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Found 11 results

  1. Hello! I feel blessed to be coming to you guys with such a problem, but it's been weighing on me and need advice from current PA-S's and PA-C's. I have been accepted to two schools: School A which is 20 minutes away from my current living space and School B which is closer to my parents, but still about an hour away. Schools A and B seem pretty comparable in terms of curriculum, program length (A: 27 mo versus B: 25 mo), PANCE pass rates (A: 97 versus B: 99), tuition (a difference of 3K), and employment rates after graduation. The main differences that I see are that school B is associated with a medical school, so networking opportunities and strength in name and that school B will end up costing almost 40K more due to cost of living expenses. School B was my top choice prior to interviewing but was not the first school to get back to me, therefore, I have not placed my deposit. School B is also where most of my college friends settled and has an opportunity for research, which is important to me. School A has cheaper living costs, and somewhat of a support system from my current workplace friends. l have seen two basic schools of thought for this quandary, which include: Go to the cheapest school, you'll thank yourself later. Go to the school that you will regret not going to if you choose otherwise. Do you agree with either of these or have your own idea based on your own experience? Any anecdotes proving either correct or other statements would be helpful. Thanks in advance!
  2. Hello All, Time has come for me to decide between Pace University (Lenox Hill in NYC) and Rosalind Franklin (North Chicago). Rosalind Franklin is higher ranked, costs an estimated $40,000 less, has a smaller class size, is interprofessional, is closer to my hometown (I can see my parents more often, they're older), and I felt like their curriculum was better organized. The main pros to Pace is the location (who wouldn't want to live in Manhattan!), and ties to hospitals in NYC- I could see myself living and working in a big city like NYC post graduation. I'm reaching out to this forum, desperate for advice- which school would you choose and why? I feel like my heart is pulling me to NYC, but my logical choice based on cost and ranking would be Rosalind Franklin. Anyone who's heard about either program and/or has first hand insight, I would GREATLY appreciate it. Best, Rosie
  3. Hello Everyone! Thank you for taking the time to read my post. I’m new to the PA Forum, but I desperately need some advice! I am fortunate enough to have been accepted to the dual PA/MPH (Master’s of Public Health) program at Yale and the PA program (MPH is pending) at Emory. However, I’m having a very difficult time deciding between the two so if you have any advice, have gone to either school, or have even been in this position before, I’d love to hear what you have to say! Brief summary: My goal is to be a PA, but my interests are currently in infectious disease and the prevention of such, education of underserved populations, the effects of a booming population on healthcare, and global health. I am extremely interested in working for the CDC or WHO and love international medicine. Eventually, I may get into health policy. I love travel, have lived in a sunny, dry state with lots of things to do outdoors, and enjoy smart, successful, but REAL people. Here are my impressions of the schools (please correct me if I'm mistaken!) Yale (New Haven, CT): THE GOOD • The prestigious name – it’s not everything, but it certainly gives me a sense of pride, make my family proud, and it could unlock a lot of doors for me in my future. • Yale has a “Master’s of Public Health: Epidemiology of Microbial Diseases” program that has a large laboratory component – this is exactly what I want. I love being in the lab and this is my exact interest in public health. • Medical Spanish – Yale offers its students this class as a supplemental learning experience for PAs. Awesome, as I used to be fluent in Spanish and would love to travel internationally. • Global Health Concentration – this is a great bonus and would help me expand my global experience/education. • Amenities – Yale boasts great museums and coffee shops that are sprinkled through New Haven, it’s also a plus that you can walk around the entire town in a matter of hours. • Downs Fellowship – this funds a 6 week international work/research experience over the summer. If I play my cards right, this could count for my thesis and summer practicum. • Networking – it’s Yale, correct me if I’m mistaken by assuming that I would meet some of the best and brightest people in their fields. • Clinical rotations seem limited – I don’t believe you have a say in anywhere you go and I didn’t get the impression that the school affiliations were too wide-spread. I don’t want to do all of my rotations at the same hospital. They do, however, offer an international rotation, which is super cool. THE NOT SO GOOD • Safety – I’ve heard that the area has a decent amount of crime and, being a petite female, this is a big concern on mine. • Campus – while the undergraduate campus is beautiful, the medical campus seems removed and a bit undesirable. To be fair, it was snowing the day that I went for my interview, so I probably didn’t get to see as much as I could’ve. • The atmosphere – the few people I met there (like less than 10) didn’t seem very happy to be there. In fact, I got the feeling that many of them where there for the name. That’s fine and all, but I like to have a supportive community of REAL people who are smart but also care about things other than school. • Cost – It’s about $15,000 more expensive than Emory. • Weather – I hear it’s gloomy and cold up there. I’m not sure how humid it gets though. I have lived my entire life in a sunny, dry place and NEED sunshine. • There aren’t a lot of volunteer/student involvement opportunities there (besides the Free Clinic). Emory (Atlanta, Georgia): THE GOOD: • Close proximity to the CDC – As someone who would really love to work for the CDC, the fact that the CDC Headquarters is on Emory campus is HUGE. Not only would it allow me internship and networking opportunities, but many of my public health classes would be taught by CDC employees. • Farm Worker’s Project – A two week medical trip where students and faculty bring medical care to Southern farm workers. I did a trip to Ecuador like this a few years back and loved it. So rewarding. • The enclosed campus – while the campus itself is open to the public, when you are on campus, you are ON CAMPUS. The buildings are beautiful and the area feel clean and welcoming. • The people – the people I met seemed genuinely happy to be there and were more easy-going. • Opportunities – While Emory is not in downtown Atlanta (another plus), the area boasts great clinical rotations, restaurants, and social activities. • Great hospital affiliations – this makes for great rotation opportunities. THE NOT SO GOOD: • Humidity – I’m not a fan. But it might be just as humid in Connecticut? • It’s not as widely known – Again, the name isn’t the biggest deal, but it certainly makes things easier! • No concentration in infectious disease – I would be going for Global Epidemiology, but would have to use electives (I would probably only have time for 3 or so?) that are based on infectious diseases to make my “concentration”. This is a huge negative for me. Technically, they still haven’t accepted me (although, I’m not too concerned). Yale was willing to expedite review of the public health portion of my application so that I knew whether or not I was accepted to both programs within ONE WEEK. I submitted my public health application to Emory nearly 3 months ago now (and have also known that I was accepted to the PA program for 3 months as well). The Emory lag just makes me feel a bit like they don’t care. **These are just a few of the things that I have considered. I actually looked at 77 total characteristics of each, but the schools ended up being very similar in the end. If I am wrong about ANYTHING I have said above, PLEASE let me know! These are just the impressions I have gotten and would love to hear the opinions of real students or teachers! Thank you so much for reading this all!
  4. https://www.aapa.org/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=6442451423 Just saw this on C-1; the AAPA's response to the VA proposal for APRN full practice authority.
  5. Hello all, I have recently been accepted into a few different programs and I am trying to choose between two schools specifically. They are extremely different. One is the Unviersity of New England, a mid ranked school focused on primary care and rural medicine, emphasizing​ Interprofessional relationships. The other is the more "prestigious" George Washington University that offers a MPH in either epi, policy, or community health in addition. I have spoken to alumni of UNE and they have only positive things to say about the program. I feel that the GW program is very experienced and could possibly open up interesting opportunities later. However, how useful would an MPH degree be? Any alumni of a dual program out there, who could speak to how they used the dual degree in their professional life, whether practicing or doing work in public health? Between the schools, GW is at least $50,000 dollars more expensive and that is not including the MPH degree. Any respectful advice/thoughts would be appreciated.
  6. I'm currently a Pre-PA student that will be applying in the 2016-2017 application process. Below are my current stats (only missing this upcoming spring semester) and the schools I'm looking at applying to. Hoping to get some insight from others who have applied to or been accepted into PA programs as to whether or not my stats qualify me for the programs I'm considering applying to. STATS Undergrad Ed School: University of Northern Iowa, BA in Biology Cumulative Undergrad GPA: 3.67 Science Undergrad GPA: 3.43 Age at Application Time: 24 GRE scores Verbal: 155 Quantitative: 155 Writing: 3.0 Healthcare Experience Hours: CNA in nursing home over when home from school over summers and on breaks for 2 yrs (~800 hours) Personal Care Attendant for quadriplegic man for 4 yrs (~1000 hours) Patient Care Technician in Cardiovascular Unit of Hospital for 1.5 yrs (~1500 hours) Total = ~3300 hours Extracurricular/Research Activities: Research Assistant - 2 semesters Teaching Assistant for Anatomy & Physiology - 1 semester Neuroscience Research Assistant in Taipei, Taiwan - 1 summer (~3 months) Vice President of Campus Ministry Organization - 2 semesters Student Leader in Campus Ministry Organization - 3 semesters Tech Manager and Sunday School Teacher at Church - 2 yrs Director of Professional Development for Profession-Related Student Organization - 1 semester In-Patient Pharmacy Volunteer at Hospital - 2 semesters Schools Considering Applying To: - University of Iowa - Des Moines University - Oregon Health & Science University - University of Wisconsin-Madison - Marquette University - University of Nebraska - University of Colorado OR Wake Forest University (trying to decide which one to apply to) Any educated opinions or advice would be appreciated! Am I setting my sights too high??
  7. DREXEL UNIVERSITY vs. A.T. STILL UNIVERSITY I received my offers only a few days apart, ATSU before Drexel. Before any of my interviews, Drexel was my number one choice. Looking back, I had little basis for this, other than its reputation and I’ve got a friend who is a first student there who rants and raves about it. My first interview was at Drexel, so I was naturally very nervous. I had no clue what to expect, it was an all day experience and I felt brain fried and overwhelmed by the end. I thought I performed horribly during the individual interview (guess not, since I’ve been accepted), but also felt I was cut off with a lot of my answers. Also, certain tour faculty made some bad jokes, which I know were meant to be taken lightheartedly, but with my nerves, left with a tiny bad taste in my mouth. In all honestly, I felt as though Drexel was out of the question and that I would be denied or at best, waitlisted. The acceptance came as a complete shock, but a happy and grateful one. So that’s why I am in the predicament I am now. As far as my interview at ATSU, it was my favorite interview by FAR out of the 6 I’ve been on. It was my 5th interview. Extremely professional and thorough day. They made me really want to go here and I envisioned myself as a student there. It was the “gut feeling” I had hoped I would eventually find. I was sold on ATSU, it was my #1 choice, since I’d already mentally crossed Drexel off my list, but getting the Drexel phone call only a couple of days later, I now couldn’t be more confused. The gut feeling has drifted and I’m 50/50 divided. Truly. If it helps, cGPA: 3.50, sGPA: 3.43, GRE: 155 Q, 154 V, 4.0 Writing, 3 years HCE part-time (~1850 hours), 250 shadowing hours, 100 volunteer hours. LOCATION: For background, I’ve got no real geographical ties to either place. Love the heat and opportunity for outdoor/nature activities in AZ, but also love the city life of Drexel. I know that’s a little contradictory, but I could see myself in either place. I’m from the Midwest and as each year passes, I find myself becoming less tolerant of the unbearable cold weather. Philly wouldn’t be much of a change in that aspect. But, I fully understand that I’ll be locked inside a library 24/7 and won’t have much time for exploring in either place. But at least I’ll want to look out the window and be happy. With that…ROTATIONS: Drexel: First year in Philly, second year maybe in Philly and surrounding area, but I know a current student who is just starting their 2nd year and has rotations in PA, MI, NY, and SD…and is expected to pick up everything and move every 6 weeks. I know this is not unusual for a lot of programs) ATSU: First year in AZ, second year either in the surrounding Phoenix area (no relocation at all), OR relocate for the FULL year to a Community Health Center either in CA, WI, or GA. Less moving around. They are expanding their rotations, but this is a concern seeing as they were on probation for issues with this in the past. EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: Drexel: Attention to the underserved, rather general and consistent with most other programs across the nation. Liked it, great. ATSU: Entire emphasis on serving the underserved, and practicing with a holistic approach and incorporation of patient mind, body, and spirit. I love this aspect and am sincerely drawn to underserved populations, but am weary in that I’ve never practiced as a PA in an underserved setting before. Of course, I’m not writing a contract selling my life to the underserved by going here, but you get the point. RANKING: According to US News 2014… Drexel: 13 ATSU: 40 LEARNING STYLE: Drexel: Didn’t find a whole lot of difference between Drexel and ATSU in this department, but please correct me if I’m wrong. Drexel encourages self-directed learning, but does give a lot of exams to keep the student current and in check. They will really prepare me to be a graduate level, professional thinker. My friend in the program said that the class is broken up for smaller group learning, and enjoys that. ATSU: A lot of emphasis on out-of-seat and self-directed learning too, which I like. They mix it up with group work, different modules, etc. This would keep me focused and eager to learn instead of sitting in a chair, looking at a board for 8 hours a day. What really caught my attention is that on interview day, current students told us they rarely had sit down, formal exams, but instead were tested in other ways. I trust that I will be prepared for the PANCE at either school, based on percentages. COMPETITION: This is what I’ve gathered from my interview, talking with current students at both, and from what I’ve read. Obviously, in any program, there are going to be very competitive students and those who are not. I can associate and study with whomever I choose. Probably biased though. Drexel: More cut throat and competition between students. ATSU: More encouraging environment. AFFILIATIONS: Drexel: HUGE HUGE HUGE. Hahnemann Hospital. This will be potentially life changing, with all of the doors this opportunity may open for me, the connections I will make, etc. ATSU: No hospital affiliation. But is affiliated with other programs within Arizona School of Health Sciences. Doubt that affects much though. HISTORY: Drexel: One of the nation’s oldest programs. That means something with regards to the type of PAs they produce. ATSU: ASHS began in 1995, but moved to Mesa, AZ in 2001. So, it’s relatively new. BUT, home of the world’s first osteopathic medical school. CADAVER LAB: Of minimal importance to me. I took a full dissection cadaver lab in undergrad along site medical students. I know it’s not the same training as PA school, but at least I’ve had exposure. Drexel: No dissections. Limited access to cadavers. Lab work mostly done virtually. ATSU: Use human cadavers during the first year as a lab component to go along with anatomy. There is dissection. FIRST YEAR CLINICAL EXPOSURE: Drexel: Not a whole lot. You can go over to the hospital and there is a lot of helpful staff willing to teach you things, but this is really reserved for second year. ATSU: Not a whole lot, again. But, 3x each term, there are great opportunities to clinical experiences in clinics, medical examiner offices, fire department, surgery, community health centers, etc. Factors that are also less significant in my decision making process: Cost: ATSU is more expensive tuition-wise, but living in Philly will hike up the costs. Both are relatively similar. Class Size: Drexel ~80, ATSU ~70. Similar. Grading: Drexel 71.5%, ATSU 70%. Trust me, I am not trying to just slip by and get the minimum grade possible during PA school. I take a lot of pride in my work, but do not gauge my eyes out when I don’t get 100%. I also understand that the PANCE is based on all of this info I’m learning during that didactic year, so I need to thoroughly know and retain the information. Regardless, there isn’t much difference between the two. PANCE: I hate that everyone emphasizes this so much. I’m going to pass the PANCE wherever I go. They’re both right around the national average. I’ll be okay. Length: Drexel 27, ATSU 26 Simulations: Both have great, new, state-of-the-art simulation labs. Electives: I’m not basing this choice on this. SPECIFIC CONCERNS: Drexel: I’ve heard and read that their attrition rates are super high. That the class will start out with 80 students and lose 15 due to failing anatomy. Or those students have the choice of waiting a year to retake anatomy and end up on a 3-year track. I know I cannot make my decision based on the anticipation of failing anatomy, but it caught my attention. ATSU: Probation. I know it’s no longer on probation, but I don’t want a future employer to say, “Oh you’re from ATSU, isn’t that the program that was put on probation?” I’ve read two things. One, the program was on probation because students were missing out on required rotations. Two, the program was on probation because the PANCE scores dropped to 81% in 2011. I know it’s fixed now and that at the end of the day, I’m going to pass the PANCE, since scores since then have been 94%+ (last year 96%). I would say from the gut feeling I got at the interview, my choice is ATSU. But I feel like I really really cannot pass up the opportunity at Drexel. Don’t get me wrong, I really like their program as well. Everything I’ve read says, “it doesn’t matter where you go, go where you feel best suits you, it won’t matter.” But when we really get down to it, I do believe that it does matter. It will influence who I meet in my future and future opportunities. If anyone has additional questions for me, please let me know. Also, please correct me if any of what I’ve written is incorrect! Sorry for the long post, but this is a huge decision for me here! I greatly appreciate your time and effort in reading and responding to this. Thank you!
  8. I have been accepted to Campbell University and the University of Florida. I am having a difficult time deciding on which school to attend. Any advice on which and how to pick?
  9. Hello, I am new to this forum and would love to get involved. I'm sure that this topic has been thoroughly beat to absolute death, but for the sake of argument and for my own curiosity, I'd love to get some fresh opinions. I have read about as much literature on Physician Assistant vs. Physician and have been seriously questioning which is right for me as of late. ALthough I believe I exhibit a great deal of the qualities that would make a successful PA (love of medicine, teamwork, not needing to be 100% in charge) I believe that some of these also transfer over to being a physician. Though it may sometimes seem like it from outside, all of the physicians and PAs are essentially working together as a cohesive unit and building off of each other for the greater good of the patient. Now that I've gone off on that rant, for anyone who is still with me, I would like to know. What made you decide PA vs doctor? Originally my reasons were most concisely summarized as follows: - I would like to have a family and start my life before the age of 30 (though this is not a huge issue since I am a male and would not have to worry about a maternity leave and the like [sorry ladies]) - I care less about the title and more about medicine and helping patients - I would not mind working under a physician (as far as I know) - I could live comfortable working as a PA Recently, I have been sincerely considering and leaning more towards pursuing and MD or a DO. I feel that if I really do feel the way I do about medicine, why not take the extra time and really make it worth the time? I know this was kind of all over the place, but so is my mind at this time of weighing options. So I would love to hear any kind of feedback or opinions from anyone who has a legitimate opinion to state!
  10. desdes

    planned classes

    Since I will be moving soon I am in the process of applying to universities to take additional classes my question is for the app for caspa do I list the two schools I am considering and classes I plan to take.
  11. In a nutshell, high-ranking school #1 is far away (across the country) from my family and my boyfriend of three years, but when I visited it I loved it there and felt like the students were truly happy and getting a quality education. This school trains PAs for work in any field. Lower-ranking school #2 is close to my beautiful apartment I share with my boyfriend, as well as to my supportive and awesome family. Unfortunately, I kind of got a negative vibe when I visited--students there didn't love the program, and it seemed disorganized and unprioritized compared to the DO program (example: the director said the PA students "get to observe" the cadaver lab of the DO students for eight hours TOTAL over the course of two semesters). This school also aims to train primary care PAs, and I don't know for sure if primary care is what I want to do. (If I had to pick right now, I'd say emergency medicine, but who knows?) The schools COST THE SAME amount of money and have very similar test pass rates (both 95%+). Also, take into consideration that I definitely want to get a job after schooling near family/boyfriend! SO....1) Where should I go and why? 2) How important is it to have clinical rotations where I plan to live and work long-term? 3) What happens if you go to a primary care-focus school but decide you don't want to do primary care? Will my options be limited? Thanks infinitely for your help. I have to make this decision by February 27th! It's the hardest decision I can ever remember making...
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