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Found 55 results

  1. Hello! I'm currently a PA-S2 at a 33 month program and about to soon go on rotations. From the start, I knew I wanted to go into surgery, it was just deciding which subspecialty I wanted to go into. After doing a lot of research and searching through the forums, I have a couple of programs in mind that sound absolutely amazing, one of them being the Yale program. Does anyone who have gone through a surgical residency or know people who have any insight on what kind of applicants they are looking for? From what I've gathered from posts on ER residencies, ADCOMS look at: - GPA - LORs - General interest in the specialty: prior experience, rotations during clinical year - Personal Statement and the interview Is it fair to say it is similar to what surgical residency programs are looking for? Fortunately, my program is contracted with Norwalk Hospital at Yale where the residency is located and I am definitely will be rotating through there for my general surgery rotation in the coming months. Thanks again for all your advice! ?
  2. I started a new job in orthopedic surgery 4 months ago with an orthopedic surgical group. Some of the surgeons allow residents to train under them in the OR and clinic. So far, the residents have been cool and I’ve learned some stuff from them. However, I sometimes get the sense I am jockeying for position as the first assist. Ultimately, my role is to assist the primary surgeon. For instance, during shoulder scopes the resident will stand at the head of patient (lateral positioning), then the surgeon, and then I’m towards the feet of the patient. I noticed I’m pretty useless down there. Last week, I was respectfully assertive and stood at the head so I could actually assist. Total joints are a different story...I’m across from the surgeon and the resident is next to the surgeon by the head. My question is, what should my approach be? Should I appropriately establish myself as first assist? The resident and I will sometimes switch as to who is the main assist. I’ve also found myself be a little more in tune with opportunities to be steps ahead of the primary surgeon ready to be there to assist the next move...but I’m not in the main position and I watch the resident miss an opportunity. I would imagine that as I gain more experience and earn the trust of the surgeons, maybe my role will be more clear? I want to do my job well but not be a d***. Any orthopedic PAs or surgical PAs work with residents in the OR? How do handle things?
  3. Thumper was a respondent on the Becker site and "Optimal" in this setting refers to optimal exceeded workloads which many of us have. Not unlike Thumper, I agree that this is an issue that has ramifications such as this study but affects many more caregivers such as the different techs, nursing assistants, PAs and NPs in the hospital setting and emergency room clinicians as well as surgical staff, including the surgeons themselves. The nurses are the first to suffer as a large group as they are understaffed and instead of a 6:1 ratio of nurse to patient, a night shift nurse can have a 16:1. Did the patients magically change their admitting diagnosis or are these the same patients with the same problem and the addition of poor sleep in their surroundings compounded with post-operative pain. They are under-treated, seen ,perhaps twice a shift,even if they are hitting the call button. From a NA standpoint,patients are not turned, properly fed or soiled beds or diapers are not changed adding to skin and soft tissue breakdown and decubitus ulcers. The nurse needs to be "The Flash" to dispense medications and these type of errors can be deadly. Yes, personnel costs money but the litigation's and need for additional time in the hospital at its own expense is far more. My mother-in-law was a DON at three hospitals and found this happening in all three and was frustrated by administrations refusal to hire more people. Surgical personnel are more scarce because so few are trained in this discipline and it is not unusual for a surgical nurse, surgical technologist, surgical PA or NP and the surgeon themselves to work more than 80 hours to a hundred hours per week. Let me prove this as a malpractice attorney and I would have a field day of serving the institution and the caregivers who legally are working while intoxicated due to lack of sleep. Do we really care? If these providers started a pact and documented these atrocities ,hospitals would be put out of business. As a PA who cares, I would join the pact because our patients are failing because of lack of revenue to pay employees but fat paychecks for administrators.
  4. rrasbe1

    Surgical PA Schedule Structure

    Surgical PAs! I'm curious to know how your schedules are structured. I'm hoping to gain insight on how similar practices operate and hopefully create a more efficient structure for my own group. I'm currently part of a hospital based neurosurgery group consisting of 7 PAs and 7 surgeons (when fully staffed, + 2 surgeons who are there part time). We also have a residency program. PA responsibilities include call (6a-6p), inpatient, clinic, and OR. We work 4 days a week with a rotating day off to keep us under/near 50 hours/week, and 1/8 Saturdays. We are, as a whole, looking for a more 1:1 relationship with a physician to improve continuity/sanity and gain autonomy by predominately working with one doc. I have thought about how to accomplish this for hours upon hours, but run into significant road blocks each time. I'd love some fresh perspective! Thanks in advance.
  5. Although I’m not a PA yet, I hope posting in this forum is fine, as I’m seeking info on existing surgical PA’s. So, what’s your specialty? I’m very interested in surgery, but I also would like to have a decent lifestyle outside of work. I’d also prefer to do more lower-risk surgeries versus something like trauma patients. The only PA I know personally specializes in urology. She works a normal schedule, is married, and has a child. I love the aspect of surgery, the idea of savings lives, and even working weekends when they need me - I hope I don’t give off the vibe that I don’t want to work. Any PA’s out there in surgery that care to comment on your work-life balance? Any insight is very appreciated!
  6. Hi, everyone. I’m going to attempt becoming a PA and need some advice. I have a good idea on what I’ll be doing to attempt getting into programs, so I’ll go ahead and give you my estimated credentials when applying to a program, sometime in the next 4 years. Bachelor of Science in Psychology with a minor in Health Sciences from Arizona State University. 3.6 GPA Standard GRE scores (haven’t taken any yet, but to play it safe, I’ll just say I’ve hypothetically scored average or slightly above average) Surgical Technician degree from a local technical college with ~ 2,000 hours clinical experience with ~ 500 hours of volunteer hospital-related work. Seeking to become a Surgical Physician Assistant. My main concern is that I’ll be attending ASU Online. I live in Georgia, so I’m sure the topic will be brought up and if I moved here, took online classes, etc. I’m completely content with online classes and don’t think they’ll harm my chances. I’ve inquired to PA programs near me, and they have all said they accept online programs like I’m pursuing, but that doesn’t let me know if someone would be deemed more competitive if they had similar credentials as me but in a physical campus. For my labs (required for PA program acceptance), I will actually have to fly out of state and attend those in person in an accelerated fashion specifically designed for out of state online students, so I’m still getting that physical lab presence, and it’s from a highly respected university. With all that being said, I currently have a job in aviation with a Fortune 500 company - I know, totally different world. My point is that I make really good money for my age. I’m 24 and made a little over $60,000 last year, which is very good in Georgia. So I don’t want to leave my current job to pursue school in a more traditional sense. I’m actually attending two colleges simultaneously - the local tech college for my Surgical Technician degree and ASU. I’ve just started on my ST program, which will take about 18 months. In this time, I can continue to go to ASU Online, work towards my bachelor’s, and save up as much money as possible from my job. After I complete the ST program, I’ll leave my current job to gain some clinical experience. I’ll have about 2-3 years left for me to finish my bachelors, which will give me plenty of time to rack up those required clinical hours. Sorry to rant, but I just wanted to get everything out there in a single post. Do you guys think I’m on the right track? How do you feel about me getting an online degree from ASU while simultaneously working for clinical experience? Does getting a degree part-time look less competitive than someone who’s going to college full time? How do you feel about my credentials? Answers to any questions are highly appreciated! Thanks again.
  7. Postoperative Wound Monitoring App Can Reduce Readmissions and Improve Patient Care Patients gave universally positive feedback about the app’s ease of use and the ability to have wounds monitored CHICAGO (January 19, 2018): A new smartphone app called WoundCare is successfully enabling patients to remotely send images of their surgical wounds for monitoring by nurses. The app was developed by researches from the Wisconsin Institute of Surgical Outcomes Research (WiSOR), Department of Surgery, University of Wisconsin, Madison, with the goal of earlier detection of surgical site infections (SSIs) and prevention of hospital readmissions. The study results appear as an “article in press” on the website of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons ahead of print. WoundCheck is a HIPAA-compliant, user-tested iOS app that enables patients to transmit daily surgical wound images from their home to a clinician. Image courtesy of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. SSIs are the most common hospital-acquired infection and the leading cause of hospital readmission following an operation.1,2,3 Due to the prevalence off SSIs, the WiSOR research team decided to see if postoperative wound monitoring could be effectively achieved by having patients upload photos through the WoundCare app and answer a few brief questions to gather information not easily captured through images. “Patients cannot identify [infections] and frequently ignore or fail to recognize the early signs of cellulitis or other wound complications,” study authors wrote. “This drawback leads to the common and frustrating scenario where patients present to a routine, scheduled clinic appointment with an advanced wound complication that requires readmission, with or without reoperation. However, the complication may have been amenable to outpatient management if detected earlier.” Forty vascular surgery patients were enrolled in the study. There was an overall data submission rate of 90.2 percent among participants, and submissions were reviewed within an average of 9.7 hours. During the study, seven wound complications were detected and one false negative was found. “We set out to come up with a protocol where patients could become active participants in their care and allow us to be in closer communication and monitor their wounds after they leave the hospital,” said lead study author and general surgery resident Rebecca L. Gunter, MD. . “This approach allows us to intervene at an earlier time rather than waiting for patients to come back in after the problem has already developed past the point of being able to manage it on an outpatient basis.” Patients were enthusiastic about the app’s ease of use and the reassurance they felt having their wounds regularly monitored. The nurse practitioners responsible for reviewing the submitted images attested to the value of the photos and patient satisfaction, although they also noted it was difficult to find time to review the submitted images on top of an already heavy clinical workload. Study authors note that the success and sustainability of a post-discharge wound-monitoring protocol requires a dedicated transitional care program and not simply adding a task to the current staff workload. This protocol also has a cost-savings component, in addition to the patient safety and satisfaction aspects. Study authors note that SSIs are the most expensive hospital-acquired infection, costing an average of nearly $30,000 per wound-related readmission and an estimated $3-10 billion annually. “If you could imagine saving the cost from the number of patients whose readmission you were able to prevent, that result could provide significant savings to the health system,” Dr. Gunter said. Although capturing specific numbers related to cost-savings was not part of this study, Dr. Gunter said it is an important area of focus for future studies. A limitation to telemedicine protocols that call for the use of smartphones is that not every patient has the necessary technology or knowledge to upload images on their own. The WiSOR research team addressed this issue by having participants undergo tailored training to learn to use the WoundCheck app. They provided each patient with an iPhone 5S and an accompanying visual reference guide to further assist in using the phone and app. Dr. Gunter said they were very successful in giving patients knowledge and access to technology so they could participate in the study. She said this is a model easily adaptable to other medical centers, whether through providing participants with a phone, having a rotating supply of phones at the hospitals for patients to borrow, or relying on a patient’s personal device. “We have demonstrated that a population of complex and high-risk patients, many of whom are older adults and novice smartphone users, can complete this protocol with high fidelity and satisfaction,” the researchers concluded. Study coauthors from the University of Wisconsin, Madison, include Sara Fernandes-Taylor, PhD, Shahrose Rahman, BS, Lola Awoyinka, MPH, Kyla M. Bennett, MD, Sharon M. Weber, MD, FACS, Caprice C. Greenberg, MD, MPH, FACS, and K. Craig Kent, MD, FACS. “FACS” designates that a surgeon is a Fellow of the American College of Surgeons. Support for this study came from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: AHRQ R21 HS023395. Dr. Gunter is supported by the National Institutes of Health: NIH T32 HL110853. This study was presented at the 13th Annual Academic Surgical Congress, Las Vegas, Nev., February 2017. Citation: Feasibility of an Image-Based Mobile Health Protocol for Postoperative Wound Monitoring. Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Available at: http://www.journalacs.org/article/S1072-7515(17)32152-X/abstract. __________________ Wiseman JT, Guzman AM, Fernandes-Taylor S, et al. General and vascular surgery readmissions: a systematic review. J Am Coll Surg 2014;219:552-569.e2. Weber DJ, Sickbert-Bennett EE, Brown V, et al. Completeness of surveillance data reported by the National Healthcare Safety Network: an analysis of healthcare-associated infections ascertained in a tertiary care hospital, 2010. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2012;33:94-96. Lewis SS, Moehring RW, Chen LF, et al. Assessing the relative burden of hospital-acquired infections in a network of community hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2013;34:1229-1230. Chapter Robert M. Blumm, MA, PA, PA-C Emeritus, DFAAPA The year 2017 was an amazing chapter in our lives with many changes in leadership, politics, healthcare, the advancement of both the NP and PA professions, tremendously increased knowledge in medical education, the loss of at least twenty-five international personalities and, for a number of us, a year of unprecedented medical litigations due to medical errors, the traps of an EMR, informed consents and failure to diagnose. We have gained much in the ability to enter new fields of interest and to become pioneers in specialties, but all of this has a cost. We always will pay a price to gain a prize. We are now writing the first few pages of a new chapter with the hopes of improving our personal skills, our professional achievements, our outcomes with our patients and our overall success in life and in the marketplace. “The new year stands before us, like a chapter in a book, waiting to be written. We can help write that story by setting goals.” Melody Beattie In order to set goals, it is essential to know the facts and change the outcomes or the injury created by a faulty outcome. CM&F insures 12,000 NPs and PAs and serves them with diligence, respect, and instant access. With OPA becoming the buzz word for PAs in this new year, it is my hope that PAs with an eye toward future independent practice will become aware of the absolute need to have a personal liability insurance policy as offered by CM&F as the endorsed group for the AAPA. This could have an extremely favorable impact on premiums for PAs. There are so many positive aspects of independent practice for NPs, but payouts for malpractice claims filed against NPs are on the rise, according to a new report. The average payout was $240,471 according to studies from CNA Insurance which covers NP malpractice insurance. The highest area of claims is neonatal, which at only 1% of the claims was $630,411. Obstetrics, another high-risk area, had indemnities that averaged $417,500. The lowest of the three was emergency medicine with indemnities averaging $277,812. Though those three specialties accounted for the costliest claims, the vast majority of closed claims were related to four other specialties: adult primary care, family practice, behavioral health, and gerontology. It is surprising, as well as a hidden trap, that most of these were related to a failure to order a medical test or obtain an address that test result.* As I mentioned earlier, knowledge of the facts can dramatically change the outcome; the meticulous attention of the provider is essential. So my fellow colleagues, how will we write the 2018 chapter of our history? We can all hope for a greater future with less misadventure, fewer litigations, and healthier patients. But we must engage with the conscious reminder that we are caregivers and we are, therefore, vulnerable. Why carry that vulnerability on our own shoulders when the fear, anxiety, and burden can be shouldered by personal liability insurance? How empowering is the knowledge that we are protected from potential errors by specialists who are experienced fighters in this field of litigation? What do you believe? What price are you willing to pay to obtain security and peace? “Beliefs have the power to create and the power to destroy. Human beings have the awesome ability to take any experience of their lives and create a meaning that dis-empowers them or one that can literally save their lives.” Tony Robbins. Let us join hands together and make the latter choice. * Source- CNA and Nurses Services Organization (2017, October). CNA and NSO Nurse Practitioner Claim Report (4th Edition): A Guide to Identifying and Addressing Professional Liability Exposures, page 12. Retrieved from https://www.nso.com/Learning/Artifacts/Claim-Reports/Nurse-Practitioner-Claim-Report-4th-Edition-A-Guide-to-Identifying-and-Addressing-Professional-Liability-Exposures. -- Robert M. Blumm, MA, PA,PA-C Emeritus, DFAAPA Surgical PA, National Conference Speaker, Author, Suture Workshop Director, Former AAPA Liaison to American College of Surgeons, Past President four National Associations, Editorial Board Clinician1.com, Advisory Board POCN., AFPPANP Treasurer Information about my suture video. Information about upcoming live suture workshop
  8. http://www.beckersspine.com/spine/item/24235-the-role-of-the-pa-today-5-thoughts-from-spine-surgeons.html
  9. Has anyone here used NEJM Knowledge Plus to get CME? What is the best CME sources for surgery/trauma/critical care that doesn't cost an arm and a leg plus my left kidney? Thanks
  10. Hey guys! I hear a lot about the autonomy of dermatology PAs and I hear them talk about doing injections on their own and minor surgeries. I also hear about psych PAs saying they do everything the doc does. But I was wondering if there are other specialties out there that allow for this when it comes to being hands on. Or is it basically only a derm thing? I love the whole body and am thinking I'd be more suited for family, emergency, or internal medicine or something along those lines but I'm open to learning about all that PAs can do! Especially because I'd like to be hands on. Do you know any plastics PAs or are you yourself one? I'd like to become more informed about the wonderful PA profession! Thanks everyone!
  11. Hello all! I am one of the current PA Fellows at Texas Children's Hospital. I wanted to post on here to make myself available to answer any questions about our program or post-graduate training in general. We do a lot of promotion within the TCH marketing/hr world, so here are some of our postings: http://www.texaschildrensblog.org/2015/06/a-fellowship-of-opportunity/ http://texaschildrenspeople.org/why-the-pediatric-surgery-fellowship-for-physician-assistants-at-texas-childrens-was-the-perfect-choice/ Also, feel free to follow us on twitter @TCHPAfellows Most Sincerely, Kelly
  12. laurentsullivan

    PA Job Opening in Houston

    We are looking for a candidate that can add to a growing practice in an established office. The office is structured as a cash model practice and does not take insurance. We see patients for wellness and primary care issues. We treat the patients through bloodwork and a combination of medication/supplements. This is a great opportunity for a provider with a few years of experience that would like to have a patient base of people who care for their health and therefore are compliant in their plan of care. We also utilize a direct primary care model where the patients do not have to worry about insurance coverages. For Primary Care and Wellness services, we focus on utilizing a functional medicine approach. An ideal candidate would be someone who is willing to learn and be trained in this field of medicine. For the short term – until the provider has a full load of patients, there will be time that is required in the OR assisting the supervising physician in surgery. More will be discussed during the interview. The Physician Assistant, under the supervision of collaborating Physician, assumes multiple clinical functions involved with the care of patients, which fall under his/her scope of licensure and training. The Physician Assistant will perform detailed histories and physical exams, review patients medical records, order laboratories studies, radiological and diagnostic studies appropriate to patient's complaint, age, sex, race and physical condition. Ordering and implementation of diagnosis and development of treatment plan, prescribing medications and patient follow-ups. The Physician Assistant will need to be proficient in use of a cloud based EMR system. We look forward to speaking with you about a possible fit with our office. We are located in Southeast Houston with work hours between 8am -5pm but could be a little bit before and/or after depending on the caseload for that day. We have a great staff who is committed to the success of the provider and practice. Please send a cover letter and resume in PDF format. bijoy@restorativehwc.com
  13. Moonmanzopa

    Part-time Surgical Job in Southern NH

    I am an experienced surgical PA and relocating to the southern NH area this summer. I have been looking for a Part-time (24hr/wk) surgical job. All the current job postings are full-time; Is anyone interested in job-sharing? or does anyone know of any part-time or per diem opportunities in this area? Has anyone successful set up a job share?
  14. Exciting News! The American Association of Surgical PAs will be hosting a Pre-PA Information and mentoring session in ORLANDO FLORIDA JANUARY 20th, 2017. It will be held at the Doubletree MCO hotel. There will be a 2 and a half hour coaching session and plenty of time after for practice interviews and essay reviews. Plus, a certificate of attendance will be a great way to dress up your CASPA application! Getting into PA school has become very competitive, and many school now have more than 20-25 applicants for each open seat. Student will be able to meet PA leaders and admission committee members and learn first hand tips and tricks to become a successful PA Program applicant. Some of the topics to be covered include: -Learn about the amazing & rapidly growing PA career field. -Overview of the PA Profession -How to get a shadow -PA Profession news that all applicants need to know -Essentials of Academic prerequisites -Health care/patient care prerequisites -How to deal with CASPA -PA-wanna-be essays -How to stand out as an applicant Attending this seminar attendees receive: Unique certificate of attendance suitable for listing on PA applications Copies of all PowerPoint slides and lecture materials One on one opportunities to speak with PAs serving on admission committees Unique tips, tricks, and advice you can't get from a book or a website. The event is hosted by AASPA and given by Surgical PAs, PA school faculty members, and admissions experts Register at AASPA.COM ($65) For any questions, please contact ceo@aaspa.com.
  15. Just wondering if anyone knows of any plastic surgery residencies? I know there are numerous general surgery ones, and maybe plastics get covered in one of those? I also found some things regarding plastic surgery residency but they seemed like they were from a few years ago. Thanks for any help!
  16. I was recently offered a vascular surgery position at a large hospital. I will be primarily managing patients on the floor, not in the OR very often at all except during my training. I am really looking forward to this job and think I will have the opportunity to learn alot! Does anyone have any general tips for the job or for studying? Any textbooks/study guides that you recommend for vascular conditions? Any advice would be much appreciated!
  17. So this is essentially my first rodeo when it comes to negotiating a contract offer. Reading up on it now and came across this statement. Source: http://cheekyscientist.com/12-tips-on-how-to-negotiate-a-job-offer-to-increase-your-starting-salary/ Based on your experience, is this a good way to go about things. I'm trying to negotiate this contract (http://www.physicianassistantforum.com/index.php?/topic/41261-family-med-offer-need-advice/), and i don't know if i should ask for everything at once or separately, like the author of the article suggests. Any input would be appreciated. Thanks!
  18. I am in month four of didactic year, and I wonder if I am unknowingly part of a weird social science experiment. I have witnessed the worst behavior from my "colleagues" that I have ever seen in a professional setting. We actually have a group of bullies in our class that have taken it upon themselves to cyber text (bully) other students during lecture. They interrupt and insult lecturers. They have a point system game that grades people's questions on level of stupidity. They got together and assessed who was worthy to be in the class the first week of school and have since then hated on the people that they didn't feel deserved to be there. Physical safety has been jeopardized; a few students have felt physically unsafe. They even have a little following of female participants who dislike the victims because they were asked to come forward and identify the predators. OK... you get it. This is weird..... My question to you..... Is this normal? I mean, I truly thought caring people were drawn to healthcare, not elitist, prejudice and racist (yes I said racist) jerks. I guess I assumed that we would all work together and help each other through some very challenging times - but alas I think I was wrong. Is this normal? Is this stress? WTH is going on? Our university is doing a great job handling the nonsense (one person was kicked out today) so don't worry about that. but is this common?
  19. So I have graduation coming up soon, and have recently been offered a job in general surgery. I'm in a state that does not have the best median salary for PA's. The offer is 80k for first 6 months, then 85k for next 6 months, then 90k after 1 year. After 6 months I can begin to collect a bonus of 1% of my supervising physician's net collections which is paid out quarterly. I should also add that they've agreed to pay me a monthly stipend of $1,000/month until graduation, which would total $5,000. They are offering full benefits, $1500 + 1 week off for CMEs, & 10 vacation days (will go up to 15 days after 1 year). It's a very busy job with long hours but I love the physician and love surgery. I learn so much every day. I guess I am just looking for reassurance that this is a respectable offer. I was honestly expecting to start out higher than 80k, but since there is a guaranteed salary raise plus the bonus it seems like a good compromise. Any thoughts?
  20. I am a pre-PA and am interested to learn about compensation packages from those of you who are employed by university health systems, particularly the University of California and particularly those who practice in a surgical subspecialty. A basic search through several UC medical center websites gives me an idea as to what a first year graduate would earn hourly at each of these sites, but no additional information about CME, licensing, or whether quarterly reconciliation bonuses are part of the pay scheme. When I shadowed in the CVICU of one UC medical center, the PAs there were reportedly working 80-100 hours per week. Whether or not that number is inflated is beside the point; however, I would be interested to learn about those weekly hours beyond 40 (and those spent on call) are compensated. Just to be clear to those lifers on the Forum, I have no interest in working those kinds of hours. I am not focused on trying to make the most money I can right out of the gate and kill myself in the process. Just trying to learn from those of you who have experience working in university hospital systems. Interested to know what the advantages are in terms of compensation, life-work balance and what the most obvious pitfalls are. In sum, is it more trouble than what it is worth it to work for a university health system? Note about me: I currently work for a non-profit charity that provides plastic and reconstructive surgical services to victims of natural and man-made disasters. Working in an administrative capacity for this organization is what has energized me to seek clinical training as a PA. Its nice that PA compensation can be lucrative, but my chief focus in switching careers is to make a difference in the lives of my patients, whether domestic or international.
  21. Annual wellness exam. Getting old so occasional ectopic beat (isolated about every 6-8 weeks apart I'd guess) noted on pulse check w/o run of tachyarrhythmia over past couple of months. FH of AF with parents and younger brother. EKG done (this provider even does them if asx. for the $$$ only I suspect). Nurse comes in to tell me that it's ok and that we're done. "Uh, I don't think it was normal. There's a new LAD and LAHB but at least I know it's there now." Saw EKG on computer display and not on paper. For those who are new to the profession a quick EKG tip. If lead I is positive, lead AVF is negative, and lead II is negative then you've got yourself a LAD and a LAHB. Getting back to the visit, "I would like a Ca+ Index score to see how much Ca+ buildup you have at this point." My thought bubble says, "And the benefit of this is what to me? Pt. asx. aside from unsustained new onset ectopy. What are you going to recommend next; a cath for an asx. pt.? I don't think so." Time for a new PCP me thinks. Someone please feel free to correct me if wrong but one of my old cardiologists passed this along in addition to both I and AVF being negative representing a RAD w/o having to do all the interpolation.
  22. I am looking for some shadowing opportunities. I am in the midst of applying to PA Schools and would love to experience the various fields. I have used PAshadowonline.com with no success, given that only one PA is currently listed but not available. Are there additional resources/Professionals willing to take on a Pre-PA student? If there is anyone willing to be a mentor of sorts, I would enjoy hearing from you. I love working with people, I am extremely responsible and have lots of medical and volunteer experience. Thank you for your time.
  23. NYCPAC

    Reconstructive Surgery

    Hi! I am a relatively new grad and have only been at my current Internal Med job for about 2 months and I am BORED senseless. I took the job as almost a stepping stone as I was a little unsure about what specialty I wanted to go into and figured IM was broad enough to let me choose after a year or so of experience. Its a rather prestigious hospital in NYC which may look good on a resume but on the inside the job is kind of a disaster. I am not provided with much training at all, my boss has terrible communication skills, and overall I am really really bored with internal medicine. I don't feel like I'm making all that much of a difference to these chronically ill people who just straight up don't take care of themselves and are very noncompliant. That aside, I think I have decided that my calling is really reconstructive surgery. I have an impeccable eye for detail and always try to make things look and feel ideal for people. However, I am finding it difficult to find such positions on job boards, forums, and groups. Many of the plastics jobs I have found are all for PAs to use lasers and botox. Any ideas where there are listings for positions for legitimate recon surgery? Also, when is "too soon" to leave this position? I feel like by not having my hands in the OR right now I would continue to be a less desirable candidate for future positions if I stay longer than a year here. In terms of professionalism I of course would give 2 wks notice, but I'm not sure if being this unhappy for an entire year is worth the wait to make myself happy in my career. Any advice would be helpful at this point!
  24. MattasaurusRex

    NEED HELP finding a suitable specialty

    Hey all, I'm pre-PA at UW-Madison, and am one of those people how gets so much peace of mind knowing exactly what I want to do in the future. I've been trying to find the perfect specialty for myself according to some criteria and I'm wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction as to which specialty would suit me best: -interesting field, with lots of variety, and intellectually challenging -good hours (maybe 8-5, somewhere around that general area, not a crazy amount of call, etc.) -very good salary+benefits -hands on but also requires just as much thinking and decision making (using pharmacology, physiology, etc.) -most importantly would allow me to be able to love what I do, as well as to be the best possible father/husband I hope to be. I've looked a lot into CT/CV, and general surgery, ER medicine, and ortho, and all of those interest me a lot, it just seems like they wouldn't be so "family-friendly" as a career. Thoughts? Any advice is MUCH appreciated, thanks so much
  25. I'm slightly more than half way though my Residency/Fellowship program. I'm beginning to look for jobs and am hoping to work in Pediatric Neurosurgery. I am aware of the AAPA Salary Report and do plan to use this when job hunting. Currently, I'm looking for positions in the pacific NW (incl CA), CO, UT, midwest and eastcoast down to NC. I was wondering if anyone had any experience or opinion on salary negotiation and what your residency is 'worth' when job hunting. I know it's very dependent on location, but I'm hoping to be in the 90s for my next position. Any advice or personal experience would be great!
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