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  1. Let's post here for the 2019-2020 CASPA cycle for Drexel University to keep each other in the loop of when we applied, stats, any contact with the university, interview invites and acceptances! Good luck to everyone. Submitted CASPA app 5/14 Verified 5/14 Receipt of application from Drexel (via email) 5/14
  2. Hi all! Hope everyone is having a great week. I've been a dietitian now for almost 7 years (times FLIES!), however, I've been thinking about perusing PA ever since I was in my dietetic internship. I went even as far as shadowing the top PA at the local hospital during my dietetic internship. The PA plan kind of got pushed to the side due to life, getting full time dietitian jobs, advancing in my career and etc. The PA route has ALWAYS been on the back of my mind, and now more than ever. I am the main dietitian in the neurosurgical ICU at my hospital, and cover several ICU's. It is apparent how much medicine interests me and how I yearn to be able to do more clinically and for the patient. I work directly with PA's, MD's, nurses, therapists, etc. Does any know if this counts as direct patient care? Additionally, I review labs, provide tube feeding and diet/vitamins recommendations, create nutrition diagnoses, educate patients and families, and etc. Also, I am 30 years old, and likely have to retake some science courses, as they are now >10 years old. Need some encouragement that I am NOT too old to do this! Thanks in advanced! Ali
  3. I know this is mainly a "contact the school" issue, but I'm wondering is anyone has ever had a problem with programs accepting a combined organic chem and biochem course? I just found out one of them won't allow it after I applied
  4. I’ve recently been offered a position as a dialysis tech in an outpatient center. I shadowed the other day and the staff seamed friendly. My main duties would be weighing patients, cannulating them and setting up the machines, drawing labs, and monitoring their vitals throughout treatment. This all would be under the supervisions of an RN. I would work 8 and 10 hour shifts. I was hoping someone who has worked as a dialysis tech or knows someone who has could give me feedback about their experiences. I do already have 2 years experience volunteering as an EMT-A on a fairly busy service and plan on continuing to do so. I have also been invited to interview for a medical assistant position at an urgent care, but the interview is after the deadline to decide if I’m going to accept the dialysis position. The pros I see in working as a dialysis tech: Getting to know my patients and their cases. Experience in the chronic disease side of medicine. Cons: It’s could be repetitive work and I would really only learn about kidney disease.
  5. Hello! I was wondering if anyone accepted into this program could share or message their application stats (gpa, HCE...), I want to know whether, if I were to apply in a later cycle I could be considered a competitive applicant. Thank you for reading this and thank you for your time, I appreciate it a lot! -Maylily7 P.S. I'll put my stats here if ya want to comment on my chances of acceptance: cGPA 3.7, sGPA 3.5, Dean's List 7/8 semesters (currently in my last semester), about 100 hours volunteering for my school's EMS. I don't have a lot of Patient care hours but I am hoping to take a gap year and work on that. I also hope to retake the GRE to improve my score as well. Again, thanks so much!
  6. I have 2 Bachelors in Sciences. Bioscience & Medical Lab Scientist (Dual Degree) - Cum Laude Science Technology& Society (concentration in health and wellness) - Cum Laude My cGPA is 3.61 with a sGPA of 3.52. My PCE hours are as a PT aide at a rehabilitation center and working as a MA at a clinic for a total of 1,275. I have 200 hours shadowing a PA in internal medicine. I have 250 hours volunteering at a place of worship, where I helped prepare and served food to the congregants. I have 4 recommendation letters PA that I shadowed MD that i worked for A&P professor Molecular Biology professor I have received good feedback on my personal statement as well. I plan to submit by June 5th. PLEASE LET ME KNOW WHAT MY CHANCES ARE! I am freaking out!
  7. I am taking a gap year following my undergraduate at the University of Idaho, and applying this cycle in May of 2019. I am terrified of being denied entry, I feel that there isn't much that stands out in my application. I am doing an impressive internship this summer, but will be applying before it begins. I hope to matriculate into a surgical career, but am keeping my options open at this point. Please give me your 100% candid feedback. I'm an Idaho resident, from a medically underserved area btw. cGPA: 3.54 sGPA: 3.5 Paid PCE: ~800 hours as a surgical floor CNA Unpaid PCE: 221.25 hours ED volunteer Scribe Hours: 45 hours Free clinic PA shadowing: 80 hours (FP, Surgical Speciality) MD shadowing: 15 hours (FP, Orthopedic Surgeon) Volunteer hours: ~300 Muscular Dystrophy Association, Environmental, Greek Definitely applying to: Northern Arizona, Samuel Merritt University, Western University of Health Sciences, Idaho State University, Cornell University, PACE University (Lenox Hill) Maybe applying to: Carroll University, Salus University, Sullivan University, Albany Medical College, Touro University
  8. Hello All, This is my first post in this forum and im really pumped! I'm currently a junior right now and will hopefully be applying to PA schools here in the coming future. I was wondering if I could get some insights from the people who are ahead of me in the process with how applying goes, and if i have a shot at some higher tier schools. So far my cumulative GPA is a 3.77, with a science GPA of about 3.65ish. Courses I've taken (Sport and Exercise Science Major/Pre-PA track) are as follows: Molecular and Cellular Bio: B+ Gen Chem I and II w/ Labs: B, B+, A-, A- Bio II: A+, A Animal Physiology w/lab : A-, A- Trigonometry: A Psych Stats: A **Currently in ** Human Gross Anatomy w/ Cadaver Based lab (Hardest course at my university taught by two former MDs, one being from Yale): B+ (Hopefully) and A Organic Chemistry I and II (w/ Ochem 1 Lab): A+, A+, B+ (Do not plan on taking Ochem II lab) Nutrition: A+ Research Methods: A- Intro Psych, Psych of Human Development and Abnormal Psych: all A+'s Currently I still plan to take Biochem, Genetics and Microbiology along with some other sport and exercise science fluff courses. (Biomechanics, Clinical ex. physio, exercise physio, motor learning and development etc.) I will be planning to do research this coming spring semester with my advisor will hopefully be presenting it at the ACSM National Conference in Harrisburg, PA. Im apart of my schools Honor's Program as well as the national honors society Phi Eta Sigma. I will also planing to be joining the National Honors Society of Biology: Beta Beta Beta. Also, outside of honors programs im apart of the Delta Kappa Epslion Fraternity. (So if any brothers are reading this hello!) However, i believe my biggest flaw in my application will be my HCE. So far i really dont have any HCE hours besides a couple hours of shadowing and what not. Will this hinder me greatly in applying to PA schools? I plan on taking a CNA course in the summer and hopefully will get a job as a PT tech at a local Sport PT place here in town. I have a list of schools that i would like to apply to and then i have some of the other schools i consider top tier (Pitt, Penn State, Yale, PCOMM, Cornell etc.) Also, do you have any tips on how to study for GRE's? Or did you just go in there and wing it? How do my chances look? - Thank you, Z.
  9. Hi Everyone, I am applying to PA schools this year. Here are some statistics about me 3.0-3.1 Science GPA 3.5 Cumulative GPA About 700 Volunteer Hours 60 Shadowing hours of PA (3 different specialities) 12 Hours of Shadowing a NP 2,500 Direct Patient Care Experience as a CNA 1st generation student (first to go to college) Honors student, along with being a peer mentor. How many schools do you think I should apply to? Sadly, my science GPA is low because I received a C+ in genetics, and a D in ochem, now retaking Ochem and more than likely will receive anything in the C Range. All my other pre-req's are all A's and Maybe 1 B or 2. Attended Pre-PA conference. Have not taken the GRE yet, but severely worried. Input? If you have been participating in cycles, please include some of your stats and the outcomes. THANKS EVERYONE.
  10. Hello! I was wondering if anyone accepted into this program could share or message their application stats (gpa, HCE...), I want to know whether, if I were to apply I could be considered a competitive applicant. Thank you for reading this and thank you for your time, I appreciate it a lot! -Maylily7
  11. I need advice on how to handle a certain advisor at my school. There is a lot to this story but here is a nutshell: I'm majoring in Cell and molecular biology and this individual is the advisor for my degree. When I express my interest in PA school he shuts me down and makes me feel stupid for wanting to go that route (he discourages people from the medical feild even though this degree was designed for pre med and pre health students). I've gone to another professor to sign up for classes and when he found out he sought me out and said he is the only one who should be advising me. He told me I'm going to graduate in a year although that won't be enough time to finish my pre recs for PA school and when I say this he flat out talks over me and doesn't listen to me. This advisor has behaved inappropriately with me before and I have recognized him as a emotional manipulator. When I stand up for my self and don't do exactly what he wants me to do or I dont let him pry into my personal life he acts like a humongous baby and treats me like I'm a bad person. This creates an immense amount of stress and anxiety for me when all I want to do is just enjoy school and do well. I have to take 3 more classes with this person plus a senior project but I have dread about it because of the way he acts. My school is so small that the way its designed, he's in charge of much of my academics because of my degree. I've even though about transfering schools because this feels so unhealthy but I don't want to run from a problem just because its hard. Any advice?
  12. I'm a second time applicant and would love to get some feedback on my personal statement to submit for this round. Thanks so much for reading/reviewing! If you have a PS you'd like feedback on let me know in a comment and I'd be happy to return the favor. Part of me wants to shorten it a bit but I also feel like each paragraph is necessary to 'tell my story.' Suddenly, I’m enveloped into an embrace with an elderly woman; we maintain our stance for several minutes without parting. When we finally divide, I am held at arm’s length. The remnant of tears trace down the side of her cheeks as she speaks softly. “It will be okay, thank you.” Her words are reassuring, although I am unsure if they are truly allocated for me. We had attempted to resuscitate her husband in the emergency room for an hour without success. It wasn’t the sudden loss of life that caught me off guard, but the magnitude of the heartbreak I felt for the woman’s family that continues to resonate with me. This experience is part of what has made me realize that providing care within my community drives my passion to become a PA. After six years of climbing the corporate ladder I came to the realization that I was spending the majority of my day agonizing about a bottom line rather than truly serving our clients. My position required hours of analyzing medical records in preparation for trial. I would become engrossed during my review researching patients’ diagnosis and treatment options. I received the privileged, behind-the-curtain, opportunity to discuss their plans of care directly with physicians during depositions. This experience made me interested in medicine. During this time, I also began volunteering with Habitat for Humanity, which is where I had the experience that inspired me to change career paths altogether. It was a blistering summer day and we were in the final stages of restoring a dilapidated home. My few short months of involvement with Habitat for Humanity were beginning to feel more fulfilling than my corporate. I was wearing a blue hard hat and Habitat shirt which was stained with streaks of grey paint from the day’s work. The home owner, Valerie, waved me over for a cold glass of lemonade which I graciously accepted. As I sat down to enjoy a break from the heat, she relayed the story of how she became the recipient of Habitat’s philanthropic efforts. Valerie, a single mother with two smaller children, described her youngest son’s severe disabilities, which had left him confined to a wheelchair. She discussed the difficulty of maintaining a job while tending to her son’s full time needs. She went on to explain the many hardships the family had as a result of financing his costly medical treatment. The paint brush in my hand almost seemed to shrink in size as I realized how minuscule my contribution to the community actually was. That day, with Valerie’s story burning in my head, I returned home and enrolled in school to become an EMT. I could not have fathomed that I would pursue a career in health care, and it is due to my trials and tribulations since completing my undergraduate work that health care has become an interwoven part of my identity. During my undergraduate program, I became discouraged, pursuing unfulfilling majors in multiple career paths. I lost my way during this time and felt disheartened with my education. Since I ascertained my devotion to become a PA I have excelled in my prerequisite course work and contributed over 1,000 hours to the underserved within my community while maintaining a full-time job. While volunteering at Puget Sound Christian Clinic I began to realize the restrictions of my EMT license. I lacked the education necessary to fully care for my patients that required ongoing medical treatment. I was provided with the opportunity to collaborate with an interdisciplinary team and had my first interactions with a PA. My path to becoming a PA was illuminated after observing our PA’s calming demeanor when faced with managing patients chronic medical conditions while navigating difficult language barriers. Recognizing the limitations of my EMT license, I strive to assist my patients at a higher level of care and offer greater support to the underserved as a PA. I look forward to using what I learn in a Physician’s Assistant program to lessen the burden of health care expenses for individuals like Valerie and continue to connect to their families in my community in their times of hardship.
  13. I have written my personal statement and mentioned that I am bilingual in English and Spanish. My native language is English, but I have taken 10 years of Spanish courses and would consider myself pretty fluent (I use my Spanish daily with patients in an inpatient setting). Has anyone who has had past interviews, and is bilingual, been given an interview question in their second language? This could just be pre-application anxiety, but I see myself potentially walking into an interview already a nervous disaster and then just totally blowing it if they asked me a question in Spanish that I didn't quite understand. Thanks in advance!
  14. This week, I am continuing my series on the most common personal statement mistakes. If you didn’t catch part one, check it out here. Below, you can find five more mistakes that applicants make when writing their personal statements. Writing About Something That Makes You a “Good Applicant” - Referencing being a “strong applicant” in a personal statement is not something I am a huge fan of. Your goal throughout your academic and clinical experiences should be to build a foundation that will make a better PA student and a stronger PA. It should not be about checking off boxes just because you think that it's what adcoms want to see. Don’t list off your extracurriculars in your personal statement, including things because you feel that they make you a “more competitive” applicant. This essay is not a resume. Instead, write about experiences that you’ve had that are central to your decision to pursue this profession, not about those that you think adcoms want to hear about. Addressing Difficult Topics the Wrong Way - To include or not to include… that always seems to be the question. Whether it’s bad grades, mental health issues, struggles with addiction or other life tragedy, it’s hard to know what should be addressed in a personal statement. I find that when applicants choose to include difficult topics, they focus too much on the negative without emphasizing the positive while including lots of unnecessary details. They often don’t even mention how their experience was relevant to their journey towards the PA profession at all. The big takeaway here is if you are going to touch on a difficult topic in your personal statement, make sure that it's an integral part of your journey before dedicating characters to it. If you have decided to include it, the best thing you can do is be concise about shortcomings/difficult subject matter/etc. Don't dwell on the negative. Instead, emphasize how you addressed the issue whether it's mental health, grades, chronic illness or whatever other issue or circumstance you experienced. Did you grow from it? Did it push you towards the profession more? Did it motivate you to change something? Explore that. Forcing the Reader to Read Between the Lines - I can’t tell you how many times I highlight a sentence and make the comment, “Why?” Applicants will often say something like, “Being a paramedic/scribe/MA/EMT made me want to become a PA. It was a great experience.” But, why?! What exactly was it about this experience that drove you to pursue your goal of becoming a PA? When sharing your experiences, make sure you say exactly what you want to say. Don’t force the reader to make inferences about your feelings and insights. Using Passive, Questioning Language - This one seems minor but it can change the entire tone of your essay. Let me give you an example - “Some of my grades in my undergraduate career were not stellar, but I think that with my recent successes I am likely more prepared to take on PA school. I know it will be a challenge but I feel I could be ready.” Try to avoid using terms like, “I feel… I think… Could… Would... Probably… Likely…” when projecting your future success. Be certain of yourself in your language and your tone. Reframing this and emphasizing some stronger language - “Although I occasionally struggled early on in my undergraduate career, my more recent successes are a reflection of my true academic ability. PA school will be a challenge, but I know that I am ready and more prepared than ever to take it on.” In this iteration, you’ve said that your recent successes are reflective of your abilities, not that “they might be.” You have said that you “know” you are prepared to handle PA school as opposed to just “thinking” you could be ready. Flowery Language - Last, but definitely not least, flowery language. This one is an essay killer. “The morning was crisp and bright when I stepped out my creaky, old door. I noticed the beautiful, pink rose sprouting from the green bush, covered with dew droplets on petals that were as bold and stunning as they were fragrant.” This is drowning in unnecessary descriptors. Please, don’t do this. Adcoms don’t want to read this. You probably don’t even want to read this. It’s all filler. Tell an engaging story but avoid using flowery, overly descriptive prose that says absolutely nothing while taking up an offensive amount of characters. Be concise and intentional with your writing.
  15. Hey y’all! I just posted a new article geared towards pre-PA students. It’s part one in a two part series about the biggest mistakes I see when critiquing and editing personal statements!
  16. Hey y’all! For those of you that don’t know, I have started a personal statement editing service. I have read more than 100 statements over the last year working with PA school applicants and have really honed in on what makes a good essay. I was fortunate enough to have significant support from this community as well as r/prephysicianassistant with my own essay, and I want to pay it forward. For those of you working on your personal statements right now, feel free to DM me and I would be happy to give you some feedback on your draft for FREE. No strings attached. If you like the initial feedback I provide on your essay and you’re interested in using a service for your PS, we can talk more about working together! I want to say that there are plenty of applicants who DO NOT NEED TO USE AN EDITING SERVICE. There are people here and over on the prePA subreddit who will offer to help with your personal statement. Use them. Seriously. That being said, some essays need a lot more work than others, and in those cases working with a service (any personal statement editing service with a solid reputation, not just mine) can be helpful. Either way, I’m happy to read through things and give you some pointers, even if you’re not interested in using my paid service. If you want more information about my service, would like to check out reviews from students I helped this past cycle or are interested in reading articles I have written about the writing process, you can take a look at my page here: https://m.facebook.com/thepersonalstatementproject/
  17. Writing a personal statement is one of the most difficult parts of the application process. For some, it may be the single most daunting and intimidating aspect of applying to PA school. The personal statement is something I have discussed here before, with previous articles addressing what the personal statement is and the best way to go about writing it. If you already have a solid understanding of the purpose of the personal statement and have an idea of how you will approach the writing process, you may be thinking about what pitfalls you should try to avoid. After reading and critiquing nearly a hundred personal statements over the last year, I’ve learned that most applicants are all making the same mistakes when writing their essays. In a two part series over the next two weeks, I will be sharing the biggest mistakes applicants are making when writing their personal statement. Here are the first five: 1. Forgetting the Question at Hand - This one is huge, and I tend to make comments about this concept on almost every essay that I read. The purpose of the personal statement is to explain who you are while answering the question, “Why PA?” It really is that simple, and because of that it’s so easy to lose sight of why you’re writing in the first place. I get to the end of so many essays and think, “I have no idea why you want to be a PA.” Which is a huge issue. My advice is to make sure you aren’t getting so caught up in the details of sharing your story that you forget the question at hand. When speaking about your experiences, work to explain how they furthered your interest in the PA profession. Continue to speak directly to that idea throughout the entirety of your essay. 2. Speaking in Generalities - Many applicants write about how they’re interested in medicine or healthcare… but there are so many careers that allow you to work in medicine and healthcare! Be sure that your essay is addressing the PA profession directly. Don’t say that you want to work in healthcare, or that your goal is to be a great provider. Say that you want to be a PA, and tell the reader explicitly why. 3. Telling too Many Stories - Applicants often tell too many stories centered around other people in their personal statement. Often times, each paragraph is a patient story, or a story about a provider they shadowed or have worked with. Your personal statement should not be a series of observations about others. Tell one or two stories about other people, max. Make sure sure that your essay is still about you. And be certain to share your insights on how these experiences furthered your desire to become a PA. 4. Not Telling a Coherent Story - Oftentimes I read through an essay and find that there is nothing that is connecting each of the individual paragraphs. The essay will feel disjointed and scattered, creating a big distraction for the reader. One remedy for this is to identify a theme. You don’t necessarily need to construct a dramatic literary device - a theme can be subtle. Having some kind of running thread throughout your essay that can provide a backbone to relate all your stories helps with continuity. Overall, a theme can make an essay much easier to read. 5. Transitions - This is my absolute, number one personal pet peeve. Seriously, it kills me. I would say that in about 80% of the essays I read I end up writing, “How does this paragraph relate to the last? These are two completely unrelated ideas and you’re in need of a transition.” I find that applicants will regularly paste five paragraphs into a document, with each paragraph having no connection to the next. Starting a new paragraph is NOT a transition. Transitions are so important, as they’re the glue that will hold your essay together. Do not abandon basic grammar and writing rules just because the personal statement is a format that you’re uncomfortable with. Be sure that each paragraph feeds into the next. Much like a theme, transitions create flow throughout an essay and they’re integral to creating a seamless, easy to read personal statement. Keep these common mistakes in mind throughout the writing process. Check back next week when I will share five more of the biggest mistakes that applicants make when writing their personal statements.
  18. Hey everyone, I am a recent college graduate (December 2018) and I have been interested in PA for about 3 years now and with my recent graduation I’m sure you all can relate to the panick of the uncertainty of my life that I just stepped into . I’ve mostly been curious about my competitiveness for this upcoming cycle (2019-2020). Here are my stats Overall GPA:3.494 sGPA: 3.54 Last 60 hours: 3.65 Side Note: I initially had a 2.8 GPA freshmen year and worked my tail off to get where I am now. After I transferred to a new school beginning Junior year I made 24 A’s to 7 B’s with no C’s or D’s. I know schools take into account upward trends and if that isn’t one then I don’t know what is! HCE/PCE:By time of application will have have about 750 hours with 300 being a Home Health Aid and 450 as a PT Aide. For schools who do not have rolling admissions I will wait until about late July to apply so that would bring me to around 1000 hours LOR: Gastrointestinal Oncology PA, DPT who is my supervisor at work, Chemistry Proffesor Shadowing: 100 hours shadowing Oncology PA, Family Practice NP; Oncology MD GRE: Verbal: 153 Quant: 150 Volunteer Hours: Over 500hours through my fraternity,NAACP, and my own efforts. Mostly registering people to vote, educating minors on sexual health, March of Dimes, and various other projects me and my fraternity brothers could think of. I believe this will be the strongest part of my application. I have a ton of other experiences of volunteer/community service I could speak of but that would take hours to type out My personal statement will more than likely focus on my experience with the many different types of clients I have dealt with as a HHA. Going into someone’s home is a direct view into their life and lifestyle and the differences and experiences between each is so unique it’s jaw dropping. I’ve had some crazy experiences to say the least I appreciate any feedback. Thank you all! *Added some updates so I decided to bump!
  19. Hello all, I have worked full-time and PRN for the last three years gathering PCE. However, how do you calculate those hours when you do not have a set schedule? I have gone as far as to try to add up all the hours I have on each paystub (I view them online) but it is extremely tedious. I have worked in two acute hospitals, two SNFs, and an inpatient rehab facility. The hospitals, one SNF, and the inpatient rehab facility are all for the same company (when you are PRN you float to different pavilions). I have noticed that CASPA will ask you your job type, which would be per diem for me, but still asks how many hours a week. If your weekly hours vary, is your best bet to just count up your total hours and make sure whatever you fill in does not exceed that amount? Thank you in advance!
  20. Hello! I know this post is stereotypical and repetitive and I apologize, but feedback would be very appreciative Stats are below, should I apply this cycle? Or wait till next year? I’m currently on my first gap year. cGPA: 3.7, sGPA 3.6 bio major with minirs in psych and chem, in 3 national honor societies (psych, bio, chem), academic award in my major, Dean’s list every semester Presented original research at 2 colleges By mid march I will have about 1000 PCE hours as an EMT I also started a per diem HCE job as a patient sitter in the ED. GRE is between 295-299 (can’t remember exact number), thinking of retaking If it helps, during college I have about 120 hours as a volunteer crew member for my school’s EMS unit If I’m forgetting something, let me know! Again thanks so much, I know how annoying these posts can be sometimes and I appreciate you taking the time to read this have an awesome day!
  21. Please see attached PDF. We are a new program in NJ. We received a $5M gift from an alum and we now have state of the art facilities, over 70 clinical partnerships, and we are accepting 50 students in our first class. Attend virtually to find out why the College of Saint Elizabeth in Morristown NJ is the right choice for you! CSE PA Virtual OH postcard, 1-24-19.pdf
  22. Hello everyone! I recently decided to choose the PA route during the last quarter of my senior year (graduated 2018) and I have been taking a few pre reqs to catch up. As of now, I will technically have my pre reqs done by early June. However I planned to retake Chemistry because I had 2 C’s in the class and I want the schools to see that I can do well in Chemistry. The retake classes wouldn’t finish until mid August (at the latest). My question: Do you guys think it’s better to send in my app early in June, especially since I’m planning to apply for some schools with rolling admissions? Or should I wait until I get my grades back from the retake and send my app by late August? My undergrad GPA right now is around sGPA: 3.25 and cGPA: 3.425 (this is based on my own calculation while following “how to calculate your GPA” on CASPA’s website). This doesn’t include my post bacc work with pre reqs and I’m hoping my GPA will go up too after classes. The schools I'm looking at are mostly in CA (and a few out of state) and are ok with a C for prereqs. And they are ok with having "in-progress" coursework on CASPA. Thank you!
  23. Hi everyone. I am planning on applying for my second time this upcoming April 2019. This past cycle i decided to apply in June 2018 and didn’t get my apps in until late July. I just applied to two programs that i already qualified for. I think my main error last cycle was applying so late and to so few schools. I should’ve just waited until this cycle, but it is okay because now i am more prepared and have a bulkier application. If anyone could give me advice on areas to improve on that’d be great! Bachelors in Respiratory Care (2017) cGPA: 3.4 (Caspa 2018 calculation) sGpa:3.4 (Casap 2018 calculation) Since last cycle i have taken or i plan to have completed before this cycle: Bio 2(A),Chem 2(A), Genetics (A), Orgo I (TBD, estimating a B+ to be on the safe side), Stat (TBD, est A). This should bring my GPA up to at least a 3.5 - 3.6ish? 3,300 hrs PCE as a Registered Respiratory Therapist (full time current career) 100 hrs volunteer/HCE medical mission trip to Peru. 25 volunteer hours from various events in college 500 hrs leadership experience for running student run organization in college(dance team) 4 years of being on college dance team. 700 hrs non HCE work as nanny of 3 children including one autistic child 24 hrs PA shadowing (cardiac surgery, critical care/pulmonary, plastic surgery) GRE: scheduled for March 30 (have started studying, hoping for a 300) LOR: 1 PA I shadowed, 1 from my Respiratory Care Manager, and one from my Resporatory peogram director/professor(?). I can probably do another PA if that would look better, but I know some schools require a professor Any criticism would be helpful! My goal is to apply before May 15th this cycle to about 7 schools! Thanks in advance everyone!
  24. Second time, older applicant looking to reapply this coming cycle -- CASPA verified early this past cycle with low GPA (2.93) and outstanding prereqs, which led to 5 app submissions and prompt rejections. Hoping that I've improved, but still looking for advice on how I can try to standout being on the low GPA end of things and thoughts on retaking the GRE! Undergrad Degree (2008): BS in Comm Studies & Rhetoric PostBacc (2016-2019) cGPA: 3.3 (undergrad, 3.3) sGPA: currently 3.13 (undergrad, 2.63) -- if I get an A in Immunology (3 credits) this coming Spring, I will have a sGPA of 3.18; if I take 4 credits and get an A, I will have a 3.2 Post-Bacc GPA: 3.6 Disclosure: DUI conviction 10 yrs ago Pre-req courses: Biostats: B- Psych: A Bio1: A Bio2: A A&P1: B- Gen Chem1: C+ (W from 5 yrs ago when I enrolled and dropped) Gen Chem2: C+ A&P2: A- BioChem: A MicroBio: A Genetics: A- Pending Immunology course this Spring GRE: 306, V158--Q148--W3.5 LoRs: 2 oncology attendings/primary investigators; 1 PA; 1 NP; 1 academic letter -- bio prof Hours: PCE: By the time I apply, 7074 hrs (8 yrs clinical research coordinator, CRC, in oncology clinical research) HCE: 7074 hrs (8 yrs clinical research associate, CRA, in oncology clinical research) Research: 1572 hrs Volunteer: 50 hrs, helping at a homeless clinic since Jan 2018 PA shadowing: 28 hrs surgical oncology and pediatric oncology I split my hours as 45% PCE/45% HCE /10% Research CRC - in the clinic w/patients (interviewing pts about PMH, one-on-one pt research interviews regarding Quality of Life, discussing & outlining the patient's course of treatment on vs. off-protocol, discussing the goals and medical implications of participating and answering questions about treatment, recruitment, and screening & assessing patient toxicities in clinic with physicians/PAs and through chart reviews, etc) CRA - clerical in regards to submitting necessary safety paperwork, chart reviews for tox assessments, scheduling patient appts, ordering necessary protocol labs and scans, data collection and entry, editing the research protocol, audit preparation, etc. Research - time spent more specifically pulling, sorting, and analyzing data for publications, mtgs with the stats team, MDs, etc.
  25. Hi Everyone, I noticed there was no thread for this yet so I thought I would get it started. Good luck!
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