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Hey guys, so it may be a bit premature to think about this. But first: I am currently a PA student, almost done with my didactic year (3 more months to go!). I entered the PA program straight from undergrad, currently 22 yo. The only HCE I had prior to beginning the program was working as a lab assistant for a year while finishing up undergraduate studies. I also had some rotation experience to different labs as a student pursuing medical laboratory technologist degree. And roughly 400 hours of volunteering experience. I am still currently working as a lab assistant in a big metropolitan hospital in hopes that the current connection I have can help me in the future in job prospectives or even the residency their ER offers. I've passed all my classes so far and hope to continue to do so, current grades slightly above 3.5.

 

Recently, I realized after talking with the faculty that in terms of finding a job or even a residency (which I am currently leaning towards), it would be difficult for someone who has a lack of HCE prior to entering the PA program (I don't really count the lab assistant as good HCE due to lack of patient exposure). I was quite elated and happy that I got accepted with minimal HCE, but now I just realized that it may affect me in the future. Of course I may be a bit pessimistic about all of this, and heck things might change drastically once I enter clinical year.

 

I just wanted to get some insight from differnent individuals who may have had the same concerns as I did prior to clinicals or graduating. One of the main reasons why I'm leaning towards an ER residency is due to my lack of HCE plus it's a great additional teaching experience for anyone trying to go the ER route. What do you guys think are the chances of actually attaining a residency or even a job?

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Job prospects are good -- I had even less HCE and volunteering hours than you did and had a job offer before I even graduated.  Try not to stress :) there are plenty of opportunities.  Fellowships tend to be more competitive and look more closely at your transcripts from school and experience (this is me hearing from friends in residencies), but I don't necessarily think it would preclude you from being invited to interview to see how good of a fit you would be. 

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Thanks for your reply! The residencies are definitely one of my top goals of doing after graduating, but most of residency start dates don't align with my graduation date. I'm trying to contact some people from different residencies in hopes they can give me both insight and advice

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if you are serious about emergency medicine, a residency would be an excellent idea regardless of your background. there are now 20 and they are all over. see the sticky at the top of the em forum. they pay a living wage and the skills you get will set you up for your entire career.

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Hey guys, so it may be a bit premature to think about this. But first: I am currently a PA student, almost done with my didactic year (3 more months to go!). I entered the PA program straight from undergrad, currently 22 yo. The only HCE I had prior to beginning the program was working as a lab assistant for a year while finishing up undergraduate studies. I also had some rotation experience to different labs as a student pursuing medical laboratory technologist degree. And roughly 400 hours of volunteering experience. I am still currently working as a lab assistant in a big metropolitan hospital in hopes that the current connection I have can help me in the future in job prospectives or even the residency their ER offers. I've passed all my classes so far and hope to continue to do so, current grades slightly above 3.5.

 

Recently, I realized after talking with the faculty that in terms of finding a job or even a residency (which I am currently leaning towards), it would be difficult for someone who has a lack of HCE prior to entering the PA program (I don't really count the lab assistant as good HCE due to lack of patient exposure). I was quite elated and happy that I got accepted with minimal HCE, but now I just realized that it may affect me in the future. Of course I may be a bit pessimistic about all of this, and heck things might change drastically once I enter clinical year.

 

I just wanted to get some insight from differnent individuals who may have had the same concerns as I did prior to clinicals or graduating. One of the main reasons why I'm leaning towards an ER residency is due to my lack of HCE plus it's a great additional teaching experience for anyone trying to go the ER route. What do you guys think are the chances of actually attaining a residency or even a job?[/quote

 

Def don't stress! If you are going into family practice I wouldn't worry. Anything else I would strongly recommend a residency. This is especially true of ED medicine. So many new grads go in and have no idea what they are doing. We simply are not trained to perform well in a busy ED...it's a steep learning curve

 

 

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Thanks for the reply guys. It is true, I am overthinking it a tad too much. I've been scouring the site for a year past now and I've seen possibly all the EM residency posts, including your sticky EMEDPA. It's definitely a field I want to dive in. But, as others noted multiple times, it's not an easy one to just dive fresh from graduating. In fact, it is rare to see an ER in this neck of the woods giving job opportunities to a fresh graduate. In any case, thanks for clarifying the matter guys. I'll keep lurking around here even after I graduate.

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If your HCE is lacking, pay attention to the job offers you may get from rotations.  If they give you a job offer, your resume doesn't matter to them since they've seen you work.  In other contexts, your prior HCE may matter a LOT more.

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