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I was wondering if anyone in ortho can give me an idea of what a routine day is like in clinic? Pre and post op visit? Asses and Dx various MSK conditions? Joint Injections? Splinting and cutting off cast?  Is it possible for ortho PAs to help with clinic and rounding on hospital patients and not be involved in surgery? Thanks!

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I was wondering if anyone in ortho can give me an idea of what a routine day is like in clinic? Pre and post op visit? Asses and Dx various MSK conditions? Joint Injections? Splinting and cutting off cast?  Is it possible for ortho PAs to help with clinic and rounding on hospital patients and not be involved in surgery? Thanks!

 

Yes it is possible to be an Ortho PA and not be involved in surgery. At my prior Ortho job I worked with a hand surgeon and saw all new, follow-up, post-op, and work-comp patients. I did all the casting and splinting for fractures. I also provided steroid injections for trigger fingers, dequervain's tenosynovitis, arthritis, and tennis elbow, etc. I did not assist in surgery.  

At my current job, I am a General Surgical Ortho PA, meaning I see all hand, elbow, shoulder, hip, and knee conditions. I also first assist in surgery which includes total knee and hip replacements, etc. Including hand surgery. I usually round on patients for a couple hours in the morning and the rest of the day I see patients. I am in the OR about 1-2 times per week. I absolutely love what I do. My co-worker chooses to be in clinic and rounds on patients as well. She chooses to not be involved in surgery. This also depends on who you work for. When applying for a job it is important to voice whether or not your want to be in the OR.  

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