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  1. Hi, I wanted to start this topic to see if anyone doing the MPH/MPA dual degree program is active on the forum! I hope to hear back soon!
  2. Hello everyone, I wanted to create a group thread discussing the potential pros/cons of pursuing the PA/MPH route! I'd love to hear everyone's thoughts on the new dual degree program.
  3. Hello All, I am relatively new to the pre-PA profession but after a lot of soul searching, I am going to apply again to schools this year. Last year, I only applied to 5 schools. I need help deciding what to do between now and application time. I know there's only a few months left before CASPA opens, but any help is appreciated. Here are some stats about me: Undergrad GPA Overall: 2.5 Science: 2.4 MPH GPA Overall: 3.8 Science classes (2): 4.0 Post-bacc GPA (1 year): Overal: 3.85 Science: 4.0 (got a B in calculus) Misc: Took sociology online (A), anatomy and physio for my masters online (A), and taking psychology this semester online (hopefully get an A). Critique my plan please: I had no luck last cycle, a 310 composite GPA and a 6/6 on the writing portion, 1000+ PCE, working in biotech now (pays well so not sure if I need to switch jobs for more PCE, would rather work on weekends in PCE if possible), 2000+ HCE Plan: Apply earlier this time for sure. Applied in October last time My undergrad gpa had so many credits from me not passing classes, hence the MPH (which I love the subject but quickly found it is not a lucrative career to pay back student loans) and post bacc Retaking psychology online Hopefully taking micro online for the first time Maybe taking ochem/biochem online again Stats for pre reqs: Gen chem (A), bio (A), ochem (C), anatomy/physio (A), sociology (A), psychology (C), stats (A), english (A) Should I just retake the pre reqs? Should I fill in some science classes? I think I redid how long it will take me to bring up my GPA to above a 3.0 for both and it's another year of full time classes MAYBE to get a 3.0 I have no shadowing, so planning to shadow a PA (I've shadowed an MD and DO) applying to MA jobs (I was an MA without the certification) targeting schools that emphasize the last 60 units calling/emailing schools to ask if they will take my app if below a 3.0 Any help/advice would be greatly appreciated! I work full time in biotech right now and would love to stay working if possible. I know my GPA is a low point hence me trying to fix it. Thank you!
  4. So I applied to a dual degree program. They rejected me for PA but accepted me into their MPH. I think public health is interesting but I wouldn't say it's a huge passion of mine. I thought a good backup plan if I don't get into PA this cycle is to just do the MPH. Not sure how it will play out as I am still waiting on a ton of schools. It's in a great area, so I know I'll like being at that school, and the opportunities are great in the MPH program. However, I'm also concerned about being in a bucketload of debt with two master's degrees by the time I finish, but at the same time moving out of home and scrambling for a bunch of jobs and volunteer work to afford rent and living expenses seems very stressful(my other backup plan). Would it be better to pursue the master's or just work for another year or two, if worst case scenario I don't get into PA school this cycle?
  5. Hi all, I am 26 years old, interested in applying to PA school next April. I would like advice from current PAs, other PA school applicants, and current PA school students regarding my chances in getting accepted. Education: MPH in Epidemiology (cumulative GPA 3.77) BS in Biology (cumulative GPA 3.64) Certifications: Certified in Public Health (CPH) Work Experience: Current Research Coordinator in Oncology/Genetics field (full-time, 2+ years) Research Assistant in Oncology/Genetics field (full-time for 6 months) Scribe in Primary Care office (1.8 years, ~2600 hours) Scribe in Emergency Dept. & Ophthalmology clinic (1.25 years, ~2500 hours) Volunteer Experience: Two medical/dental mission trips to Honduras (2 weeks, ~100 hours) Hospital volunteer in Emergency Dept. & Pediatric unit (1 year, ~500 hours) Research Experience: 1 peer-reviewed publication, second author 1 oral presentation, first author I plan to take A&P I/II over the next year at a community college (since I did not take this in undergrad) and will be retaking my GRE (old scores were 152 verbal, 153 quantitative, & 3.5 writing). I am considering becoming certified as a Phlebotomist or CNA and work part-time (along with my research coordinator job) to up my HCE experience - would this improve my chances? Thanks in advance!!
  6. Hi! I am a soon-to-be grad and I just received an ED offer. I'd like to hear your thoughts. $65/hour base pay (128h/month min) with RVU additionally up to $20/hour. 1.5x base on holidays. 401k with 5% match. Partial health insurance coverage. 1500 CME Malpractice claims made with tail NO PTO (coming to terms that most don't offer this in EDs) The benefits leave a lot to be desired but the hourly seems decent for a new grad. What do you think? Thank you!
  7. Hello Everyone! Thank you for taking the time to read my post. I’m new to the PA Forum, but I desperately need some advice! I am fortunate enough to have been accepted to the dual PA/MPH (Master’s of Public Health) program at Yale and the PA program (MPH is pending) at Emory. However, I’m having a very difficult time deciding between the two so if you have any advice, have gone to either school, or have even been in this position before, I’d love to hear what you have to say! Brief summary: My goal is to be a PA, but my interests are currently in infectious disease and the prevention of such, education of underserved populations, the effects of a booming population on healthcare, and global health. I am extremely interested in working for the CDC or WHO and love international medicine. Eventually, I may get into health policy. I love travel, have lived in a sunny, dry state with lots of things to do outdoors, and enjoy smart, successful, but REAL people. Here are my impressions of the schools (please correct me if I'm mistaken!) Yale (New Haven, CT): THE GOOD • The prestigious name – it’s not everything, but it certainly gives me a sense of pride, make my family proud, and it could unlock a lot of doors for me in my future. • Yale has a “Master’s of Public Health: Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases” program that has a large laboratory component – this is exactly what I want. I love being in the lab and this is my exact interest in public health. • Medical Spanish – Yale offers its students this class as a supplemental learning experience for PAs. Awesome, as I used to be fluent in Spanish and would love to travel internationally. • Global Health Concentration – this is a great bonus and would help me expand my global experience/education. • Amenities – Yale boasts great museums and coffee shops that are sprinkled through New Haven, it’s also a plus that you can walk around the entire town in a matter of hours. • Downs Fellowship – this funds a 6 week international work/research experience over the summer. If I play my cards right, this could count for my thesis and summer practicum. • Networking – it’s Yale, correct me if I’m mistaken by assuming that I would meet some of the best and brightest people in their fields. • Clinical rotations seem limited – I don’t believe you have a say in anywhere you go and I didn’t get the impression that the school affiliations were too wide-spread. I don’t want to do all of my rotations at the same hospital. They do, however, offer an international rotation, which is super cool. THE NOT SO GOOD • Safety – I’ve heard that the area has a decent amount of crime and, being a petite female, this is a big concern on mine. • Campus – while the undergraduate campus is beautiful, the medical campus seems removed and a bit undesirable. To be fair, it was snowing the day that I went for my interview, so I probably didn’t get to see as much as I could’ve. • The atmosphere – the few people I met there (like less than 10) didn’t seem very happy to be there. In fact, I got the feeling that many of them where there for the name. That’s fine and all, but I like to have a supportive community of REAL people who are smart but also care about things other than school. • Cost – It’s about $15,000 more expensive than Emory. • Weather – I hear it’s gloomy and cold up there. I’m not sure how humid it gets though. I have lived my entire life in a sunny, dry place and NEED sunshine. • There aren’t a lot of volunteer/student involvement opportunities there (besides the Free Clinic). Emory (Atlanta, Georgia): THE GOOD: • Close proximity to the CDC – As someone who would really love to work for the CDC, the fact that the CDC Headquarters is on Emory campus is HUGE. Not only would it allow me internship and networking opportunities, but many of my public health classes would be taught by CDC employees. • Farm Worker’s Project – A two week medical trip where students and faculty bring medical care to Southern farm workers. I did a trip to Ecuador like this a few years back and loved it. So rewarding. • The enclosed campus – while the campus itself is open to the public, when you are on campus, you are ON CAMPUS. The buildings are beautiful and the area feel clean and welcoming. • The people – the people I met seemed genuinely happy to be there and were more easy-going. • Opportunities – While Emory is not in downtown Atlanta (another plus), the area boasts great clinical rotations, restaurants, and social activities. • Great hospital affiliations – this makes for great rotation opportunities. THE NOT SO GOOD: • Humidity – I’m not a fan. But it might be just as humid in Connecticut? • It’s not as widely known – Again, the name isn’t the biggest deal, but it certainly makes things easier! • No concentration in infectious disease – I would be going for Global Epidemiology, but would have to use electives (I would probably only have time for 3 or so?) that are based on infectious diseases to make my “concentration”. This is a huge negative for me. Technically, they still haven’t accepted me (although, I’m not too concerned). Yale was willing to expedite review of the public health portion of my application so that I knew whether or not I was accepted to both programs within ONE WEEK. I submitted my public health application to Emory nearly 3 months ago now (and have also known that I was accepted to the PA program for 3 months as well). The Emory lag just makes me feel a bit like they don’t care. **These are just a few of the things that I have considered. I actually looked at 77 total characteristics of each, but the schools ended up being very similar in the end. If I am wrong about ANYTHING I have said above, PLEASE let me know! These are just the impressions I have gotten and would love to hear the opinions of real students or teachers! Thank you so much for reading this all!
  8. Hi all, I'm not sure if there is a thread about this topic elsewhere, however, I was unable to find one. I was hoping to get an option on doing a dual PA/MPH Program. Pretty much, I will be able to take 1-2 extra PH classes per semester with my normal PA schedule. However, I have up to 5 years to complete the MPH. Is there an advantage to having two masters in the field? Thank you in advance!
  9. My dad knocking at my bedroom door shouting, “we have to go!” turned out to be the most frightening day of my life. The apartment building we were in was engulfed in flames! From previous training as an EMT and Firefighter, my dad displayed an immense amount of courage instructing my brothers and I as we covered our faces and crawled behind each other until eventually we made it slowly outside with second degree burns. This was the day I learned that if one cannot run, than walk, if one cannot walk, than crawl and no matter how long it may take to reach the end it is optimism and determination that will push you through to finish. Thus, my path leading to medicine is distinct from others from previous struggles and experiences, but it is optimism and determination that is pushing me to become a phenomenal Health Practitioner. Following my dad’s footsteps, I became an EMT at the age of sixteen, but it was through unusual circumstances that I knew a career in medicine, specifically preventional medicine. Receiving wisdom from various patients as an EMT, one in particular stood out that I will never forget. This individual was plagued with diabetes at the age of nineteen. Currently, at the age of thirty and unmindful of medication, he one arm and bilateral leg amputations and almost complete blindness in both eyes. While speaking to this patient, I saw myself in his position lying on the stretcher with acute hypoglycemia because just like him, I too am an African American male with parents who suffer from diabetes. This was the moment my path towards medicine officially begun. Thus, from personal experiences I choose to dedicate my educational career around health prevention and understanding various causes that hinders medicine in the underserved and minority communities. I enrolled and graduated from Howard University with a major in Exercise Physiology with the ambition of entering the medical world. During undergraduate studies, I participated in a Summer Medical and Dental Education Program through the school for those interested in the field of medicine. Within this program, I received the experience of a lifetime by shadowing different facets of medicine from a medical director to clinical rotating physician assistants in an underserved environment. Through this program, I learned that everyday lived is a gift presented upon itself to benefit others in various positive and meaningful ways. Following undergraduate studies, I choose to gain a better understanding of the communities that I will one day influence by enrolling and completing a masters level degree in Public Health with an A grade average. Through this program, I gained knowledge and a better understanding of what affects different levels of life ranging from health, behavior, social, income, environment, and the list can go on. Studying within an underserved community, I have seen negative outcomes of racial disparity, such as perceived self-worth and futuristic outcomes. Hence, I eventually would like to alleviate such disparities resembling disproportional communities where I have been educated and grown by educating the community that is both comprehensive and applicable that focuses on the barriers within medicine. Concurrently with graduate studies, I worked as an ER Tech with a phenomenal team consisting of numerous welcoming Physician Assistants. As an ER Tech, I became more aware of the benefits surrounding the role of the PAs and how they support both physicians and patients. With a smaller patient load, PAs are able to provide a more intimate relationship with each patient and spend a greater amount of time understanding their individual needs and circumstances, which is something I truly do value. I have witnessed this directly lead to an increased satisfaction of patients, which I admire with a background as an EMT and in public health. Within these professions, presenting a great amount of empathy and compassion can open up many doors of information that people normally have a difficult time displaying, such as a previous history of drug abuse and sexual victimization. This differs from my experiences I have had when working with physicians when heavy volume of patients are too to allow such relationships. It became too frequent that I was asked to decipher physician's plan of care after the physician performed a rapid assessment in a comprehensive way. This observation allowed me to evolve as an individual to develop effective communicational skills. All-in-all, a career as a PA is ideal for me because compassion and confidence is instilled within every decision. From my past I've learned from my mistakes and as a person I've grown, matured, and have different priorities and skills than when I was 18. I hope that achieving a master degree with a 3.52 with my work history and job roles proves to you what I am truly capable of and what kind of person I am today.
  10. Hello. I had 4 interviews last cycle. I received 3 rejections and 1 alternate list. I am very thankful for being placed on alternate list, because it's not a straight no and I am still being considered. (Staying positive) The program did not mention how many candidates are placed on alternate list. It just says "small group." I will continue to apply for the next application cycle, but I was just wondering if anyone got accepted after placed on alternate list. The program starts in June, and it's already mid-April.
  11. Hello all, I have recently been accepted into a few different programs and I am trying to choose between two schools specifically. They are extremely different. One is the Unviersity of New England, a mid ranked school focused on primary care and rural medicine, emphasizing​ Interprofessional relationships. The other is the more "prestigious" George Washington University that offers a MPH in either epi, policy, or community health in addition. I have spoken to alumni of UNE and they have only positive things to say about the program. I feel that the GW program is very experienced and could possibly open up interesting opportunities later. However, how useful would an MPH degree be? Any alumni of a dual program out there, who could speak to how they used the dual degree in their professional life, whether practicing or doing work in public health? Between the schools, GW is at least $50,000 dollars more expensive and that is not including the MPH degree. Any respectful advice/thoughts would be appreciated.
  12. So I was wondering, but are there PAs that operates as a community leader? I usually see MD/DO/RNs working as a community leader in the position as a Health Officer and Medical Officer, but can PAs hold any positions such as Health Officer or Community Leader with such degrees as a MPH and/or DrPH....just curious.
  13. Good evening all, I was just wondering but how would CASPA calculate science GPA with a MPH degree. I know that the course title Public Health is calculated as other science, but how would it go about applying to all the courses. Im just wondering if anybody had an experience in apply to CASPA following an MPH. PUBH 500 GR EPIDEMIOLOGY I A 4.000 16.00 PUBH 502 GR SOCL & BHVRL HLTH SCI B 4.000 12.00 PUBH 504 GR PBLC HLTH & HLTH DSPRTS A 3.000 12.00 PUBH 512 GR BIOL BASIS OF PUBLIC HEALTH A 1.000 4.00 PUBH 501 GR STAT MTHDS PUB HLTH I B 4.000 12.00 PUBH 503 GR PLCY & HLTH SERV PLN MGMT I A 4.000 16.00 PUBH 506 GR ENVIRON HEALTH SCIENCES B 4.000 12.00 PUBH 005 GR PUBLIC HEALTH GRADUATE COMP P 0.000 0.00 PUBH 518 GR INTERNSHIP II (MPH) S 3.000 0.00 PUBH 610 GR PBLC HLTH SYSTMS THINKING B 3.000 9.00 PUBH 618 GR CMNTY BASED PARTCPNT RSCH A 3.000 12.00 PUBH 623 GR COMMUNITY NEEDS SOLUTION A 3.000 12.00 PUBH 607 GR INTEGRATING EXPERIENCE B 3.000 9.00 PUBH 714 GR SPECIAL STUDIES B 3.000 9.00 PUBH 720 GR QUALITATIVE RSCH IN PUB HEALTH A 3.000 12.00 PUBH 743 GR COMMUNITY SOLUTIONS II A 2.000 8.00
  14. Hello!! I am torn on whether or not to list my wonderful MPH research experience on CASPA. CASPA clearly states that research done for credit should not be listed... so I am instructed not to list it. However, the grading system that is used for my thesis is S/US, which capsa doesn't recognize as for credit. Oh, bother. I think this question is really about what kind of research has been done outside of the auspices of academics, which this does not fall into. Any thoughts? Many thank yous in advance, and forgive if this question is more straightforward that I perceive it to be! D
  15. From the AAPA Facebook page: "Working in Oz PAs can now work in Queensland, Australia. Last month, the Queensland Department of Health issued guidelines on "Physician Assistant (PA) Clinical Governance." This now means PAs can work throughout the health sector in this state. Thanks to PA Rod Hooker for bringing this to our attention." http://www.health.qld.gov.au/qhpolicy/docs/gdl/qh-gdl-397.pdf I'm an Aussie citizen and would love to work there one day (a while down the road...). Anyone know of good resources for employment opportunities/job boards for Oz?
  16. Just curious, who's interviewing in Seattle on the 25th?! There are threads for the other locations but none for this interview session so I thought I'd start one. I'll be there! Flying in from Utah and pretty excited to see what Washington has to offer!
  17. Hello, I'm an aspiring PA student and I have done a lot of research on the differences between MPAS and MPAS/MPH, but lots of the articles I found online reference money and big picture goals for PA's with MPH. They don't really narrow in on differences between jobs you may acquire, leadership positions, or any other true benefit past what you can achieve with just your MPAS. Are there any practicing PA's out there and/or students with enough familiarity with this topic to persuade students considering both? i.e. Why would I want to spend 50-70k more and about 8-12 months more to achieve a MPH on top of becoming a PA? Thank you all for your time
  18. Hey everybody, Probably not the most original post but here it goes - after a few years on the pre-med path I am starting to seriously consider PA school. I graduated undergrad last May with a decent GPA ~ 3.5, took the MCAT last January and got a 27. At that time I felt DO school was the right choice for me but within the last two weeks my doubts have accumulated to the point where I am now posting on this forum. I work as a medical scribe in an ER and seeing the PAs in action has inspired me. I like the position of working with doctors in that setting without necessarily seeing myself as a doctor. Not to mention the sacrifice of becoming a doctor honestly scares me. I know a fellow scribe who got into a PA/MPH program at Arcadia University, which happens accept the MCAT, encourage rotations abroad (which highly interests me), and is conveniently located in where my family is. I also like the idea of earning a second degree in case I get tired of clinical work. Also, she claims that with the help of my boss, my hours a medical scribe (technically not patient care hours) were accepted by Arcadia. The only thing that bugs me about the PA programs are that I have to take additional bio classes included anatomy, physiology, and micro. I know in the Philly area, this probably isn't a big deal, but if there is any way of bypassing any of these requirements, or any other schools with less strict requirements, I would be very interested. If not, where would be the best place to take these classes? I'm also wondering if I should take the GRE anyway, and if it is an issue if I ask a doctor for a recommendation instead of a PA (I don't work directly with PAs). Lastly are there any unexpected downsides of doing a dual degree program? Yeah, I'm all over the place but any advice would be greatly appreciated!
  19. I am confused on the CASPA section regarding listing duties from past work experience/medical experience/volunteer experience/etc. That section, I do believe, allows 40 words which is alot. Is this section supposed to be written in complete sentences or the typical fragmented style usually used on resumes? Anyone that could help!? Thanks!
  20. Any tips on things to add or change would be greatly appreciated! As you guys know, these can be tough to get out. My conclussion is week but I'm blanking on ways to wrap this up. “Welcome to Kyrgyzstan!” my taxi driver greeted me in Russian after I had loaded my luggage into the trunk of his decades-old Lada. Arriving well past midnight on Turkish Airlines flight 346, I caught a fleeting glimpse of the mountainous Central Asian country that was to become my home as an English teacher for the next year as we sped past shuttered bazaars and Soviet-era highrises. Although I had focused on how environmental toxicants affect human health while conducting laboratory research as an undergraduate Environmental Protection Agency Fellow, actually getting on the ground in developing countries--from the desolate mountain villages of Kyrgyzstan to the war torn streets of Tajikistan-- led me to begin reflecting on the health disparities underserved populations face not only overseas but also in our own country. While my grandmother’s positive experiences with an orthopedic physician assistant (PA) who had stopped by her house to check on her after her knee replacement surgery and whom she still claims is “better than a doctor” had initially made me consider pursuing my passion for the study of medicine in the service of others as a PA, it was not until I was lying in an understaffed medical clinic in India midway through my year teaching in Kyrgyzstan that my dedication to pursuing this calling was truly cemented. Suffering a Grade Three concussion after a car I had been riding in had spun out of control and crashed into a building, I had been taken to a free clinic in Delhi to get my head stitched back together. Medical waste spilled out of overflowing trash cans and seemingly hundreds of coughing, bleeding, and sick Indians lined the hallways as the understaffed team sought to treat everyone. Due to the shortage of doctors and nurses, I was in the hospital nearly 14 hours before a medical attendant could provide the needed stitches. My experience with a hospital in a country with high rates of poverty and infectious diseases solidified my commitment to serving others through a hands-on medical career as a PA. I arrived home to Texas and began fervently pursuing this goal. Working in the Providence Hospital Emergency Room (ER) has provided me with an up-close look at the healthcare challenges the disadvantaged in Central Texas face, complementing my firsthand knowledge of global medical issues. These challenges include everything from lack of insurance to substance abuse problems that cause permanent physical and mental damage. I have sat for several hours with an elderly Alzheimer’s patient who almost brought tears to my eyes while we waited for her test results and witnessed the emotional pain on a woman’s face when she was told an ectopic pregnancy would have to be surgically removed. In such cases I am struck by the indomitable spirit and inherent decency of people even in situations that are truly heartbreaking. The people I have met while volunteering in the ER inspire and challenge me to continue pursuing a calling to serve others through medicine. While frequently all I can offer is a much-too-small helping hand or comforting words, these are usually more greatly appreciated than I initially thought they would be. It is because of a burning desire to be able to do more for people such as these, a wish to practice medicine while also leading a fulfilling life dedicated jointly to my patients and my family, and many positive experiences shadowing PAs that I desire to become a one myself. The Kyrgyz taxi driver pulled up to the curve of the apartment building of the Russian family I would be living with for the next few months and I hopped out of the cab into the frigid night air. I was nervous, but excited. New adventures were on the horizon. While I did not know the sometimes seemingly indomitable challenges that awaited my life and work in Kyrgyzstan, I was ready to begin tackling them. Looking back at the year I spent in Central Asia, I now know we often grow the most in times of hardship. When I take my first step onto a medical college on my journey to become a PA, I will bring with me a commitment to service above self, academic excellence, and continued personal growth. Conclusion here...?
  21. For anyone interested in the PA MPH program, I started a blog about my experiences as a PA MPH student (I am currently in my second semester). I really enjoyed reading PA student blogs when I was applying to PA schools I felt they gave a perspective into a program you really couldn't find elsewhere. However, I didn't find any pertaining to any PA MPH programs, so I started my own. Maybe you'll it useful if you're considering applying for, or accepting a spot in a dual degree program. The URL is included in my signature below.
  22. I'm a PA/MPH dual degree, halfway through a three year program, whew! Just wanted to say hi to my fellow duals and see if there is anyone else like me on this forum...
  23. Hi there - I have an MPH and have worked in national and local-level public health for the past 5 years (including time in grad school) and am currently working as an epidemiologist overseas (with a CDC program). I have always been drawn to clinical care though, and am really drawn to type of care provided by a PA. I know that traditionally, clinical roles in public health, and especially epidemiology, have been filled by MD/MPHs (and sometimes RN/MPHs). I have experience in Infectious and Chronic Disease Epi, Public Health Research, and Disease Surveillance, and would love to bring a clinical perspective to these areas. However - I am worried that there may be some barriers to PA's obtaining positions in these roles. In other words, I'm wondering what opportunities there are in public health and epidemiology for a PA/MPH? Would love to hear real-life experiences of anyone, themselves or those they know. Thanks!
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