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  1. Hello so first off, I'm a senior in high school interested in the health field, and looking mainly at the physician assistant profession. Currently, I don't seem to have the drive to go through 4 years of med school + and many more years of residency. I would also hate to pay off all the debt as well. I want to finish school early, less debt, start a family, and then possibly start a business. However, I heard that PA's have a hard time starting their own clinic and they must have a MD with them all times, is that true? The main reason to start my own clinic is because I want to be a little more independent from a MD, and I like business also. Which states allow me to practice independently? I'm from New York. Now how will I make money? Will I have to pay the doctor more money than me, if my business becomes successful?
  2. I'm attending Arizona State University online. I live in Georgia and I'm 24 years old. ASU is a quarter-based system, which means I get college credits on a quarterly basis instead of a semester basis. All PA and AA schools (I'm interested in both) require a certain amount of prerequisite hours, but at ASU, I would be about an hour or two short in a lot of them, like biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, etc. So, me getting a degree in biology from ASU is kind of pointless, because I'd have to take some additional prerequisite classes at my local college anyways. I should also mention I have a job (in aviation) that pays pretty well - about $60,000 a year. I am also in the process of getting my Surgical Technician certifications, but this will take a year or so. With this being said, I have two options: A: Get my Surgical Tech school done and take a really low course load at ASU for Biology to ensure I maintain as close to a 4.0 as possible. Get about 60 of 120 credits from ASU (amount needed to transfer), then transfer to the University of Georgia. Finish my degree in biology, but live off loans. Try to find a part-time CST job while in Athens to keep them as low as possible. Continue with a low class load to keep a good GPA. This way, I'm keeping my grades high, but still getting some crucial clinical experience. Eventually graduate from UGA, a highly respected school in Georgia, with a degree in Biology. Then apply to programs. Most will be far away, so if I get accepted into one of those, I'll also probably have to live off loans for the two years of AA or PA school. Lots of debt, but better undergrad, experience (in life and classwork), and higher caliber school. B: Buy a mobile home for a great price ($13k practically brand new) - a home right next to my parent's. In 3 years, it'll be paid off and cost me half as much as renting. Continue my degree at Arizona State University (online) in something like psychology, since my prerequisites won't count the same anyways. Minor in personal health. Get my Surgical Tech school done and work part-time while attending ASU. Finish my psychology degree, then take the right prerequisites at my local college. Don't live off any student loans until I get accepted into AA or PA school. Option A seems nice. I can go to UGA, graduate with a degree in Biology, have that prestigious college (at least for my state) attached to my degree, finish everything on a physical campus, have easier access to volunteering in research studies at the campus, have 100% of my focus on my school and GPA (this is important as grades don't come naturally to me), and pretty much devote my life to making sure my prerequisites and overall GPA are top notch. The bad - I'd live off loans and accumulate a lot more debt and UGA is harder (could be a good thing for preparation) in their expectations. A lot of good, but the two bad are related to more debt and harder to get a good GPA. Option B seems good too, but not as appealing. I'll undergrad in psychology and minor in personal health (biology/chem/etc not available). Take all the right prerequisites at a local college that should be easier to pass versus UGA's standards. Save money by working as a Surgical Tech and paying $500/mo in a mortgage payment versus $1,000/mo for an apartment. SORRY TO RAMBLE. What's your opinion?
  3. I’m currently attending a quarterly-based credit college and get 3 credits in some of my crucial prerequisite classes. All the pre-pa programs I’ve looked at say something along the lines of “Organic Chemistry - 3 semester hours or 4 quarter hours” but my college only gives 3 quarter hours for a class like this. I have no idea what I’m supposed to do. If my college gives 3 hours when I need 4, how do I get that additional hour? So confused!
  4. Although I’m not a PA yet, I hope posting in this forum is fine, as I’m seeking info on existing surgical PA’s. So, what’s your specialty? I’m very interested in surgery, but I also would like to have a decent lifestyle outside of work. I’d also prefer to do more lower-risk surgeries versus something like trauma patients. The only PA I know personally specializes in urology. She works a normal schedule, is married, and has a child. I love the aspect of surgery, the idea of savings lives, and even working weekends when they need me - I hope I don’t give off the vibe that I don’t want to work. Any PA’s out there in surgery that care to comment on your work-life balance? Any insight is very appreciated!
  5. I know this seems like such an easy question to answer, but I can’t seem to find it. I know a lot of PA’s say they make around $100k a year, but is that without bonuses? Do PA’s get paid time and a half for OT hours or are they just on a flat salary whether they work 40 hours or 60? I’m interested in becoming a surgical PA, which I’m sure comes with some more offered (sometimes mandatory) hours than someone in something like family care. I’m completely fine with this, just curious as to how the pay would differentiate. With that being said, do you get paid more when working over 40, or is it a flat salary?
  6. Hi, everyone. I’m going to attempt becoming a PA and need some advice. I have a good idea on what I’ll be doing to attempt getting into programs, so I’ll go ahead and give you my estimated credentials when applying to a program, sometime in the next 4 years. Bachelor of Science in Psychology with a minor in Health Sciences from Arizona State University. 3.6 GPA Standard GRE scores (haven’t taken any yet, but to play it safe, I’ll just say I’ve hypothetically scored average or slightly above average) Surgical Technician degree from a local technical college with ~ 2,000 hours clinical experience with ~ 500 hours of volunteer hospital-related work. Seeking to become a Surgical Physician Assistant. My main concern is that I’ll be attending ASU Online. I live in Georgia, so I’m sure the topic will be brought up and if I moved here, took online classes, etc. I’m completely content with online classes and don’t think they’ll harm my chances. I’ve inquired to PA programs near me, and they have all said they accept online programs like I’m pursuing, but that doesn’t let me know if someone would be deemed more competitive if they had similar credentials as me but in a physical campus. For my labs (required for PA program acceptance), I will actually have to fly out of state and attend those in person in an accelerated fashion specifically designed for out of state online students, so I’m still getting that physical lab presence, and it’s from a highly respected university. With all that being said, I currently have a job in aviation with a Fortune 500 company - I know, totally different world. My point is that I make really good money for my age. I’m 24 and made a little over $60,000 last year, which is very good in Georgia. So I don’t want to leave my current job to pursue school in a more traditional sense. I’m actually attending two colleges simultaneously - the local tech college for my Surgical Technician degree and ASU. I’ve just started on my ST program, which will take about 18 months. In this time, I can continue to go to ASU Online, work towards my bachelor’s, and save up as much money as possible from my job. After I complete the ST program, I’ll leave my current job to gain some clinical experience. I’ll have about 2-3 years left for me to finish my bachelors, which will give me plenty of time to rack up those required clinical hours. Sorry to rant, but I just wanted to get everything out there in a single post. Do you guys think I’m on the right track? How do you feel about me getting an online degree from ASU while simultaneously working for clinical experience? Does getting a degree part-time look less competitive than someone who’s going to college full time? How do you feel about my credentials? Answers to any questions are highly appreciated! Thanks again.
  7. To keep a long story short - I am 24 years old and attending South University in Savannah, GA for Psychology. I originally wanted to do something along the lines of neurology, psychiatry, or pathology. Ultimately, I have gained an extreme interest in becoming a PA. My main concerns are my chances of acceptance into a PA program - specifically the program provided at South University in Savannah, GA. I do not have any experience in the medical field. I've worked at Gulfstream Aerospace (a very good job/position) in Savannah for almost 3 years. I make about $60,000 per year in my current position, so it would be hard for me to leave to become something like an EMT to gain experience in a field and still having the possibility of not even being accepted into the program. By the time I finish my undergrad, my resume when applying to the PA program will look something along the lines of: 3.4 GPA, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (yes, I know it's not science, but I will take all the prerequisites), with no real-life experience. Also, I will be 27 years old, which seems a tad old. What are the chances of me being accepted with a decent GPA, bachelors in Psych, and no experience?
  8. I’m graduating high school soon, and I am really interested in the health field. I always like helping people and I’m leaning towards PA over MD,Nurse Practioner, Physical Therapist, or a Optometrist. I would love to get to work with patients fast and be done with schooling fast also. The amount of schooling required to become a doctor doesn’t attract me. I want to start a family early and get a job early also. I also want to spend more time with my family. PA’s make a good amount of money to live a comfortable life. Is it financially secure? Will being a PA fulfill me? Or should I just go the MD route? I’m not a big fan of more schooling, too much responsibility and stress. Do PA’s do same thing as doctors ,work even longer hours than doctors and get paid less?
  9. Hello friends, I am new to the group. I am a foreign medical graduate and a greencard holder. I studied medicine for 5.5 years. I am going to apply for Anesthesiology residency, which is very competitive. I am thinking to work as an Anesthesiology Assistant or Physician associate in Anesthesiology. My questions are: 1. What are the differences between these two positions in Anesthesiology? 2. Can I take National Commission for Certification of Anesthesiologist Assistants examination (NCCAA) ? Any suggestions are welcome... Thank you
  10. Hey! I am applying to PA school this cycle, but I have not had much luck with finding PAs to shadow in Montgomery county/the Philadelphia region. If anyone can help me out, please let me know! I've tried contacting multiple practices, but have not heard back.
  11. I have been a vet assistant/tech for about 2 years (currently not anymore) and as of the last 9 months I have been volunteering with a hospital ED for human experience. I know of one school who accepts this, east Michigan, but I live in the southeast and would like to stay closer to home. Does anybody have any schools that also accept this or any comments on if I should include this in my HCE? Has anyone else gotten into a program with similar experience or know of anybody? Thank you.
  12. Many of my classmates tell me the PAEA EOR exams are challenging and the study blue print provided is useless. We are just starting our clinical year and nobody as really figured out how to do do well...people pass, but I want to do well. Any tips on how to prepare for the PAEA EOR exams?
  13. Hi everyone! I'm graduating this May with a B.S. in Nutrition/Dietetics, and heading down to Virginia soon after to be with my significant other. I have been perusing the job boards in the area that I'm moving to get an idea of what medical assistant jobs are posted and what the typical qualifications are. Anyways, I see that in Virginia, as opposed to Pennsylvania where I live now, most medical assistant job postings require the medical assistant certificate. I was kind of hoping that I can get an MA position to finally accumulate HCE. I have my EMT-B certification, but have never ran for the company I'm affiliated with (got it out of state and I am still waiting on my instate certification...). Do you think it's pointless to apply for these MA jobs, or will my current certification be useful? Prior to me receiving my EMT-B certification, I had plans to transfer my certification to VA and work in an ED or for a station; however, seeing as it has taken 5 months already to transfer my certificate from one state to another, I decided to not do that (should have traveled and taken the in state class, huh). My goal was to apply this coming summer, but it looks like I might have to postpone my application for another year. Any advice/insight?
  14. Hey all, I'm pre-PA at UW-Madison, and am one of those people how gets so much peace of mind knowing exactly what I want to do in the future. I've been trying to find the perfect specialty for myself according to some criteria and I'm wondering if anyone could point me in the right direction as to which specialty would suit me best: -interesting field, with lots of variety, and intellectually challenging -good hours (maybe 8-5, somewhere around that general area, not a crazy amount of call, etc.) -very good salary+benefits -hands on but also requires just as much thinking and decision making (using pharmacology, physiology, etc.) -most importantly would allow me to be able to love what I do, as well as to be the best possible father/husband I hope to be. I've looked a lot into CT/CV, and general surgery, ER medicine, and ortho, and all of those interest me a lot, it just seems like they wouldn't be so "family-friendly" as a career. Thoughts? Any advice is MUCH appreciated, thanks so much
  15. Hey! I was recently accepted to the Winthrop PA program. I'm coming from relatively far away so I'm going to start looking for apartments in the Long Island area in towns nearby Mineola (between Mineola and Bay Shore). I don't know if anyone else is looking for a roommate but if so, message me if you'd like! I checked if there was an accepted students Facebook group for this kind of thing but I haven't seen it yet. Hopefully it gets posted soon. Can't wait to meet everyone!
  16. Hey guys, I would really appreciate any thoughts and/or critiques about the flow and overall theme of my statement. Is there anything missing or not well expalined? The door flew open and slammed against the adjacent wall. I entered a darkened room where I could only make out the outlines of other patients and hear the noise of chatter and children crying. As my eyes adjusted to the sharp contrast from the glaring sun outside, I slowly made my way to the counter. “Sign in,” said a voice and I looked down to see a chewed-up pin and a pile of torn paper. I wrote my name and date of birth and handed it to the clerk, who pointed out seats against a wall nearby. "Have a seat; we’ll call you when we’re ready.” I took a seat alongside a crowd of young women and children and patiently waited my turn to be seen at my local health department. As a teenager without health insurance, I spent many years “in the system,” seeing first-hand the demand for affordable primary care. My experiences at the local health department made me dread going, never knowing if I would ever see the same provider again. Like many others in my situation, I eventually stopped going. After these experiences, I decided to make a career in healthcare, where I hope to be part of the solution of providing stability for the underprivileged and financially burdened. I began my journey as a pharmacy technician, a job that solidified my interests in the science of medicine and furthered my awareness of the huge role of primary care providers in the health system. This perspective grew substantially when I began working in registration at the emergency department of my local hospital. Just as I had at the health department years earlier, patients without options sat for hours to be seen for fevers and headaches. My observations pushed me to continue with a career in medicine. After graduating from college, I moved home to pursue my career, climbing from being a unit secretary to becoming a patient care technician. There I got my first hands-on experiences with patients. One morning as I was assisting a patient to the bathroom, she began sweating and complaining of blurred vision. I immediately called for someone to come in so we could check her blood sugar levels; it was 37 mg/dL. With the nurse at my side, we got the patient back to bed and gave IV glucose. It was a rite of passage for me; I was happy to have recognized symptoms and then reacted appropriately without hesitation. Moments like this led me to see that I wanted to not only treat patients but learn to diagnose as well. Many of us have mentors who helped guide us in our journeys. After nearly nine years in healthcare, I began working with Mike, a physician assistant on the cardiothoracic surgery unit. I watched him take the extra time with patients to go over each medication, not only to ensure there were no drug interactions but also to explain the purpose of each. When his patients need refills, instead of asking for “the little blue pill,” they can confidently ask for their blood pressure medication. I saw first-hand how understanding a patient’s problems and taking the time to address them can greatly reduce complications and improve the quality of life for those in our communities. PAs play an important role in this mission and they do so as part of a team. A team-based care system is very important to me. I learned the value of a solid support network while struggling after the death of my cousin. The pain of losing my best friend had a profound effect on me and my grade suffered. The personal disappointment I felt after failing two semesters made it difficult for me to continue on my career path. However, with the backing of my friends and family, I was able to push forward and overcome these trials. I was taught stress-management and determination through these hardships and they will aid me as I endeavor this challenging and evolving career as a PA. With my professional training in the medical field, I have a good understanding and appreciate everyone’s roles in healthcare. We come from several backgrounds and experiences that allow us to integrate together and ultimately provide better patient care. I am confident in my ability to translate my skills into my studies as well as future practice and become a successful PA. I am also confident in my ability to relate and help close the gap in available healthcare as a primary care provider. Thanks in advance!
  17. I hope this is it! I am now below the character limit and I feel that I have included everything I wanted to portray, I just need some grammar nazis to find my mistakes!!! Thanks for any help :) **PS- if there's something you think needs more clarification or rewording, please tell me** As a teenager without health insurance, I spent many years ignoring symptoms or making do with remedies I already had at home. My go-to was some leftover menthol cough drops in my tea to help open my sinuses and soothe my throat. Thankfully, I was generally healthy and could manage by going to the health department once a year. I understand why someone would rather ignore his or her symptoms than see a doctor. I dreaded going to the health department because I never knew if I would see the same provider. Many see preventative care as a luxury, and overlook how it could save their heart, foot, or even life. Some feel like they do not connect with their provider or cannot understand them. Sometimes, it comes down to what is more important right now: eating today or diabetes tomorrow. These observations led me to pursue healthcare, where I hope to provide stability for the underprivileged and financially burdened. Spending ten years in healthcare has allowed me to interact with a variety of providers. With this exposure, I have realized that it is to a physician assistant (PA) that I relate. PAs help close the gap of disparities within healthcare by providing an affordable means for treatment. Also, through its supportive nature, the physician-PA team uses the skills of each provider to improve patient care and experiences. Additionally, the well-rounded training that PAs obtain allows them to adapt to the needs of their community and even carry their skills globally. All these reasons are important to me, having seen many of these issues firsthand. After high school, I became a pharmacy technician. This position solidified my interests in medicine and helped me appreciate the impact of patient education. I remember patients requesting refills for medications they could neither name nor state their use. Once, an elderly man came in with a baggie full of empty pill bottles, the labels almost illegible. Upon further inspection, we noticed that he had redundant medications and a variety of providers. We sat down with him, consolidated his medications, and then explained to him the importance of seeing a single provider. This was a common occurrence in the pharmacy, and I always made a point to educate these individuals. I wanted more contact with patients and later began working in registration at an emergency room. I saw those without insurance sit hours to be seen for fevers and headaches. Coming from this environment as a teenager, I understood that this was the primary care experience for many. Also recognizing this, one PA in the ER paid extra attention to these patients. I watched him go over each medication not only to rule out drug interactions, but also to explain their uses. When his patients returned, instead of asking for "the little blue pill," they confidently asked for their blood pressure medication. I admire his respect for patients, and it inspired me to also advocate for them. Once, I noticed a patient was anxious over the cost of a medication they had just been prescribed and coordinated with his provider to supply him with samples and coupons. Later, I became a patient care technician on the cardiothoracic surgery unit. This position gave me the chance to more closely see the connection between patients and their caregivers. One morning as I was assisting a patient to the bathroom, she began sweating and complaining of blurred vision. Alarmed, I checked her blood sugar; it was 37 mg/dL. With the nurse at my side, we helped the patient to bed and gave IV glucose. I am happy to have quickly recognized these symptoms and reacted. Moments like this showed me that I want to not only treat patients, but also diagnose. Becoming a PA will be difficult, but I am confident in my time- and stress-management skills. I have held many jobs while attending university full-time. I recall getting off work, eating in the car on the way to class, and coming home to study all night. This continued throughout my college career and although it was tough balancing several obligations simultaneously, I was always proud to have successfully completed each semester. I have always known that the best tool for succeeding under stress is a strong support network. This was tested during my sophomore year when I lost my cousin to non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Never dealing with death before, I was unable to cope with losing my best friend; eventually, I failed two semesters. Reflecting upon this hardship, I drew from the support of my family and friends to push forward. I succeeded in retaking these semesters and continued to excel in my studies thereafter. My experiences at the pharmacy, reception desk, and on the unit have helped me value what people contribute to a team. Our backgrounds and various skills allow us to provide better care through integration and empathy. Since my days at the health clinic, I have seen the needs of the underprivileged, and becoming a PA is my next step as a patient educator, supporter, and advocate. Thanks everyone!
  18. Hi, I'm a first time applicant and I really don't have anyone to read my statement so I'm reaching out to you for help. I'm over my character limit my 809 and I can't find where to cut. I'm also not sure if I'm going the right direction with this statement. I appreciate any comments!! As a teenager without health insurance, I spent many years ignoring symptoms or eking by with whatever remedies I already had at home. Sure, when these methods did not work, I was forced to see a doctor, however, this was rarely the case. Thankfully, I was generally healthy and could manage only going to my health department once a year. Unfortunately, this is not the circumstance for many, and chronic illnesses go undiagnosed and uncontrolled. I can understand why someone would rather ignore their symptoms than see a doctor. I dreaded going to the health department because I never knew if I would ever see the same provider again. Many just do not recognize the importance of preventive care and how it could save their heart, foot, or even life. Some just feel like they do not connect with their provider or just cannot understand them. Sometimes, it comes down to what is more important right now: eating today or diabetes tomorrow. These observations led me to pursue healthcare, where I hope to be part of the solution of providing stability for the underprivileged, underrepresented, and financially burdened. Having spent nearly ten years in healthcare, I have interacted with a variety of providers, but it is to a physician assistant (PA) that I relate. PAs help close the gap of disparities within healthcare by providing an affordable means to primary care. Also, with the supportive nature of a PA in the physician-PA team, they are available to allow for more time with each patient. This is important not only in forming a lasting relationship with patients, but also in giving them the knowledge to make healthy decisions. In addition, the generalist training that PAs obtain make them more flexible to adapt to the needs of their community and even carry their skills globally. All of these reasons are significant to me, having seen many of these issues firsthand. Upon graduating from high school, I became a pharmacy technician. This position solidified my interests in the science of medicine and furthered my awareness of the huge role of primary care providers in the health system. I remember, on several occasions, patients coming in and requesting a refill for a medication that they not only could not name but had no idea why it was prescribed. Others, having seen so many different providers, had redundant medications or even drug interactions. After several years at the pharmacy, I knew I wanted to be more involved with patients and began working in registration at the emergency department of my local hospital. I witnessed patients without options sit for hours to be seen for fevers and headaches, just as I had years earlier. For many, this was their primary care experience. One PA there recognized this and provided them extra attention. I watched him take the time to go over each medication these patients were taking, not only to ensure there were no drug interactions but also to explain the purpose of each. When his patients need refills, instead of asking for “the little blue pill,” they can confidently ask for their blood pressure medication. My perspective grew substantially due to this; I wanted to be a patient advocate. I moved home after college to further my career in medicine. Rising from a unit secretary to becoming a patient care technician, I got my first hands-on experiences with patients. This position showed me how rewarding patient care is, even if it can be messy and often thankless. One morning as I was assisting a patient to the bathroom, she began sweating and complaining of blurred vision. I immediately called for someone to come in so we could check her blood sugar levels; it was 37 mg/dL. With the nurse at my side, we got the patient back to bed and gave IV glucose. I am happy to have recognized these symptoms and react appropriately without hesitation. Moments like this led me to see that I want to not only treat patients but learn to diagnose as well. I know the path to becoming a PA will be difficult. A PA program is not only a science-intensive graduate-level platform, but it is in an accelerated format that involves a great deal of dedication and determination. As someone who has held two, sometimes three, jobs while attending university full-time, I am confident in my skills obtained in time- and stress-management. I recall, on several occasions, getting off work, eating in the car on the way to class, coming home to study all night, then doing it all again the next day. The ability to balance multiple obligations while still finding time for yourself takes practice, but is important for mental and physical health as well as success in such a rigorous program. For me, the most significant tool in succeeding under such stress is a strong support network. During my sophomore year in undergrad, I lost my older cousin. Never having dealt with death before, I was unable to cope with losing my best friend; eventually, I failed two semesters. Reflecting upon this irresponsibility, I was able to use the trust and support of my family and friends to overcome this hardship and push forward. These abilities, however, will help me succeed in this challenging new academic path. My professional experiences in several healthcare fields has given me a unique perspective of the process involved in patient care, from the moment they come in to after they leave. This has made me cognizant and appreciative of everyone’s role in said process. We come from several backgrounds and experiences that allow us to integrate together and ultimately provide better patient care. I am certain in my ability to translate my skills into my studies as well as future practice and become a successful PA. I am also confident that I can relate and help close the gap in available healthcare as a primary care provider.
  19. You guessed it! I am a first time applicant and you guys are the only ones that can help me with critiquing my personal statement. Im actually pretty surprised I stayed under the character limit for my rough draft. Please look it over and tell me how bad it stinks! The door flew open and slammed against the adjacent wall. The room was dark and all I could make out were figures and the noise of chatter and children crying. As my eyes adjusted to the sharp contrast in darkness from the blaring sun outside, I made my way to the counter. “Sign in,” said a voice and I looked down to see a chewed up pin and a pile of ripped up pieces of paper, on which I wrote my name and date of birth. The voice came out again “have a seat; we’ll call you when we’re ready.” I turned to see a room, no bigger than a two bedroom apartment, full of young women and children of various ages. I took a seat and waited for my turn to be seen at my local health department. As an adolescent without health insurance, I have seen first-hand the demand for providers that can offer available healthcare. My experiences at the local health department made me dread going, never knowing if I would see the same provider again. Like many others in my situation, I just stopped going. After these experiences, I knew I wanted to be the stability for the underprivileged and financially burdened. I began my role in healthcare as a pharmacy technician. It was this job that solidified my interests in the science of medicine. It was also this exposure which showed me that primary care providers play a huge role in the health system. However, it was not until I began working in registration for the Emergency Department of my local hospital that I could see just how important this role is; patients sitting for hours to be seen for a fever and headache because they do not have any other option for healthcare. These observations pushed me to continue in medicine. After moving home to pursue this career, I climbed my way from a unit secretary to a patient care technician where I had my first hands-on experiences with patients. I remember a particular incident where while I was assisting a patient to the bathroom, she began sweating and complaining of blurred vision. I immediately called for someone to come in so I could check her blood sugar levels; it was 37 mg/Dl. With the nurse by my side, we got Ms. Kay safely to the bed and began treating her with intravenous glucose. I was so excited and proud of myself for recognizing the symptoms and being able to react without hesitation. It is moments like this one that I recognize my desires are not only to treat patients, but also diagnose illnesses. After working closely with many health providers for nearly ten years, none stood out to me like Mike, a physician assistant on the cardiothoracic surgery unit. I have seen him take the extra time to go over every medication a patient had not only to ensure there was no drug interactions but to explain and write down the uses of each for when they returned home. When this patient needs a refill, instead of asking for “the little blue pill,” they will confidently ask for their blood pressure medication. Understanding these problems and taking the time to address them through patient education and support can greatly improve the quality of life for those in our communities. PAs help to carry out this idea of preventive medicine over episodic care as a team. A team-based care system is very important to me. I learned the value of a solid support network while struggling after the death of my cousin. The pain of losing my best friend, and the personal disappointment I felt after failing two semesters, made it difficult for me to continue on my career path confidently. However, with the backing and trust of my peers, much like a PA in their practice, I was able to push forward and overcome these trials. I was taught stress-management and determination through these hardships and they will aid me as I endeavor this challenging and evolving career as a PA. With my professional training in the medical field, I have a good understanding and appreciate everyone’s roles in healthcare. We come from several backgrounds and experiences that allow us to integrate together and ultimately provide better patient care. I am confident in my ability to translate my skills into my studies as well as future practice and become a successful PA. I am also confident in my ability to relate and help close the gap in available healthcare as a primary care provider.
  20. what are my chances for getting accepted to PA school after graduation?
  21. I am writing in regards to my wife and her interest in getting into a PA program. She is very smart, she has an undergraduate degree in Psychology with a 3.88 gpa and a 4.0 gpa in all required PA program science courses (Chemistry, Biology, etc.). She also made those grades while working part-time and playing soccer full-time for her University. By the time she applies for the PA program (at Bridgeport University) she will have around 2500 hours of direct patient care as a home health aid (I know that is not the most noteworthy), around 100 hours as a neurofeedback technician, and around 100 hours interning with a Pediatrician (with quite a bit of hands on experience). I would really appreciate some honest feedback. Where do you think she will stand in the application process?
  22. Hello, I am new to this forum and would love to get involved. I'm sure that this topic has been thoroughly beat to absolute death, but for the sake of argument and for my own curiosity, I'd love to get some fresh opinions. I have read about as much literature on Physician Assistant vs. Physician and have been seriously questioning which is right for me as of late. ALthough I believe I exhibit a great deal of the qualities that would make a successful PA (love of medicine, teamwork, not needing to be 100% in charge) I believe that some of these also transfer over to being a physician. Though it may sometimes seem like it from outside, all of the physicians and PAs are essentially working together as a cohesive unit and building off of each other for the greater good of the patient. Now that I've gone off on that rant, for anyone who is still with me, I would like to know. What made you decide PA vs doctor? Originally my reasons were most concisely summarized as follows: - I would like to have a family and start my life before the age of 30 (though this is not a huge issue since I am a male and would not have to worry about a maternity leave and the like [sorry ladies]) - I care less about the title and more about medicine and helping patients - I would not mind working under a physician (as far as I know) - I could live comfortable working as a PA Recently, I have been sincerely considering and leaning more towards pursuing and MD or a DO. I feel that if I really do feel the way I do about medicine, why not take the extra time and really make it worth the time? I know this was kind of all over the place, but so is my mind at this time of weighing options. So I would love to hear any kind of feedback or opinions from anyone who has a legitimate opinion to state!
  23. Just what the topic asks. Does anybody know if there are any PA schools in particular that focus on, say, the last two years of your undergrad as opposed to looking at your cumulative GPA? I know many med schools do this, because it seems to be a general rule that most students don't do so hot in their first years. Also, I notice that a lot of schools want around a 3.0 GPA when applying. I'm a Canadian student so I was wondering what the GPA conversion would be. Over here in Canada on a 4.0 scale, a 70-72% is considered a B- and is weighed as a 2.7. So if someone had a GPA around that (a B-), what are their chances to get into an American PA school? Thanks guys!
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