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I'm only 2 months into my PA program. I've read things before in here about PA's being able to do residencies and I'm getting interested in that. What are the steps for applying for one? In what areas can PA's do a residency/for how long? Do GPA requirements vary?

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You should check out http://www.appap.org

they have all the info u are looking for

like GPA requirements, deadlines to apply, stipend they pay u for the program(usually $45-50,000 for 12 months), the type of specialty they offer and anything else u want to. Hope u find something ur interested in on there

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You should check out www.appap.org

they have all the info u are looking for

like GPA requirements, deadlines to apply, stipend they pay u for the program(usually $45-50,000 for 12 months), the type of specialty they offer and anything else u want to. Hope u find something ur interested in on there

 

Thank you very much that's very helpful! I'm surprised there aren't as many residency programs as I was expecting!

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I would say there aren't that many because a lot of P. A.'s get job offers right out of school and you know many surgeons prefer to train the P. A.'s they hire to their own style and also the money because you get offered more than $45,000/year just coming out of school and you are also going to get training so I think more P. A.'s prefer on the job training. But personally I'm considering doing a residency when I get to that point in my career. Did u notice how small the class sizes are for the residency programs????

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Yes I did, you're quite right! I've talked to PA's who got excellent training on their jobs, but I think a residency might still be a nice thing to have, maybe later on during the career? We'll see what happens..

 

I would say there aren't that many because a lot of P. A.'s get job offers right out of school and you know many surgeons prefer to train the P. A.'s they hire to their own style and also the money because you get offered more than $45,000/year just coming out of school and you are also going to get training so I think more P. A.'s prefer on the job training. But personally I'm considering doing a residency when I get to that point in my career. Did u notice how small the class sizes are for the residency programs????

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Yes I did, you're quite right! I've talked to PA's who got excellent training on their jobs, but I think a residency might still be a nice thing to have, maybe later on during the career? We'll see what happens..

on the job training is not always comprehensive like a residency. they train you to do what they want you to do. if that is not full scope of practice care then you are missing out on a big subset of skills. in emergency medicine for example it is unlikely a first job will teach you how to see really sick pts with a high degree of autonomy.

if I was graduating today I would do a residency right out of school. I would apply to 5 or so and If I didn't get in would apply again 1 yr later. seriously. it is going to be that important in the future within the span of your career if you are a new grad today.

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I have always been set on doing an EM residency when I graduate. As a former paramedic, I know the value of a residency when it comes to working in emergency medicine as you need such a vast knowledge base and procedural experience before diving in and the extra year in residency would def be a plus. I do have a concern that there is a high possibility I may not get into one. From what I see on the appap website is that there are currently 9 EM residencies in the US, with each accepting 2-3 applicants at the most. I will be applying to Einstein, Weill-Cornell, and Arrowhead in CA (those are my top choices) and more than likely a few more, but does anyone have any general advice on getting me a leg up?

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there are 19 em programs currently accepting applications..they are in a link here in the em residency section forum.

some programs don't even fill. apply to 3-5 and you will get into one.http://www.physicianassistantforum.com/forums/showthread.php/2159-Emergency-Medicine-Links-Residencies

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I completely agree with u EMEDPA. That's why I'm going to do a residency when I graduate. But I would like to know the answer to this question. Do you feel that EM is the best place to get experience especially in diagnosing and treating over other specialties because you get to see a wide range of different patients with different symptoms. It seems to me that an EM PA is pretty experienced in diagnosing and treating than all the other specialties and can work with little to no supervision most of the time

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I think EM is the best at stabilization, and pretty good at Dx. Best diagnosticians are in Internal medicine and certainly better at treatment, IMO. Not that EM isn't smart enough, just think about how often they have to deal with patients long term.

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in a truly emergent situation though with an unstable pt with no access, no airway, etc you don't want the internist, you want the em provider.

I have heard of a team of internists trying to get blood gases on pts in full arrest while no one does cpr...

sure, once they are stabilized and have a ddx with 15 things on it the internist is better at doing that workup.

and if we are going to look at inpt studs I would mention the intensivist over the general floor internist every time.

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What is the quality of the PA residency programs? Are they well supervised, like the physician residency programs?

yup, at some places they are run alongside md residencies with the pa in a pgy-1 slot , at other places it is similar but no md residency there, at others it is a separate track but still high quality. all 19 on the list are excellent. I have met the program directors for most of them and/or grads of most of them. would not hesitate to do any of them.

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What about Family medicine residency? I haven't seen much of these on the website!

 

Why would a PA need a Family Med residency? Primary Care is what we are designed and trained for. A residency in FM is an exercise in redundancy.

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[quote=EMEDPA;396274

I have heard of a team of internists trying to get blood gases on pts in full arrest while no one does cpr...

 

As a PA student I personally witnessed an internist order a 12-lead on an asystolic cardiac arrest. Myself and my co-PA student on the rotation were medics, and we stood next to the "leader" offering management suggestions ("how about an epi?)

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Very vague description of the program, and no listing of rotations that would go into a "primary care residency"...makes me very suspect.

 

IMHO, if you can't step into a primary care setting straight out of PA school and at least begin to function, then PA school has failed you. Not saying you're gonna hit the ground running, but you should at least know where to start.

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Very vague description of the program, and no listing of rotations that would go into a "primary care residency"...makes me very suspect.

 

IMHO, if you can't step into a primary care setting straight out of PA school and at least begin to function, then PA school has failed you. Not saying you're gonna hit the ground running, but you should at least know where to start.

I think this residency is basically a mechanism to train folks to work in the VA model so after a year they will be fully up to speed on the needs of that setting and able to function there.

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I think this residency is basically a mechanism to train folks to work in the VA model so after a year they will be fully up to speed on the needs of that setting and able to function there.

 

Understandable....just maybe I bristle at the idea of calling it a "residency" if it's just to help people learn the VA's way of doing things, rather than an actual specialty that PA school doesn't already prepare you for.

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I think this residency is basically a mechanism to train folks to work in the VA model so after a year they will be fully up to speed on the needs of that setting and able to function there.

 

Yes, I think Emory has a similar VA residency with the same intent.

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Does doing a residency change your earning potential or autonomy any more than on the job training? Anyone speaking from experience having done a residency and seen the benefits in practice?

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Does doing a residency change your earning potential or autonomy any more than on the job training? Anyone speaking from experience having done a residency and seen the benefits in practice?

 

I can't speak to the hiring perspective, other than that there is a vague consensus that a residency is equal to about 5 years of "on-the-job" experience.

 

When I finished my residency, I was given a good deal of autonomy in decision-making and in procedures- part of this, admittedly, is that I was hired on where I did my residency. I did start off as a higher salary, but have yet to test that with an entirely new environment. I am hoping, when I do go on to my next job, that having done a residency + an additional 3.5 yrs of experience will equal autonomy as well as a big salary increase (along with a change in locale, which will pay better anyway). It'll be really hard to say whether a salary increase will be due to my residency or the fact that I'll have 5 yrs of experience as a PA in my specialty, which is generally where it is felt PA's become comfortable and competent in their specialty.

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