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amyjenfour

PA Student needing to know more about psych speciality

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Hello,

I'm a PA student on clinical rotations now trying to secure a psychiatry rotation in Tallahassee, FL. The office manager I spoke to asked me many questions about what a PA practicing in Florida can do in psychiatry. I was unable to answer some of her questions about prescribing medication. I told her I thought PAs in FL could not prescribe controlled substances. She went on to say they employ NPs who had to acquire special certification in psych to write and fill certain medications, My questions are, are there options for PAs to become certified in something to give them more privileges, what exactly can PAs do in psychiatry and what resources are available for me to look this stuff up myself?

 

Thank you,

Amy

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And why do you want to within Florida again? Go north to SC or west to GA/AL and have much better practice laws.

As a side note, psych NPs have a significant advantage over PAs unless the PA has done one of the (1 or 2 nationwide??) psych PA residencies.

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And why do you want to within Florida again? Go north to SC or west to GA/AL and have much better practice laws.

As a side note, psych NPs have a significant advantage over PAs unless the PA has done one of the (1 or 2 nationwide??) psych PA residencies.

 

True. And even the residencies don't look that great... not enough coursework on theories of psychopathology/theories from the field of psychology, accurate assessment/differential dx, psychotherapy, etc. This is a large part of psych NP curriculum. It looks like the PA residencies are just focused on inpatient med management. Of course, there's only a few PA residencies for psych so there is lots of room for growth. I did see one psych residency that's for both PAs and NPs, but weirdly enough, they ask for FNPs(???)... who don't have the training to practice in psychiatry!

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True. And even the residencies don't look that great... not enough coursework on theories of psychopathology/theories from the field of psychology, accurate assessment/differential dx, psychotherapy, etc. This is a large part of psych NP curriculum. It looks like the PA residencies are just focused on inpatient med management. Of course, there's only a few PA residencies for psych so there is lots of room for growth. I did see one psych residency that's for both PAs and NPs, but weirdly enough, they ask for FNPs(???)... who don't have the training to practice in psychiatry!

 

i did one of the residencies and would say that it was fully worth while. I felt that the psychiatrists and other psychiatric providers provided us with an excellent appreciation of differentials, psychopharm, bedside psychotherapy, etc. We also got exposure well beyond psychiatry to round out our appreciation of differentials and management. My fellowship was geared more toward inpatient care, though we did some outpatient management as well. It is important to note that there are many complex issues that drive how and where PAs can practice in psychiatry, including state laws and recognition by insurance companies. Each state has its own issues and it is important to talk to a PA working in the state you work to recognize the barriers you may face. Finally, I would speak with the residency coordinator if you have concerns about FNPs. Just appreciate that as a PA we have greater flexibility.

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