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@HopefulTC-- I still haven't heard anything about an interview or not either, but I know at other interviews I've had I met people who have had them already. I think their program has been exceptionally rude in not getting back to applicants with either a flat out rejection or an interview invite. I know I personally submitted my CASPA app in early May 2013, and literally have not received anything besides a follow up email shortly after that that stated they would contact us late fall if we were invited for an interview with their program. At this point, I personally do not care because I have already interviewed at every other program I applied to, and have been offered acceptances to a few, so either way don't plan on going there, even if I were to be offered an interview invite today. That said, I think it says a lot about their administration and the lack of respect that they have for their applicants. Good luck to you though. 

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If you want to see exceptionally rude administration, try to talk with the pcom administrators. They really treat you like a zero. (Not even a real number)

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