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Hey everyone,

 

I have a question about transferring credits from two different schools.

 

I'm applying for PA School at the moment and when I first went to school I didn't do so hot. My GPA was a 3.0 but I have like 6 withdrawals and 4 C's. I stopped going to school, worked for two years aka got my life together and then went back to school. Now I'm graduating with a 3.8. Would it be considered academic dishonesty if I didn't submit the first school's transcripts? I don't need any of those credits, do I have to submit the credits?

 

All types of feed back would be helpful, thank you!

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Guest MedLib42

Hey everyone,

 

I have a question about transferring credits from two different schools.

 

I'm applying for PA School at the moment and when I first went to school I didn't do so hot. My GPA was a 3.0 but I have like 6 withdrawals and 4 C's. I stopped going to school, worked for two years aka got my life together and then went back to school. Now I'm graduating with a 3.8. Would it be considered academic dishonesty if I didn't submit the first school's transcripts? I don't need any of those credits, do I have to submit the credits?

 

All types of feed back would be helpful, thank you!

 

Yes, absolutely. It actually states on the CASPA website that failure to disclose all schools previously attended is considered a fraudulent application, and they usually find out (and as a result, won't process your app). I actually forgot about one school when I was applying - it was a CC from many, many years ago - and they found out and contacted me with a "fraudulent app" warning, although they did allow me to correct the issue. If for some reason they don't find out right away, and the schools find out later, you won't be admitted. So I certainly would not take that risk!

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Hey everyone,

 

I have a question about transferring credits from two different schools.

 

I'm applying for PA School at the moment and when I first went to school I didn't do so hot. My GPA was a 3.0 but I have like 6 withdrawals and 4 C's. I stopped going to school, worked for two years aka got my life together and then went back to school. Now I'm graduating with a 3.8. Would it be considered academic dishonesty if I didn't submit the first school's transcripts? I don't need any of those credits, do I have to submit the credits?

 

All types of feed back would be helpful, thank you!

 

What do you think? How is this even a question? 

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I got a bachelor degree in the late 80s, final gpa 2.7.

I repeated much of what I did poorly in and then added all the science prereqs with much better grades.

Quite a few interview committees are not fixated on finding the perfect candidate. There usually isnt one.

Your little life experience is just that. Sounds like you have a whole story to tell, dont be afraid to tell it, warts and all.

It will give you something to base your essay on when you apply or discuss during an interview.

Good luck.

G Brothers PA-C

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My situation is VERY similar to gbrothers98, although I didn't repeat much from my initial undergrad (because it was in Business and not applicable for applying to PA school), and I do have a subsequent MS with a 3.65 GPA.  However, I had to take many prereqs as I had very few science classes previously so I took a solid load of post bacc pre-requisites (and additional course work like Medical Law & Ethics, Pharmacology, Pathophysiology) to demonstrate that I could do MUCH better than my early academic record showed, but also because those early grades DO factor in to your overall GPA, and regardless of how well you did later, MANY schools won't look at anyone with an undergrad GPA < 3.0.  Once I got my overall undergrad GPA over 3.0, I received quite a number of interviews and I've been offered slots at two schools.  Recognizing and learning from your failures (and almost failures) is an important attribute.  

 

FYI, CASPA FAQ includes pretty decent information on how they calculate your GPA.  Make sure you take a look at that when you are preparing yourself for the process!  Best of luck.  

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Definitely disclose all transcripts. There is a website schools and other institutions are able to use to find out all schools you were ever registered. Don't start off the application process on the wrong foot. Also,dishonesty is not a quality PA schools look for in their applicants.

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There are some schools that will replace grades and recalculate your GPA.  You have to find those gems. They are out there. 

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First off, don't do it. It may come back to bite you. CASPA is very clear about submission of all transcripts. I wasn't clear about the number of schools attended so forgive me if this doesn't make sense.  If any of those undesired credits ended up on the transcript submitted to a program you have a lot of explaining to do. As mentioned by someone previously there are ways to identify all schools attended if need be. The people in financial aid have to do it all the time. I agree with G. Brothers and think you should use it to demonstrate your improvement in academic endeavors as well as personal growth.

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