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I have just been accepted to a very reputable school. However, it is one of the most expensive schools in one of the most expensive places to live. It is also a three year program. 

 

I want to know if it's worth it to attend a really expensive school now, OR if it's more advisable to wait a year to attend a cheaper two-year program. Waiting a year to attend a cheaper two-year program would mean that I would be graduating roughly the same time as I would if I attend the school that I was just accepted to. 

 

Also, does the reputation of the school have any impact on the future salary? 

 

Please comment and offer your words of wisdom!

 

 

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Also, does the reputation of the school have any impact on the future salary?

No, school reputation really does not.

 

Congratulations on gaining acceptance to a program, but you appear to have violated one of the fundamental rules of school applications: Only apply to places that you are sure you would go if they offered you a seat.

 

Having said that, there's definitely something to be said for three year programs: more time to master the material.  Plus, you're going to be losing a year of income on the LOW end side of things--assuming you don't already make more now than you will as a PA.

 

Consider also that there's no guarantee you'll get a seat in another program next year.  Many things can happen between now and then.

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No, school reputation really does not.

 

Congratulations on gaining acceptance to a program, but you appear to have violated one of the fundamental rules of school applications: Only apply to places that you are sure you would go if they offered you a seat.

 

Having said that, there's definitely something to be said for three year programs: more time to master the material.  Plus, you're going to be losing a year of income on the LOW end side of things--assuming you don't already make more now than you will as a PA.

 

Consider also that there's no guarantee you'll get a seat in another program next year.  Many things can happen between now and then.

 

With all due respect, and I think I get what you are meaning, but it's only after the interview that a potential student can possibly be certain of this. And in many unfortunate cases, it's only after a student is well-immersed into a program do they realize a program is a poor choice, for myriad of reasons.

 

That being said, I agree with all of your other points. :-)

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but you appear to have violated one of the fundamental rules of school applications: Only apply to places that you are sure you would go if they offered you a seat.

 

Not everyone has that luxury - many of us apply to as many schools as possible and take the one acceptance out of x number of applications.

 

OP - if this is you, then just take the opportunity.  You are going to be in a lot of debt, no doubt about it, but the key to paying off that debt is to live well below your means and pay it off as early as possible.  For your federal loans there exists a public service loan forgiveness program, google that one.  You'll be making enough as a working PA to pay off a large amount of debt, it just requires financial discipline.  Don't buy that Porsche Cayman S or mortgage that $400,000 home until your debts are paid down.

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