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JoeBallent

Types of HCE and their weight in admissions

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Hello all,

 

Pre-PA student currently knocking out pre-reqs and looking forward to applying this coming spring (2015).  I do part-time EMT work, but the bulk of my HCE hours will come from my full-time job at a treatment center dealing in addiction recovery and trauma.  This is more of a mental health focus.  

 

I'd welcome thoughts and feedback on what weight different types of experience carry (emergency medicine versus mental health, etc.) as well as stories of success (or failure) in how you used your hours to best and most accurately present yourself to the interviewers and admissions folks.

 

Thanks, and best of luck!

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My two cents is that I've gotten 7 interviews for this cycle with a past history of being a scribe for 11 months, then an EMT for 7 months followed by scribing for going on three months now and currently... 

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really varies from program to program. some programs want specific high level experience like paramedic, rn, resp. therapist. etc while others basically have a check box that says "worked in health care for 500 hrs" and allow anything. research individual programs and see what their grads are doing.

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I'd imagine that the combination of being an EMT and a mental health worker makes you a competitive candidate.  You've got the people skills and the tech skills.  If you can tie them into your vision of how you see yourself working as a future PA, I think you'll do fine.

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Cool, thanks to both of your for your responses.  EMEDPA, do you see a strong correlation between quality of program and specificity of required HCE?

yes. In my experience the folks who become the best PAs have a combination of significant high level experience measured not in months, but in years, and great grades.

Career paramedics, nurses, medical assistants, resp. therapists, military medics, etc are the rock stars in most programs. Those with extensive life experience do very well.

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My two cents is that I've gotten 7 interviews for this cycle with a past history of being a scribe for 11 months, then an EMT for 7 months followed by scribing for going on three months now and currently... 

 

Was this work paid or volunteer? I am doing something similar, but it is all volunteer. 

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