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Nurse writes an article on NP vs PA debate


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Attached is an article written by a Nurse with a doctorate of nursing science. Since I see so many talk about how negative nurses are about PAs, which I personally don't see often, I thought it would be nice for all to see how one institution sees them as equals and advocates for both practicing at the top of their license.

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It is a very degrading and pompus article. First off there  i love how it is stated "An increasing number of nurse leaders are finding
themselves in the position of having to debate the
relative merits of NPs and PAs and to resolvewhether
one or both disciplines will play a role in their organizations." So i guess now our hiring as PAs is determined by "nurse leaders". and lets not forget, "their training is equivalent to ours", because being trained in nursing is equal to being trained in medicine. this article is a joke and just a way for the NP front to flex thier muscle.

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Fixed! Apparently you have to browse, upload, AND THEN hit attach to post. Sorry it's my first attachment.

 

Thanks so much for taking the time to post the article- I think its the first time anyone has attached a file to a post on this new BB system, so don't feel bad!

 

I think the article is pretty fair. Might be a slight bit on the arrogant side about "nursing leaders" determining which of us (PA vs NP) get hired for a particular system, but overall the article's pretty even-handed.

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Thanks so much for taking the time to post the article- I think its the first time anyone has attached a file to a post on this new BB system, so don't feel bad!

 

I think the article is pretty fair. Might be a slight bit on the arrogant side about "nursing leaders" determining which of us (PA vs NP) get hired for a particular system, but overall the article's pretty even-handed.

While a nurse wrote this, I don't think they decided. Certain departments favored certain providers, this particular case oncology was ruled by nurses. Other departments (inpatient services) were ruled by PA, and only MD and Chief PA were involved in the hiring. At the highest level, they decided to make postings for both and let the best candidate win, and the nurse admin from oncology just wrote the paper.

 

At least this is was I understand from the article.

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I'm reading between the lines here, but this is how I'd paraphrase what I picked up:

 

"So we realized that by exclusively hiring and/or promoting experienced unionized NPs, it's costing us $20k/yr more per head in each position by default. Since we've been displaying a blind preference for hiring NPs (or not reading PA applications) out of self-protection, and we're now under budgetary pressure to fit inside a budget, this study will allow us some wiggle room to hire PAs where we want to save money. We don't really know how to assign them onto teams (after all, we're nurse leaders, and don't know enough about these mysterious PAs, except that we still can't get the name right in our data table -- it's Physician's Assistant, right?), but we'll think of something. Basically we're saying that PAs probably won't kill our patients as much as we've been saying for the past few years, but we need more data. These PAs will work cheaper on our pay scale, so we'll give 'em a shot."

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It is a very degrading and pompus article. First off there  i love how it is stated "An increasing number of nurse leaders are finding

themselves in the position of having to debate the

relative merits of NPs and PAs and to resolvewhether

one or both disciplines will play a role in their organizations." So i guess now our hiring as PAs is determined by "nurse leaders". and lets not forget, "their training is equivalent to ours", because being trained in nursing is equal to being trained in medicine. this article is a joke and just a way for the NP front to flex thier muscle.

Completely agree... Seemed VERY nursing centric as if we as PAs are somehow just "good enough" to be allowed to practice at the same level of an APRN - it's ridiculous. Compare ANY accredited PA program curriculum to an APRN curriculum (masters and doctorate alike) and its absoutely undebatable that PAs have significantly more extensive and superior training.

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