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Want to become a PA, which method should I use?


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I am currently going into my senior year of high school and starting to think about what I want to do with my life. Which way of becoming a PA would be better, going to undergrad for 4 years to get a BS then applying to a PA school or getting into a 5 year PA program which gives you a BS and certification of being a PA? I'm in the NYC area so could go to Hunter for undergrad then transfer or go right into the CCNY PA program. Any reviews on that? Thank you!!

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I wish I had known about 5 year programs my Junior year of HS...wouldn't have been to get in since my grades were less than stellar.

If you can afford it, a 5 year BS/MS PA program should be optimal. Either way will make you a PA :D

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I am one of the biggest PA over MD advocates (for certain individuals) on the board ... even for young intelligent persons such as yourself. The direct to entry programs concern me a bit. I cannot imagine a 20 year old PA student without health care experience on the wards. I do not feel 90+% of persons in this world and in that situation have the maturity, foundation and life experience to do that job well. Im sorry I do not buy it. MAYBE someone in this program can provide a sufficient rebuttal. And then you will be 21 or 22 and full fledged PA without any prior patient care experience?  Economically it seems a home run especially with CUNY tuition. However, I worry about the new PAs ability to succeed esp long term. I would hope that if you did that program you would SERIOUSLY consider a residency program and perhaps joining a volunteer ambulance corp. I am curious what other people think. How does a 21 y/o w/o a life experience discuss depression, sexual dysfunction, alcohol abuse, or take command over a challenging trauma or resuscitation  ?

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youngest pa I have ever seen...age 19. graduated high school early with prereqs done from community college, 2 yr program (a.s.). could order morphine but not beer. lived with parents. spent most of salary on fancy sports car...seriously.

back on the subject. if you are going to do a direct entry PA program I would definitely do a residency. alternatively, do a direct entry bs/md program.

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