Jump to content
bjl12

Prerequisites Complete: What coursework to take at Community College?

Recommended Posts

I graduate with my BS in Psychology this May, but have only completed the minimum of prerequisite classes (in good - but not amazing - academic standing).  I've decided to take an extra year (Fall/Spring) to bolster my academic profile and increase HCE before applying.  I'm currently debating between Physics 1 + 2 and Genetics + unknown Spring course.  

 

Important factors to consider:

- Physics 1 + 2 would be NON-CALCULUS

- Genetics (and the other Spring course) - would be a 200-level class (since it's being taken at a CC)

 

Any suggestions on what I should do here?  I know some schools will make an issue of taking Genetics at a CC (as it is traditionally taken at a university), but I also imagine taking a non-calculus based physics would evoke similar responses (again, at a CC).

 

Thanks in advance gang

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Does the CC offer a Cellular Biology course? Anything in the realm of Pathphysiology? Have you taken any organic chemistry or biochemistry courses?

 

I've taken Bio 1 + 2 and Cellular Bio.  Sorry forgot to mention I took that at my university, but it's also listed as a 200-level class at PSU.

 

Am taking Orgo 1 + 2 at CC in Fall/Spring.  The Physics or Genetics + Unknown are designed to supplement everything else.  Pathophysiology is not offered at the CC and I do not believe Biochem is (although I can check).  I would definitely go the Genetics/Biochem route if Biochem is offered in the Spring

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The easiest and simplest thing to do is look at the schools you are interested in and see what prerequisites they require

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I took physics 1 and 2 because I was thinking pre-med but after looking at what schools require I would def go with biochem or genetics. Only 5ish schools require physics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you've finished your required prereqs and you're just trying to bolster your application, the first thing to consider is how confident you are that you can get an A in the courses you're considering. A lot of admissions is just a numbers game, and the most important number is your GPA. For your situation, I would argue that an 'A' in Film Appreciation would help your application more than a 'B' in physics.

 

If you struggled with your other prereqs then you are probably going to struggle with physics. Even if you're a natural at the subject, physics departments seem to get a disproportionate share of professors with high expectations and poor teaching methods.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the above posts. I personally really enjoyed physics 1 and 2 and could actually see how this would have more of an impact, long term, then some other required courses. I'm not sure of any schools which specifically require physics but would like to know them if someone does know. 

 

Some CC courses are just as hard as the universities. My high school AnP class was 10x harder then the one at the state school. A course is only as good as the instructor that teaches it. Sadly some PA schools do not honor CC credit, you will just have to call and find out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with the above posts. I personally really enjoyed physics 1 and 2 and could actually see how this would have more of an impact, long term, then some other required courses. I'm not sure of any schools which specifically require physics but would like to know them if someone does know. 

 

 

Riverside CC, Red Rocks CC, Grand Valley State U, Bethel U, U of Findlay, and  U of Oklahoma (both campuses) and the schools I wrote down that require physics

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed my yr of physics with lab(took in 2002 when I was really thinking hard about medschool) and found it much more interesting and applicable than chem , but as mentioned above very few pa programs require it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed my yr of physics with lab(took in 2002 when I was really thinking hard about medschool) and found it much more interesting and applicable than chem , but as mentioned above very few pa programs require it.

 

Would you take Physics over Genetics though?  That's my primary dilemma.  I imagine Physics is very useful, but Genetics just seems so much more directly applicable.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you've finished your required prereqs and you're just trying to bolster your application, the first thing to consider is how confident you are that you can get an A in the courses you're considering. A lot of admissions is just a numbers game, and the most important number is your GPA. For your situation, I would argue that an 'A' in Film Appreciation would help your application more than a 'B' in physics.

 

If you struggled with your other prereqs then you are probably going to struggle with physics. Even if you're a natural at the subject, physics departments seem to get a disproportionate share of professors with high expectations and poor teaching methods.

 

I have A's and A-'s in everything except for Chem 2 where I got a B- and I haven't take Orgo yet although I think I'll do very well (I'm just not good at log and natural log math problems - Chem 2).  Genetics seems like the better choice because it's directly applicable to medicine.  I'm not saying physics isn't, as all of it's mechanics obviously apply to everything (including medicine), but I imagine an Adcom would like to see prior success in biology/chemistry more than physics.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have A's and A-'s in everything except for Chem 2 where I got a B- and I haven't take Orgo yet although I think I'll do very well (I'm just not good at log and natural log math problems - Chem 2).  Genetics seems like the better choice because it's directly applicable to medicine.  I'm not saying physics isn't, as all of it's mechanics obviously apply to everything (including medicine), but I imagine an Adcom would like to see prior success in biology/chemistry more than physics.

I see. You could probably handle physics okay, then. However, if you're only taking one class per semester then don't think adcoms will put a whole lot of stock in your success. It will up your GPA a little bit and that will help, but adcoms want to see how you handle a full course load. Getting an A in a single solitary class doesn't prove you can handle the rigors of PA school, and I doubt the fact that you were working during this period will do much to sway that opinion. Take the class that you want to take.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Taking a full course load and course load suicide are very different things. Taking courses in a smart order, without stacking intense classes, is the way to go. Taking physics with organic is likely to spell failure of you are taking any other classes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see. You could probably handle physics okay, then. However, if you're only taking one class per semester then don't think adcoms will put a whole lot of stock in your success. It will up your GPA a little bit and that will help, but adcoms want to see how you handle a full course load. Getting an A in a single solitary class doesn't prove you can handle the rigors of PA school, and I doubt the fact that you were working during this period will do much to sway that opinion. Take the class that you want to take.

 

All of my prerequisites have been taken 1-2 at a time during 17-18 credit semesters and working ~30 hours a week.  I shouldn't have too much of an issue in the "you weren't challenged enough" field, at least I'd hope not.  Additionally, while I'll only be taking two classes in the Fall/Spring, I'll also be working at least ~50 hours.

 

And any school where an Adcom doesn't take into consideration work schedule with class schedule is not a program I want to attend.  All of my work is direct HCE, so if an Adcom were to dismiss my future semesters due to lack of credit load...I will simply consider an alternative program or career.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And any school where an Adcom doesn't take into consideration work schedule with class schedule is not a program I want to attend. All of my work is direct HCE, so if an Adcom were to dismiss my future semesters due to lack of credit load...I will simply consider an alternative program or career.

This is an excellent point! I was working full time, and studying full time, then went to a class per semester to finish my BA just because my class and work schedule did not work out together. Nobody ever asked me how come I only took one class at a time. I want to say it should not be a concern at all!

Good luck applying!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is an excellent point! I was working full time, and studying full time, then went to a class per semester to finish my BA just because my class and work schedule did not work out together. Nobody ever asked me how come I only took one class at a time. I want to say it should not be a concern at all!

It isn't a concern if you've already shown you can handle a full course load. It's when you're trying to redeem a rocky academic history that you need to think about how you're going to prove you can do well under a heavy curriculum.

 

To the OP, bear in mind that on CASPA your work history and your academic history are kept separately. You might consider slipping it into your personal statement that your were working 30 hours a week while taking a wicked course load.  I agree that this is something they should consider but I would not trust adcoms to put those two things together on their own just from looking at your application.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Similar Content

    • By chrissy88
      As a recently graduated student going into her gap year, I have a question for those who have been in my same situation. My undergrad GPA is below the normal average for an admitted student into a PA program. I am planning on enrolling in post-bacc classes in order to meet some pre-reqs for certain schools, and just to raise my GPA overall and hopefully show admissions committees that I have grown since my first couple years of college (the years that hurt my cGPA). But, how do you all do it? I am planning on being a CNA, but I can't work day shift due to classes that normally occur during daytime hours. I've thought about trying to get 12 hour shifts so I have a few days off during the week to sneak some classes in. I can work PMs or nights, but I'm worried about being too exhausted going straight from a night shift into classes the next day. Community colleges cater to working students by offering online and night classes which would be super helpful, but do many PA schools look down on community college coursework? I'm stressing out thinking about how this is all going to play out so any words of advice or personal stories would be super appreciated. Thanks in advance and good luck with applications!!
    • By sharpsabresword
      After a while of revising my priorities and passions, I have lead myself to know that I want to become a PA. However, at this very moment I am in a pickle. I go to UCLA but do not want to continue here. I have my first year done (11 classes)  with a good gpa at 3.75. However, this year almost killed me to get that not perfect gpa. Likewise, I have few hours working in the medical field and need to rack up some more hours. My next year if I continue at UCLA will load on more classes with no buffer, I am certain that my gpa will suffer and continue to fall do to the sheer amount of grade deflation. I fear it will drop below a 3.5 easily. Likewise, I will have no time to pick up hours or get any experience due  to constantly studying on the quarter system.
      My other option is to transfer to my local community college and finish up prerequisites there and then transfer after two years to UC Davis on a tag agreement (basically if your gpa is high enough in certain classes you get guaranteed admission). If I did this route I would take the phlebotomy certification class this summer and try to get a job while I complete my two years at a cc.
      I am trying to exit undergrad in the best position to apply to PA school even if I need to work an extra year to get more experience. I am not quite sure what to do. Any advice? Will PA programs look negatively upon Community college prerequisites even if some were done at a four year with good marks?
    • By yhkim1992
      Dear, whom may it concerns!
       
      Hi, I am 24 years old female who is truly considering to become a PA. I am senior in 4 year University and having low GPA right now.
      I have a questions to make sure before i put my records into Caspa system.
       
      Q1: I transferred from Community college to 4-years university. Since I was transferring from my Cc to 4year university, they counted my A grade from cc as B grade in university. When I imput My GPA to CASPA system, i am not sure which grade I should input. Does CASPA has some kind of policies like this?

      Q2: I am currently senior but it is my 5th year due to changing my major in the junior year. Which year level should my 5th year fall into?


      Q3: in case of need of raising gpa, i would like to first graduate from my current 4yr university and continue taking extra classes at Different community college because I did not get good GPA compared to CC's GPA. Will this credits and gpa also be counted and accumulated?
       
      (CC GPA WITH 60 CREDIT is 3.6 and Univ GPA WITH 80 CREDIT is 2.5)

      If not, i will have to delay my graduation date, so i can take more classes before getting Bachelor's degree. I need clarification to determine whether i should delay my graduation or not.

      Lastly, which year level would this fall into? Is this post bachelor's?

      I understand this is somewhat overwhelming questions, please help me to minimize any errors while updating my transcript to Caspa.

      Thank you very much,
       
      -anonymous
    • By FutureNYPA
      I finished my undergraduate degree last year with a B.S. in Accounting and Information Systems (May 2014). I am currently 23 years old and turning 24 end of this calendar year. I am working with a Big 4 accounting firm for nearly a year now doing management consulting and am quite unhappy with this line of work. My undergraduate GPA in Accounting and MIS was about a 3.4 from a top public university in the northeastern US.
       
      I would ideally like to go into PA school and work towards becoming a Physician Assistant. I have had years of clinical experience as an EMT on an ambulance and as a hospital volunteer in the ER- several thousand hours. However, while my B.S. is in Accounting and IT, my only 2 prereq's are General Biology and Statistics, both taken at a community college (both were A's). To take the remaining 8-10 prereq's (since it depends on the PA school itself), I would have to really do this at a community college due to time constraints while working FT. With this being said, if I completed ALL of my prereq's at a community college, would this impact negatively when applying to PA school? There are no good universities near me and I can't take on the expense of going away somewhere for only a few prerequisite classes.
    • By PALois
      I don't know if this has been asked before, but I will ask anyway since I really need some advice. Long story short, I took Anatomy and physiology I at a community college the first time and received a C and I also received a Withdraw in Anatomy and Physiology II. 
       
      I will be transferring to a 4-year university this Fall 2015 as a junior and I am not sure if I should just retake Anatomy and Physiology at the University where it is offered as separate courses or if I should just retake them at the same community college again while I am enrolled at the university. 
       
       
      I asked the PA programs I want to apply to and they have no preference on where you take your courses; however I am just worried that it will hinder my application to be taking community college courses while I am enrolled at a university since it may look like I am taking the easy way out. 
       
      Any advice? Thanks! 
       
       
      - Kate 
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More