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A.W.G. Dewar Tuition Insurance.. good idea?


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Hi,

 

The PA school that I will be attending this fall has a tuition refund policy, but also offers a tuition refund plan through Dewar for a little less than $300 per one year. Has anyone purchased tuition insurance through Dewar? Does anyone recommend for or against it? Any insight is great! Thanks!

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  • 3 weeks later...

What is the purpose and what are the terms. If you are concerned your health might take you out of school, it might make sense. Will it pay if you get divorced, dismissed for cheating or some other offense or circumstance that is your fault? My guess is that there are some serious limitations.

 

Let's take some possible scenarios.

1. You get really sick or have an accident, can't finish the semester, and have to start over. Do they pay? That's probably a yes.

2. You have a child and find that you can't take care of her and focus on school, so you start failing and get the boot, or a deferral. Do they reimburse for that?

3. You decide you hate your school, professors, classmates or whatever and decide to leave. Do they reimburse you?

4.How about a DUI with fatality where you are at fault?

 

Sent from my Kindle Fire HDX using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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