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Emory is my first choice school and I'm willing to wait an extra year to get more experience if needed.

 

 

Age at application: 25

 

Bachelor's in Environmental studies and Religious Studies from Guilford College: 3.83 GPA

undergraduate science pre-reqs completed post-graduation: 3.5 GPA

 

Direct patient care exp: volunteer and paid EMT-intermediate- 2500 hrs; about 200 hours shadowing a PA, and 2000 hours as a home aid with the elderly (personal care, memory loss care, ...should I even include this?)

 

GRE: not yet taken, I don't tend to be great at standardized tests though (not terrible either)

 

Other: mostly fluent in Spanish, vice president of Guilford Peace Society during undergrad & active w/other non-medical clubs at school.

 

 

What are my chances? What could I spend a year doing to make my application "pop"? Thanks!

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