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Dear all, 


 


I'm a new mom and will start PA program next June. Since I'm taking care of the baby at home now and have my parents' help till Dec, I have a little extra time. If I want to study some PA courses in advance (in case I don't have a lot of time to study with a 9 months old crawling everywhere next year), where should I start? Should I review some pre PA courses like biochem, anatomy, or should I find some PA textbooks to read, or even PANCE guidelines, maybe?


 


Any suggestions will be appreciated! Wish all have a good day!


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Anatomy and pathophysiology would be my recommendations. No matter what, you will have a lot of studying to do when you get into school and are likely going to need to have someone around who can help you care for your baby.

 

Good luck!

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Thanks! Are these flash cards the PA student must have?

 

Also just curious, what are the differences between pre PA anatomy and PA school anatomy classes? Is it more detailed in PA school?

 

Thanks again!

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Thanks! Are these flash cards the PA student must have?

 

Also just curious, what are the differences between pre PA anatomy and PA school anatomy classes? Is it more detailed in PA school?

 

Thanks again!

I doubt you must have these flashcards to succeed. What you need is good memory and lots of studying.

Regardless, you will need help caring for the baby. I think you underestimate How Much you will need to study during your first year. It will not be easy! I wish you luck.

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Guest MedLib42

Thanks! Are these flash cards the PA student must have?

 

Also just curious, what are the differences between pre PA anatomy and PA school anatomy classes? Is it more detailed in PA school?

 

Thanks again!

 

I don't think any PA school requires Netter's, but I will say they are one of the most helpful, if not THE most helpful, things I (and most of my classmates) used to help pass anatomy. I was just barely passing using the atlas, text, and studying my butt off in the cadaver lab, and once I started using the cards I went from just scraping by to actually getting A's on lab exams. I should mention, though, we didn't go through all the structures on the Netter's cards (probably 50-75% of them) and they weren't quite as helpful for lecture exams. For lectures I had the best luck just using lecture notes.

 

More detailed? YES. PA school anatomy is MUCH, much, much more detailed. For me, it felt almost completely unrelated to undergrad anatomy (which I had aced). The amount of neuroanatomy and vasculature we had to know in my program was staggering (although obviously still doable!) and much more detailed than undergrad.

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So, essentially having these note cards is a necessity, and having them before even entering into the PA programs would tremendously behoove a prospective student.? Along with this, I would imagine getting a hold of a PA textbook (specific to A&P) would further ones understanding of what to expect and better prepare you, especially if given a year or so to go through difficult sections, repetition is paramount.

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So, essentially having these note cards is a necessity, and having them before even entering into the PA programs would tremendously behoove a prospective student.? Along with this, I would imagine getting a hold of a PA textbook (specific to A&P) would further ones understanding of what to expect and better prepare you, especially if given a year or so to go through difficult sections, repetition is paramount.

Nothing can prepare you. Enjoy your time now because you won't have it in the future!!

Spend your money on vacation, date night, some running shoes, etc rather than books/note cards at this point.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

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I agree that you should just enjoy your time now. I went on a trip overseas before starting the program. I was planning on reviewing anatomy since I last took it 6 years ago in undergrad but that didn't happen and I still Aced anatomy in PA school. I don't think you can ever be prepared for any class in PA school, so don't feel guilty. If you really want to start now you may review some anatomy and pathophys. There's a great book called clinical pathophysiology made ridiculously simple that I believe can be a good start to prepare for pathophys.

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I'd recommend a PANCE book or the USMLE Step 1 First Aid. Also, learning how to read EKG's will save you a lot of hassle during cardio week. Good luck!

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Honestly I don't think you need to read the PANCE or the USMLE book yet as you haven't even started classes. Those books are great to supplement when you finished learning about a specific organ system and its diseases/treatment. Those books will give you mnemonics or helpful hints after you have learned the basics in class thus to further strengthen your knowledge. I would try to read an EKG book beforehand. During PA school we used Dubin's EKG book and it was fantastic. You can try to read currents, as it is used by many programs for their clinical medicine course. Remember the PANCE is 16%(majority) Cardiology so if you get a head start you wouldn't have a problem when it is taught in your school and most importantly for the PANCE. Best of luck and enjoy the baby before the workload increases.     

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Honestly, the two hardest subjects for students are: Renal physiology and infectious diseases. Understanding microorganisms and why certain abx work for each one and why they are most important. Pathophys made ridiculously simple and microbiology made ridiculously simple will give you a head start on those subjects.

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Congratulations on getting in!  It's also awesome that you want to get a jump on things.  Between being accepted and starting the PA program, I took an advanced physiology class (300 level), but on a pass/fail basis.  The professor put a lot of emphasis on nerve and cell function.  Now that I am involved in the didactic year, I am thankful I took this class.  I have an edge when it comes to tougher components like neurology, renal function and electrolyte imbalances.  

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WAY more detailed. Not just "what is this?" but "what nerve usually enervates this?"

and "what motor deficit will occur if the nerve that innervates this is transected?" and "what spinal nerve does the branch that innervates this originate from?" and "if this muscle is torn, what blood vessel could be damaged and would blood flow still be possible?" hahah i could keep going.... gotta love anatomy

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