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Found 41 results

  1. Has anyone used this book/CD for studying? I really like their setup and everything, but I find that I am struggling HARD on the questions they have on the CD. I usually do pretty decent on questions banks, like LANGE, Kaplan, etc. but these I am having such a hard time! Anyone else?
  2. https://www.doximity.com/doc_news/v2/entries/11542042 I dunno if the link will work. According to the article we are ranked the #25 job now. Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G891A using Tapatalk
  3. Selling access to Rosh Review! 1 year left (expires oct 2018) $110.
  4. Like new CME4LIFE PANCE/PANRE review course DVD set. All 16 DVD's are in perfect working order. Also included PANCE/PANRE prep pearls review book. No markings in the book and book is also in like new condition. This is over $500 value and a GREAT review for boards! This course is also approved for 25 hours Category 1 CME. TOPICS COVERED IN THIS DVD SET ARE AS FOLLOWS AND FOLLOWS NCCPA BLUEPRINT. Pharmacology Gastrointestinal/Nutritional Hematologic Neurology Cardiology Pulmonary EENT(Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat) Endocrine Genitourinary / Reproductive Infectious Diseases Dermatologic Musculoskeletal Psychiatry/Behavioral Radiology EKG Interpretation Bugs and Drugs I do not take credit for any of the material recorded or made in this DVD set from CME4LIFE. I am just selling my copy since I have taken and passed my boards with the help from this series. I am asking $400 for everything which is over $500 value. I used this course and DOMINATED the PANRE so it is a great study tool. Let me know if interested. I also have over 9 month subscription of KAPLAN q bank which I am selling for $100.
  5. HI, I have a copy of the Fast and ECG book to sell. This book is incredibly helpful in learning ECGs for PA school and for PANCE review. DVD included, book in excellent condition.
  6. I have PANCE / PANRE review material - books, DVDs, study guides etc. Recently tested and exceeded my score goals with these resources! . Message me if you are looking for material. Thank you!
  7. EMS calls ahead, and gives report "66-year-old female patient, unresponsive, multiple epis given, amio drip, bicarb, CPR, intubated … asystole, 15 minutes down time, will arrive in 10 minutes," is what I overhear over the radio while I am working in catching up with my charts. EMS arrived with the unresponsive patient, everyone in the ER rapidly working together trying to save her. The doctor frantically giving orders, asking EMS for more information. As per EMS, the patient was in dialysis when she suddenly collapsed. Sadly, after an hour of attempting resuscitation, it was time to call it, time of death 1:11 pm. It is difficult to watch someone die in front of you; no class can prepare you for it. But it is even more difficult when the family arrives, you have a front row seat to their cries, screams, shock, and disbelief. It was not my first time seeing someone die, but this death stayed with me more than the others because my grandma passed away the same way while getting dialysis. As you stand there, in the middle of it all, you wonder-- is there anything I could have done to prevent this? I found my answer in the PA profession. I believe that most medical problems can be prevented with the right care and knowledge, or medical conditions can be stopped from progressing. I want to become a PA to keep people and their families from experiencing the pain my family and I went through with my grandma. As a scribe, I have worked closely with PAs in the emergency department. Every day, I am amazed by their skills and knowledge. With every shift, I learn something new such about a new technique, diagnosis, or treatment. Working alongside PA's has taught me the significance in positive findings during a physical exam and their indications, analyzing blood work and imaging, and collaborating with the attending physicians, radiologists, and specialist to achieve the ultimate goal of treating the patient successfully. Learning about the medical field and how to provide optimal patient care has been exciting. Scribing has given me a VIP seat to what being a PA entails, but it leaves me with the desire of wanting to do more. The PAs I work with are never intimidated by how complicated a patient might present due their preparation before encountering them. They exude confidence because of their ability to ask questions with a supervising physician. One of the main reasons the PA profession is so appealing is because of the comfort in asking for guidance from an SP and the flexibility it offers in specializing due to my multiple interests in subjects. From my experiences, I love working in both the clinical setting and the ER. By becoming a PA, I would have the opportunity to practice in either setting. As a future PA, it is my goal to provide the best patient care I can by being prepared to take on difficult medical cases and work as a team to deliver optimal patient care. As a scribe working in the clinic, I have seen the high demand and need for PAs in South Texas, especially in the Rio Grande Valley. The Valley is a highly medically underserved area. The doctor I work with has over 1,000 patients assigned to her. If it were not because of the PAs, she would not be able to see all of them and provide the healthcare they deserve. They say clinic care is not exciting, but the PA's in the clinic have caught a couple of MI's or patients with sepsis, so that is a very inaccurate assumption. Those patient's lives were saved because of the PA's. I have seen first-hand the positive impact PA's have in clinic and ER. I have heard the patients "thank you's;" I have seen their faces of worry transform into faces of relief, their pain disappear. I want to be a part of that. The Valley is known to be made up mostly Spanish speaking residents, but a majority of the providers are only English speaking, or their Spanish is very limited. I know that being bilingual will help me in closing this language barrier. I love South Texas and know that I can positively impact the community when it comes to their medical needs because I know their language and the culture. My goal is to enroll into a PA program that will prepare me with the adequate skills and knowledge that are necessary to provide the best medical attention to the people of The Valley. I know that the PA journey will be challenging and difficult, but I am prepared for it. I spent 12 years of my life crossing the border every day for school and waking up at 5 in the morning to have the opportunity at a better future, I know challenging. The journey to get here has not been easy, I have overcome language barriers, I knew no English on my first day of school in the US, now I am fluent in it. Not only did my parents sacrifice allow me to graduate from a US high school, it also gave me the opportunity to attend a US university with a full ride scholarship. Everything I have done up to this point, I have done in order to succeed in this career. I know this career requires excellence, and I am prepared to give it all that I have in order to succeed as a physician assistant. I will continue to work hard until this goal is achieved.
  8. How is it that sometimes we find our purpose in tragedy. I lost my grandma to diabetes. Diabetes did not take mercy on her. It took her slowly, until there was nothing else to take. It started with her kidneys, they slowly stopped functioning, so she had to be placed on dialysis. Lucky for her, my aunts cared enough to be trained on the process, and she was able to have it done in her home, that's if you consider that lucky. The next thing diabetes took was her sight. It continued taking from her until there was nothing more to take. As if losing your sight was not enough, it took the sensation off of her feet, then it decided to take her toes and eventually her feet. What happens to a person that needs to be dialyzed every other day, can no longer see or walk? They slowly lose their will to live, until one day, that will is completely gone. It is an extremely difficult thing to watch someone you love, suffer on a daily basis. At the end of their journey, you find comfort in knowing that they are no longer suffering, but you also wonder, is there anything I could have done to prevent this? To my previous question, the PA profession was my answer. I believe that most medical problems can be prevented with the right care and knowledge, and if they cannot be prevented, they can be stopped from progressing. I want to become a PA because I want to keep people and their families from experiencing the pain my family and I went through with my grandma. I know it is not possible to save everyone, but I want the opportunity to at least try. I have always known I wanted to be a part of the medical field. Every time someone asks me, why do you want to be a physician assistant, my response is always because I cannot imagine being anything else. I placed myself in a job that would allow me to experience the duties of a physician assistant. I have seeing the ins and outs. I have been a part of it, not as a PA, but as scribe that works very closely with them in the clinic or in the emergency department. Every day, I am amazed by their skills and knowledge. I learn something new, a new approach, a new technique, a new diagnosis, a new treatment with every shift, and I just want to keep on learning. I have learned how to differentiate a Bell's Palsy from a TIA or a stroke. I have learned the importance of the NIH stroke scale and the importance of properly assessing the score. I can tell you that a sudden sharp pain to your back and a positive CVA most likely means a kidney stone or pyelonephritis due to a urinary tract infection. A pain to your RLQ with a high white blood cell count and a positive McBurney's point could definitely be a sign for acute appendicitis or how an elevated amylase/lipase level accompanied by nausea and vomiting probably means pancreatitis, especially if that pain occurs after eating greasy/spicy foods. I have loved every single minute of working as a scribe. I cannot wait to start this career and apply everything I have and will learn. Physician assistants are not afraid or intimidated by how complicated a patient might be because of how prepared they are. They have this confidence because if they have a question about how to proceed with a patient, they have the benefit of consulting with the attending physician. There are limitations to how much we know, which is why this is one of the great benefits of the physician assistant career. My main goal as a provider would be to offer the best care to a patient, and knowing that I have the opportunity to ask for help or guidance from the supervising attending would allow me to do that. I also like the flexibility of the PA career. As a PA, you have the opportunity to work in different specialties, for me that is essential because I have multiple interests. I love working in the clinic setting as well as the ER, and by becoming a PA, I would have the opportunity to work in both. As a scribe working in the clinic, I have seen the high demand and need for PA's in South Texas, especially in the Rio Grande Valley. The Valley is a highly underserved area, especially when it comes to healthcare. The doctor I work with, has over 1,000 patients assigned to her. If it were not because of the PA's, she would not be able to provide the care they deserve. They make a huge difference. The gratitude they receive from the patients is unlike any other. I love South Texas and know that I can positively impact the community when it comes to their medical needs My goal is to enroll into a PA program that will prepare me with the adequate skills and knowledge that are necessary to provide the best medical attention the people from The Valley deserve. I know that the PA journey will be challenging and difficult, I am counting on it. I know this career requires excellence, and I am prepared to give it all that I have in order to succeed as a physician assistant. I understand my grades my first three semesters are not the best. It was not easy adapting to college after being in the same school for 12 years. Those grades do not reflex who I am as a student, once I adapted and found a new study method that works for me, my GPA improved. . I will continue to work until this goal has been achieved
  9. How is it that sometimes we find our purpose in tragedy. I lost my grandma to diabetes. Diabetes did not take mercy on her. It took her slowly, until there was nothing else to take. It started with her kidneys, they slowly stopped functioning, so she had to be placed on dialysis. Lucky for her, my aunts cared enough to be trained on the process, and she was able to have it done in her home, that's if you consider that lucky. The next thing diabetes took was her sight. It continued taking from her until there was nothing more to take. As if losing your sight was not enough, it took the sensation off of her feet, then it decided to take her toes and eventually her feet. What happens to a person that needs to be dialyzed every other day, can no longer see or walk? They slowly lose their will to live, until one day, that will is completely gone. It is an extremely difficult thing to watch someone you love, suffer on a daily basis. At the end of their journey, you find comfort in knowing that they are no longer suffering, but you also wonder, is there anything I could have done to prevent this? To my previous question, the PA profession was my answer. I believe that most medical problems can be prevented with the right care and knowledge, and if they cannot be prevented, they can be stopped from progressing. I want to become a PA because I want to keep people and their families from experiencing the pain my family and I went through with my grandma. I know it is not possible to save everyone, but I want the opportunity to at least try. I have always known I wanted to be a part of the medical field. Every time someone asks me, why do you want to be a physician assistant, my response is always because I cannot imagine being anything else. I placed myself in a job that would allow me to experience the duties of a physician assistant. I have seeing the ins and outs. I have been a part of it, not as a PA, but as scribe that works very closely with them in the clinic or in the emergency department. Every day, I am amazed by their skills and knowledge. I learn something new, a new approach, a new technique, a new diagnosis, a new treatment with every shift, and I just want to keep on learning. I have learned how to differentiate a Bell's Palsy from a TIA or a stroke. I have learned the importance of the NIH stroke scale and the importance of properly assessing the score. I can tell you that a sudden sharp pain to your back and a positive CVA most likely means a kidney stone or pyelonephritis due to a urinary tract infection. A pain to your RLQ with a high white blood cell count and a positive McBurney's point could definitely be a sign for acute appendicitis or how an elevated amylase/lipase level accompanied by nausea and vomiting probably means pancreatitis, especially if that pain occurs after eating greasy/spicy foods. I have loved every single minute of working as a scribe. I cannot wait to start this career and apply everything I have and will learn. Physician assistants are not afraid or intimidated by how complicated a patient might be because of how prepared they are. They have this confidence because if they have a question about how to proceed with a patient, they have the benefit of consulting with the attending physician. There are limitations to how much we know, which is why this is one of the great benefits of the physician assistant career. My main goal as a provider would be to offer the best care to a patient, and knowing that I have the opportunity to ask for help or guidance from the supervising attending would allow me to do that. I also like the flexibility of the PA career. As a PA, you have the opportunity to work in different specialties, for me that is essential because I have multiple interests. I love working in the clinic setting as well as the ER, and by becoming a PA, I would have the opportunity to work in both. As a scribe working in the clinic, I have seen the high demand and need for PA's in South Texas, especially in the Rio Grande Valley. The Valley is a highly underserved area, especially when it comes to healthcare. The doctor I work with, has over 1,000 patients assigned to her. If it were not because of the PA's, she would not be able to provide the care they deserve. They make a huge difference. The gratitude they receive from the patients is unlike any other. I love South Texas and know that I can positively impact the community when it comes to their medical needs My goal is to enroll into a PA program that will prepare me with the adequate skills and knowledge that are necessary to provide the best medical attention the people from The Valley deserve. I know that the PA journey will be challenging and difficult, I am counting on it. I know this career requires excellence, and I am prepared to give it all that I have in order to succeed as a physician assistant. I understand my grades my first three semesters are not the best. It was not easy adapting to college after being in the same school for 12 years. Those grades do not reflex who I am as a student, once I adapted and found a new study method that works for me, my GPA improved. . I will continue to work until this goal has been achieved
  10. I work full time M-F in orthopedic surgery. However, there are no weekends/nights/holidays/call. What kind of side jobs do you guys have? I know per diem in urgent care is a good option, but I've only ever done ortho since graduating 1.5 years ago and I think it would be hard finding a place to train for occasional work. Any options for working from home? Thanks in advance.
  11. Dear PA Student or PA Grad, Since 2012, I have helped 59 students pass the PANCE and PANRE with Online tutoring. My students were from schools all across the United States... *Of the 7 first time takers, 100% passed. *Of those who had failed once, 97% passed. *Of those who failed twice, 95% passed. *And of those who failed three times, 91% passed after taking my course. These are awesome results. Now I am pleased to offer my complete personal Automated AudioVisual PANCE/PANRE tutoring course online. This course has taken me over 5 years to develop. It is a complete NCCPA Blueprint oriented AudioVisual PANCE, PANRE tutoring course with dynamic 1,200 Audiovisual pages. This course is a tutoring review of the NCCPA Blueprint. This is my complete Reasonably Priced ‘one on one’ tutoring course now online with text and audio. Our AV Tutoring course lasts for over 20 hours. I invite you to just visit my website at www.PrecipioLearning.com to watch a free AV sample, listen to our advisory and educational blogs, lists of helpful websites such as http://www.skillstat.com/tools/ecg-simulator also to make any statements or ask any questions you desire. I Worked with AND DEPENDED on you Physician Assistants in my medical practice and in the ER over many years and found you all to be dependable and just terrific. It is my profound and public sincere opinion that your commitment, resolve, integrity and intellect are the bright Future of Medical care here in the U.S. (and in other countries as well). Most Sincerely, John Athas, M.D. (retired) Level 1 Trauma ER M.D. Internist and Instructor in Medicine Miami, Fort Lauderdale, Fl
  12. Selling my CME4Life 16-DVD review series. Topics are separated by disc and include the following: 1. Pharmacology 2. Pulmonary 3. GI/Nutritional 4. Neurology 5. Cardiology 6. EKG Interpretation 7. EENT(Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat) 8. Endocrine 9. Reproductive 10. Infectious Disease 11. Dermatologic 12. Musculoskeletal 13. Psych 14. Radiology 15. Hematologic 16. Bugs and Drugs This series was definitely helpful for studying when you just didn't feel like reading anymore or needed better ways to remember certain topics. Was able to pass my boards by using these, along with PANCE Prep Pearls and the Kaplan Q Bank. Note: One of the DVD boxes has a cracked off corner. The box will still close completely and stay shut. The DVDs are not damaged/ scratched. I only watched each DVD a handful of times, so they are basically brand new. Retail is $499. Selling my DVDs for $400. PayPal only. Message me if interested.
  13. Hi, Just wondering if anyone knows anything about Chapman University's PA program (other than what is posted on their website)? Thought I could start a thread because I haven't seen any so far. It looks like the program will be matriculating their first class in January 2015. Some interesting features to point out are that they don't seem to have any required HCE hours, but require 50 hours of documented PA shadowing. They also require a Medical Ethics class as a prereq which I feel is unusual. Since they also have a bridge program that accepts undergrads directly from Chapman, I can't help but wonder if the program is aimed at younger students fresh out of undergrad (kind of like myself...) as well as Chapman students specifically. I'm not from the area, so I wonder how the clinical sites will be...? Now that Marshall B. Ketchum is also getting going, there may be competition between the two schools for preceptors in the orange county area...??? Anyone know about their reputations? Any information out there would be greatly appreciated! I'm pretty hesitant about applying to any new, provisionally accredited programs and if someone could tell me whether or not my worries are well-founded, that would be great. Thinking if I should even apply.
  14. Hi Everyone! I'm a few months away from my PANCE and have heard great (and not so great) things about both Hippo and CME4Life. I would love any feedback from anybody who has experience (or a coupon code ;) ) with either.
  15. Hi everyone, I'm interested in getting access to the Kaplan Qbank until the end of September and wondered if anyone wants to sell their access codes. I'm currently using Lange, Davis's, and Exam Master, and have played around with the Rosh Review questions but have heard Kaplan questions are a good challenge. Please PM me if you're willing to sell. I'd also be interested in getting access to Rosh Review for a good price. Thanks! Amanda
  16. I know I've read plenty on here about contracts and what to look for and what needs to be negotiated for - so useful! But I haven't seen this question come up...... I am 100% for having a lawyer go through my contract and find anything bad after I review it. How did you find your lawyer that specifically deals with this thing? What do I need to look for - a specific type of office or title or anything? Certain credentials? I haven't gotten a written offer yet - but I want to be prepared for that important step before signing! ;) Thanks!
  17. Hi, I graduated several months ago and have been doing a very detailed review of everything in the blueprint. Now, it's crunch time. I am signed up for a board review in early May and set to take my PANCE in late May. Any suggestions on which book or question banks I should focus on for these last few weeks? If you had to pick one thing to study from for the three weeks before your PANCE what would you choose? Thanks!
  18. Selling Cme4Life - "The Complete PANRE / PANCE Review Course - 16 DVD Set" DVDs include: 1. Pharmacology, 2. Pulmonary, 3. GI/Nutritional, 4. Neurology, 5. Cardiology, 6. EKG Interpretation, 7. EENT(Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat), 8. Endocrine, 9. Reproductive, 10. Inf. Dis., 11. Dermatologic, 12. Musculoskeletal, 13. Psych, 14. Radiology, 15. Hematologic, 16. Bugs and Drugs Purchased 3 months ago for $630. I just took the PANRE and passed. Did very well on the primary care version - especially notable given I only do ortho surgery. Will sell for $250 for quick sale. Will send you everything, including the workbook: "A Comprehensive Review For the Certification and Recertification Examinations for Physician Assistants." Paypal acceptable
  19. Selling cme4life - Complete PANRE / PANCE Review Course - 16 DVD Set DVDs topics include: 1. Pharmacology, 2. Pulmonary, 3. GI/Nutritional, 4. Neurology, 5. Cardiology, 6. EKG Interpretation, 7. EENT(Eyes, Ears, Nose and Throat), 8. Endocrine, 9. Reproductive, 10. Inf. Dis., 11. Dermatologic, 12. Musculoskeletal, 13. Psych, 14. Radiology, 15. Hematologic, 16. Bugs and Drugs Purchased 3 months ago for $630 new. I just took the PANRE and passed. Did very well on the primary care version, notable given I only do ortho surgery. Will sell for $250. Will send you everything, including the workbook: "A Comprehensive Review For the Certification and Recertification Examinations for Physician Assistants." Paypal acceptable
  20. PAFT Creates Task Force on Autonomy PAs for Tomorrow (PAFT), a national advocacy organization focused on the future of the PA profession, announces that their Board of Directors has unanimously voted to develop a national task force focused on PA practice autonomy. Nichole Bateman, PAFT President, says “The task force is intended to create a representative body of PAs and other professionals to coordinate information and strategize efforts among those who see autonomous practice as an evolving reality for the PA profession. The time to explore how autonomy can and should apply to PA practice is now.” Brian Sady, MMSc, MPAS, PA-C, author of the white paper “Optional Autonomy for Experienced PAs in Primary Care in Nevada” approached the PAFT board of directors with the task force concept. He found that there are extensive autonomy efforts by other PAs across the nation. According to Mr. Sady, “In seeking information and research, I encountered a great many of my PA peers who are doing similar research and have similar ideas, but have no way to coordinate those efforts and develop the concept. I found that when I discussed the idea of optional autonomy using specific verbiage that would allow experienced PAs in primary care to be fully autonomous OR keep a collaborative agreement, PAs were very enthusiastic.” The working definition of autonomy for the purposes of task force development includes incorporating the concept of OPTIONAL autonomy for experienced PAs in primary care, i.e. no supervisory or collaborative language in state statutes for PAs with solid clinical experience. The autonomy concept is not new to organized medicine but has not historically been applied to PAs. The intent of PA autonomy is not to sever or separate the historic PA/Physician relationship. The intent is to better reflect how PAs deliver care in the healthcare environment of today – which is, in many settings, already very autonomous with little physician oversight in the real life delivery of high quality, safe care. PA practice of medicine has evolved and advanced significantly since the creation of the profession nearly 50 years ago. Despite diligent efforts by PAs across the nation, supervision language and concepts that govern PA practice in many states have not kept pace. In many states, antiquated supervision language is no longer reflective of how PAs deliver care in modern healthcare systems and has become a hindrance for PA practice. Federal laws, state statutes and individual institutional policies should reflect what PAs actually do in the delivery of healthcare. Most importantly, those laws and policies should be responsive and reactive to increase rather than restrict access to medical services for patients. PA education is standardized to produce well-trained professionals who practice medicine. The modern PA is a proven “value added” member of the healthcare team. Removing restrictive supervision language will increase access to quality care and lower costs. Though the creation of the task force will be initially under the helm of the PAFT organization, the greater vision includes involvement of key individuals, organizations and representative bodies. Invitation to leadership in the AAPA, AFPPA, military branch and VA PAs, state constituent organizations, PA Student Academy as well as individual pro-autonomy PAs will only strengthen the development and directional design of the task force.
  21. Hi everyone! I'm looking for someone who provides private tutoring for the PANCE. Not really looking for a review course company, though recommendations are always welcome. I live in NYC and would really appreciate you letting me know if you know of a good tutor for this specific exam. Also open to review/study groups in the area. Thanks so much!! Nicole
  22. Hey everyone! Katie from Alabama here. I am an RT (2 years experience) trying to get into PA school. I am struggling with this personal statement. I somehow ended up writing TWO... they are completely different (in my eyes) I would love any input you guys have as to which one the admissions committee may value more! I'm not exactly looking for help editing them (though I would gladly accept because I definitely need it) I am just trying to decide which one is worth me continuing to work on...Thank you so much!! -Katie PS # 1: My interest in medicine began at a young age. I was first introduced to the health care field as I regularly made visits to the emergency room being a carefree child. As the years passed and I grew older, I began to consider different roles within this field. I decided I wanted to be a nurse so I could care directly for patients. I had every intention of being the best nurse any patient could have. I knew it was perfect for me because I enjoyed communicating with people and I felt like I could make patients feel more at ease even though they were going through a medical crisis. I had the opportunity to shadow a family practice nurse at a local doctor's office and realized that the nursing profession wasn't for me. I didn't give up here, searching for other modalities in health care, I shadowed a dermatologist and her team. During my time shadowing, I was introduced to the profession of Physician Assistant. I was very much impressed that a PA can see their own patients, treat and diagnose them, and still rely on the physician’s knowledge when needed. This experience with aPhysician Assistant solidified all my desires of working in medicine. I knew that choosing this as my profession would allow me to interact with patients closely and be a vital asset to the medical field. My passion for learning more about the human body intensified when I took an elective course at my junior college. The course wasHuman Gross Anatomy and Pathology which consisted of mostly cadaver dissection. What seems gruesome to most people was completely fascinating to me. I eagerly attended class every day because I thoroughly enjoyed studying human anatomy. I loved being able to physically touch the muscles, bones, and organs of the cadaver. Although anatomy books provide pretty realistic illustrations of anatomical features, the experience of direct examination of cadavers enhanced my interest in learning. The fifteen weeks I spent dissecting my cadaver was only the beginning to a lifetime passion I have for learning more about medicine and the human body. Naturally, I began pursuing an undergraduate degree that would allow me to be as involved in patient care as possible. I continued my education at the University as a Respiratory Therapy major. The program coursework gave me valuable knowledge about the respiratory and cardiovascular systems, while the clinical requirements allowed me to gain hands on experience dealing with a variety of patient ailments. Transitioning from a student to a young professional, I began my career as a Registered Respiratory Therapist (RRT) at the state’s only pediatric specialty hospital. Here, I work in a level IV NICU caring for a wide range of patients including extreme prematurity to infants requiring surgery. I manage artificial airways, conventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilators, nitric oxide administration, and blood gas interpretation. Working in an intensive care unit matured my ambition to become a physician assistant. I often assist doctors and with intubations, codes, and bedside surgeries which only makes me aspire to do more in the realm of health care. The valuable experience I have gained as an RRT will undoubtably aid in my journey to becoming a PA. I am choosing a career as a physician assistant because I am passionate about medicine. I am eager to learn more about the human body and excited to share my knowledge with future patients. Deciding at a young age to work in health care has granted me with the ability to stay focused on this career goal throughout life. My work as an RRT has allowed me to stay dedicated to patient care and gain valuable experience along the way. With the knowledge gained from the physician assistant program, I know that I will be able to provide the best quality care for my patients. PS #2: She was the first patient that I truly loved. Big brown eyes, beautiful curly brown hair, and a smile that would melt your heart. She was everybody’s favorite, her name was Baby A. Her mother referred to their time in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit as a roller coaster ride, the only thing for certain was the uncertainty that each day would bring. I had only been working as a respiratory therapist in the NICU a few weeks before I met Baby A and her mother. I took a liking to them from the moment we met. The mom was young and was going through some family issues, so I instantly became someone she felt comfortable talking to. I spent a lot time in Baby A’s room, monitoring her ventilator and respiratory treatments, as well as keeping up my relationship with mom. Each passing day, her condition would change, some days were improvements and some days were setbacks. For seven and a half months Baby A would fight for her life, being an inspiration to everyone who met her. Months later, I remember her mom tapping me on the shoulder as I was charting. Tears in her eyes, she was about to have to make the hardest decision any parent has to make. Baby A was not improving and hadn’t over the past few weeks. Doctor’s gave her mother the new prognosis and she chose what was best for her daughter. I stood there with her and hugged her and cried with her. No words to say, just showed the love and compassion I had for her. Was this okay? Was this allowed? The questions popped in my head as I held the mother in my arms. The only thing I knew for certain was that it felt like the right thing to do. The right thing to do at this moment was to show a human response for a very real human emotion. And that was okay. I have learned through this experience that health care isn’t always about saving the day or healing the sick, but rather being there to comfort the patient and their families. I am choosing to become a physician assistant because I want to combine my passion for helping people and my love for medicine. I know that I obtain all the characteristics needed to pursue a career as a PA, and with the knowledge gained from this program, I will be able to provide the best quality care to my patients. In memory of Baby A and other patients who have touched my life, I want benevolence to be a distinct characteristic in my approach to health care. I want to heal others with my knowledge as well as with the empathy I show them. Thank you again.
  23. If anyone needs a review for their personal statement send me a message.
  24. I have the newest edition Emory PANCE review course for sale. This is a great in depth review course for DVD and PDA formats. I just passed and did well thanks to this DVD. Asking 120$ OBO. PM me if interested or have questions. Thanks!
  25. Just passed the PANCE, and now looking to sell the Emory DVD and PDA review. It's the 2013-2016 Edition. It's a good in-depth review course. Asking $100 obo. Please email pmarlow83@yahoo.com if you have any questions Thanks.
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