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MementoMori

Clinical Psychology Degree with PA License

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Well jeez, I would hope that I could at least perform in the realm of decent on the MCAT. Really, my blunder with pre-reqs for the MCAT is having to take Physics and Organic Chemistry II. Dreadfully fear Physics... I will still have to research PA outlooks in neuropsychology and behavioral health as a stand alone without the additional Psych degree. Interesting to know the realities of NP preference in Psychiatry though. 

 

 

I wasn't trying to imply you wouldn't do well on the MCAT. I was merely stating that the bar is lower for DO school.

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How do you like the dhsc process you're doing, thus far? Out of the three you mentioned, I would be trying to earn the most applicable degree. I am in an area of research now that is really neat and I am cure to delve into some others... just don't ever want a degree I don't utilize. 

see my thread on my DHSc program at the top of  the recovery room area of this forum . in short, love it. almost done.

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see my thread on my DHSc program at the top of  the recovery room area of this forum . in short, love it. almost done.

 

I will be sure to check it out. I will be able to navigate around here with no problems very soon. If I haven't worn you out with questions as is, if I were to stay in academia (research), would you recommend going through PA school first? I see the DHSc is something you did after the fact. Primarily, I am research oriented with practice taking second place. 

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then why go to PA school at all?

 

I am on my way to check out the DHSc link. And my desire to practice would not be subdued without actually practicing.

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I am a clinical psychologist and PA in private practice. I was a psychologist first, and then because I found the biopsychosocial model so compelling, wanted to be able to understand and treat the biological piece. At 35, with 2 kids, it was too much time and commitment to go the whole med school and residency route, so this has worked out well for me. I am a partner in a practice which allows me the freedom to do as much therapy and med management as I like. Unfortunately, the reimbursement for therapy is not good, and is getting worse with each passing year (the market is flooded with master's level therapists, for one). To make decent money, most of my practice is geared toward meds. This is why most psychiatrists don't do therapy...but they can do it if they choose. If I were to do it all over again, I'd do med school and psych residency. Let's face it, it's an MD world, and they will always have options and autonomy we won't.  Please understand, I love what I do, but the commitment to the PhD program--after PA school, is a minimum of 5 years in most cases, during which you'll get rusty in medicine. Four years of med school and 3-4 of residency work out to about the same amount of time training, but in the end there's much more money, independence, and broader career options with the MD. I'd be happy to answer any other questions. Best of luck.

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I see more NP propaganda up top from the resident NP...

 

Most Psych NPs that I worked/work with got their PNP from ONLINE PROGRAMS...

Yep they were instructed to read a few books on counseling theory, took a few multiple guess tests on what they read, then allowed to observe their preceptor do a little therapy.

 

PAs that want to do therapy CAN read the same books. So... the emphasis on being given a couple books to read by your online PNP program is kinda silly.

 

Yes there are billing issues for therapy by SOME Insurance companies. This is NOT really that big of a deal when one considers, like as said above...

Just about ALL Therapy is done by poorly paid/poorly reimbursed Master's Level Therapists.

 

FEW "Prescribers" (MD/DO/PA/NP) do anything more than Medication Management along with "supportive psychotherapy" and/or "Motivational Interviewing."

Why...??? Because that practice needs these HIGHLY PAID prescribers ... prescribing/managing/assessing. That's where the money is.

 

YMMV

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PAs that want to do therapy CAN read the same books.

 

The same can really be said of any facet of medical care, welcome to the information age.

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