.

 

IMO, It's not really a risk to save a spot for a qualified applicant for another year. The school has long lists to pull from if you don't come back.

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Zoo- I was thinking the same thing. I have a couple acceptances, but we would have to move out of state. It would be nice to prepare ourselves another year.

 

I was thinking of writing notes to program director stating this. I guess if I have to apply again , I will.

 

 

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I have a feeling that some programs are very open to deferrals, especially if done shortly after an offer and the offer is early in their cycle of offers, while other programs next to never grant it.

 

I agree. But I would also think some would just say thanks but no thanks we'll take the next student in line. 

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I would think if a program wants you, they want you. It is not in anyone's interest to have a student start the program if they are going to hamper their chance of success by having outside stressors - finances, health, family problems - affect their performance.

 

If a student had a decent reason I would have no problem with them deferring. I would be steamed if they deferred to stall a year to apply to other programs, however.

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My program allowed me a 1 year deferral when I (SURPRISE!) became pregnant with my son. I was set to deliver two weeks before the semester began. Without a deferral, I would have delivered, relocated 8 hours away, found housing and child care for an infant, hoped my husband could find a job quickly, and began the fulltime program in the span of 12 days. I work hard, but that seemed to be just too much to try and do, especially as a new parent. What would have suffered most (aside from sanity) would have been my school: the whole reason I was there in the first place. So I crossed my fingers and made some phone calls.

The school is not one that easily grants deferments, but I fought hard for mine, and I made sure to stress the point that if they wouldn't allow me a deferral this time, they'd just see my application again once the next cycle began. It worked. So if you have legitimate circumstances, I'd say you've got a shot, and it never hurts to ask.

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  • 3 months later...
  • 1 month later...

I was able to successfully defer my admission from last year to this year for financial reasons. My school was really good about it; they just required that I write a letter of explanation at least one month before the start of classes.

 

Sent from my Nexus 4 using Tapatalk

 

 

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  • 3 years later...
On 2/4/2015 at 3:55 PM, lgomez said:

My program allowed me a 1 year deferral when I (SURPRISE!) became pregnant with my son. I was set to deliver two weeks before the semester began. Without a deferral, I would have delivered, relocated 8 hours away, found housing and child care for an infant, hoped my husband could find a job quickly, and began the fulltime program in the span of 12 days. I work hard, but that seemed to be just too much to try and do, especially as a new parent. What would have suffered most (aside from sanity) would have been my school: the whole reason I was there in the first place. So I crossed my fingers and made some phone calls.

The school is not one that easily grants deferments, but I fought hard for mine, and I made sure to stress the point that if they wouldn't allow me a deferral this time, they'd just see my application again once the next cycle began. It worked. So if you have legitimate circumstances, I'd say you've got a shot, and it never hurts to ask.

I just found out that I am pregnant with my first child and I am due my second week of my didactic year. If I call and ask for deferment and they do not allow it, will they immediately withdraw my acceptance? Or can I still attend and make it work? My situation is tough because my husband is in the military and will not be able to relocate with me for school so I will have to raise the baby by myself and with family. I guess my worry is if I tell them I am pregnant I don’t want to lose my acceptance immediately. If I have to make it work I will. 

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I think that some of the programs decision regarding deferment is financially driven by the institution.  Accreditation standards only allow a certain number of students per cohort.  If there are 50 seats in the program and your deferment brings them to 49 will they want to go to 51 the following year.  They can't unless you first matriculate (at what point are you considered matriculated) and then decelerate (for medical reasons).  It would be less of an issue if they budget for some attrition and include you in the next cohort numbers.  You may need to show up to class on the first day and then take a medical leave.

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I am also curious to this topic. I know two people who have been granted a 1 and 2 year deferral for medical school- apparently those are quite common. They were both offered to be a full-time missionaries during that time. I too have recently been offered a leadership position with a Christian organization, and this is the only time in my life I would be able to take it. I was recently accepted to a program that matriculates 2 weeks after I graduate college, and I just feel like taking a year off would benefit me so much as a PA student. I would not be as rushed entering into the program, could grow in my leadership and character, in addition I would be working as an MA full-time, gaining more healthcare experience. Since I applied with only 650 PCE hours, I really do believe that more healthcare experience and life experience would benefit me as a PA student and as a future provider. The program I've been accepted to only does deferrals for active military members, so I have heard. I'm wondering if I should plea my case.

 

Let me know if anyone has any thoughts!

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I don’t have kids and you already got some great advice, so I’ll just give a slightly different perspective.

The faster you graduate PA school, the better. Our graduating class from last year had just about a 100% emoloyment rate before graduating. This year with my class, we have been out of school for a couple months now and only 40% of people have jobs period, with the majority being PRN/no benefits. The market is tightening quickly unfortunately.

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