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How much did you know your anatomy and physiology?

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I have a question about how much did you remember your anatomy and physiology going into PA school? I have a huge fear of not remembering a lot when going into PA school. Does it even matter? I say this because you will get drilled either way in the PA school anatomy and phys class.

 

I would love to hear your feedback! Thanks.

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I was fortunate to have both a great dissection A+P course as an undergrad and a great didactic A+P course in PA school so remember quite a bit of the relevant stuff. much of the microscopic level stuff and chemical pathways stuff though is long gone because it is not relevant to the day to day practice of medicine and soon forgotten. stuff like innervations and vascular supply, names of muscles/tendons, etc is still there...

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thanks for the reply! I'm just curious and worried, but i know PA school A & P is hard regardless and i won't remember everything anyway. As long as you put in the work you will do just fine in PA school whether you remember everything or nothing at all from undergraduate A & P.

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So I'm a new grad and my anatomy and phys class in PA school was AMAZING. We dissected our own cadavers from head to toe, which was a huge plus, compared to the virtual dissections or pre-dissected cadavers offered at other schools.

 

I learned so much in that one semester than I did for a year of undergrad anatomy and phys. I agree with what was said above I remember most of the important muscles, innervations and blood supply. If you reread and look at them enough they will stick in your mind. Do I remember the kreb cycle? Not really.

 

I did not have a good A&P class when I was in undergrad. I came into PA school knowing nothing, which is sad...I know. But I worked very hard in my anatomy and phys class and would stay after hours learning the cadavers inside and out. I also studied with two other people so that was also a plus. You will not remember a lot of the stuff because it is def A LOT to take in. But if you put in hard work and reread the lecture and stay back and look at the cadavers by yourself, you should be fine. Best of luck to you.  

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RMathews619 thanks for the reply! great to hear you learn a lot and are doing well. How long did it take you to find a job after graduation? and what did you specialize in if you don't mind me asking?

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Well I graduated in May and took my boards mid June and found out I passed in July. I haven't started my job yet as I am in the credentialing process which takes 2-3 months. I am hoping to start my orientation this week. My speciality will be in Internal medicine/cardiology at a well known hospital in NY. 

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^^^I challenge any practicing MD or PA a couple years out of school to come take the lab exam. 100 blank lines on a sheet of paper, write-in answers with no word bank, SPELLING COUNTS, corresponding to 100 pins placed anywhere on a fully dissected cadaver and a skeleton.

 

I'd love to see the average score. :)

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I recommend getting a strong foundation in Physiology going into school. Take a couple upper level classes if you can. You will forget a lot of it, but it will be easier to re-learn it the second time around when you are exposed to it in school. Also will make it a lot easier to understand the diseases and drugs you are studying. 

 

I wish I took an immunology class. It's hard to understand autoimmune diseases if you don't have a solid background in immunology. I'm currently trying to make up for this by reading some immunology books.

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PA school A&P needs to teach to the lowest common denominator. Anything you retain will be bonus but you won't be expected to know anything cold.

Programs vary in A&P quality. YMMV as they say.

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I remember the leg bone connects to the hip bone (I think).  I'm pretty sure there are some arteries and veins down there, too.

 

 

I work in ENT

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