Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'acceptance'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Professional Physician Assistant
    • Professional PA General Discussion
    • Medical Billing & Coding
    • Specialties
    • Military
    • State Specific Discussion
    • Physician Assistant Residency
    • Physician Assistant Owned Practice
    • Contracts, Negotiations & Malpractice
  • International Physician Assistant Forum
    • International Physician Assistant
    • International Physician Assistant Schools
  • Physician Assistant Student Forums
  • Pre-PA

Categories

  • PA Profession
  • Medical
  • PANCE/PANRE Review
  • Pre-PA
  • Other

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Profession

Found 42 results

  1. Hi everyone, I really really want to be a physician assistant, but I don't have the most outstanding test scores or grades. I was wondering if you all could give me your opinion on if I have any chance at all of getting into a PA program. My overall GPA was a 3.30 and my science GPA was a 3.27. I took the GRE and got a 155 on verbal, but only a 145 on the quantitative section, and a 4.0 on the writing section. I will have 1,720 hours of healthcare experience working as a CNA by the time I am planning to apply to physician assistant programs. I also have 24 hours of shadowing PAs as experience. Please let me know if you think I have any chance of being accepted into a PA program. Also, if any of you have any recommendations on PA programs that would be best for me to apply to based on my stats I would greatly appreciate that! Thanks in advance for any and all responses!
  2. So this is my second cycle applying and I’m currently on the waitlist at 3 schools (one waitlist I’m pretty deep in). Two of those schools are great programs I love when I interviewed. My only acceptance is to this program that I didn’t care for when I interviewed at it. It’s also located in a state with very extreme political laws in healthcare and I don’t think I would want to stay in that place to practice. Should I decline my acceptance and reapply next year to only my top schools?
  3. I am a Biology/Pre-PA major Junior in college. I am in ROTC and participate in many extracurricular within ROTC, so I am ranked well. I am looking for advice on my chances for getting into PA school. I don't have many preferences for a PA school, my life dream has just always been to save lives within the medical field. At the time of applying for PA school I will have a 3.1-3.3 GPA, around 1000 hours as an ED medical scribe, and I worked as a pharmacy technician for a year. Most of my credibility outside of my GPA is ROTC which takes up a decent chunk of time which I am hoping will say something for my application. I have yet to take the GRE but plan on doing well since I will need the extra buff. I also attended basic camp and advanced camp if that helps my application at all. What are my chances for getting into PA school and is there any advice that I can be given for my future success in the medical field. Thank you. Very Respectfully, Nick
  4. Hello! I feel blessed to be coming to you guys with such a problem, but it's been weighing on me and need advice from current PA-S's and PA-C's. I have been accepted to two schools: School A which is 20 minutes away from my current living space and School B which is closer to my parents, but still about an hour away. Schools A and B seem pretty comparable in terms of curriculum, program length (A: 27 mo versus B: 25 mo), PANCE pass rates (A: 97 versus B: 99), tuition (a difference of 3K), and employment rates after graduation. The main differences that I see are that school B is associated with a medical school, so networking opportunities and strength in name and that school B will end up costing almost 40K more due to cost of living expenses. School B was my top choice prior to interviewing but was not the first school to get back to me, therefore, I have not placed my deposit. School B is also where most of my college friends settled and has an opportunity for research, which is important to me. School A has cheaper living costs, and somewhat of a support system from my current workplace friends. l have seen two basic schools of thought for this quandary, which include: Go to the cheapest school, you'll thank yourself later. Go to the school that you will regret not going to if you choose otherwise. Do you agree with either of these or have your own idea based on your own experience? Any anecdotes proving either correct or other statements would be helpful. Thanks in advance!
  5. I'm applying to UF in a few weeks, and it's also time to register for summer/fall classes at UCF if I'm going to take them. I can either take Orgo 2 and lab this summer, followed by Biochem this fall, (which will only be listed on my CASPA as future classes) or I can work many more shifts at the hospital and also shadow more. My stats: - 33 year-old, male, second career applicant. Have a non-science master's degree. - Went back to school to take all pre-reqs at UCF. Got straight A's on required pre-req's, plus As in Genetics and Orgo 1 - BCP GPA 3.9 // Overall GPA 3.8 // GRE 328 (166 verbal, 162 math, 5.0 writing) - Dual-licensed EMT and CNA, working at major hospital as a flex pool nursing assistant, 2000+ hours (worked ICU, PCU, cardiac, med-surg, ortho, and psych). 40 hours shadowing in ortho OR. If I work more instead of taking Orgo2 and Biochem, I will have 4000+ hours and more shadowing - Fully bi-lingual (English and Spanish) with strong interview skills. When I compare to the recent class profiles, I see that my grades and GRE are strong, and PCE is average. But those profiles don't show what classes the students took. I expect most of them have undergrad science degrees with many more science classes, whereas I am paying cash to take my science classes piecemeal at UCF. So my question is, honestly, am I pretty likely to be accepted as is? Should I just work? If I take the extra classes, that would let me apply to NOVA and USF as back-ups, but I only want to go to UF. I know it's competitive, and I should be so lucky to get in anywhere. But there it is. So which is better for UF, more hours/shadowing, or take Orgo2 and Biochem after CASPA sent? Thank you!
  6. What is the lowest GPA acceptance have you gotten or heard of? Has anyone (or yourself) you know gotten in with a GPA lower than 3.0? If so, what stood them (or you) out than others?
  7. Hello Everyone! I currently live in Southern California but have been lucky enough to be accepted to a couple schools in NY. I am also currently waiting to hear back from a few California schools. I was wondering how important it is in terms of obtaining a job after PA School to attend a school that is located in the state that you wish to practice.
  8. Is there a general chart displaying the acceptance rate of all accredited PA schools? It's well known that getting into PA school is competitive, so I would be surprised if there wasn't such a chart, as it would be very useful in considering programs.
  9. Hi, I applied to SCUHS. I received an email from them after CASPA verified my application saying that interview notification will be sent out in January and interviews in February. Today is January 26th 2018 and I have heard nothing. Anyone heard from them?
  10. To keep a long story short - I am 24 years old and attending South University in Savannah, GA for Psychology. I originally wanted to do something along the lines of neurology, psychiatry, or pathology. Ultimately, I have gained an extreme interest in becoming a PA. My main concerns are my chances of acceptance into a PA program - specifically the program provided at South University in Savannah, GA. I do not have any experience in the medical field. I've worked at Gulfstream Aerospace (a very good job/position) in Savannah for almost 3 years. I make about $60,000 per year in my current position, so it would be hard for me to leave to become something like an EMT to gain experience in a field and still having the possibility of not even being accepted into the program. By the time I finish my undergrad, my resume when applying to the PA program will look something along the lines of: 3.4 GPA, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology (yes, I know it's not science, but I will take all the prerequisites), with no real-life experience. Also, I will be 27 years old, which seems a tad old. What are the chances of me being accepted with a decent GPA, bachelors in Psych, and no experience?
  11. Hey everyone! I wanted to start a thread to see where everyone is with the application and interview process for the 2017-2018 cycle. It appears as though this program is still on probation, has anyone heard any news? Thanks all <3
  12. Hey all, I'm having some trouble deciding between becoming an RN or becoming a PA. I know there are many differences between the two professions, but that only seems to make my decision harder. Recently I just got accepted into my schools nursing program, but I'm not sure if I want to go through with it. For a very long time now I have wanted to be a PA but pretty much ruled it out because I thought the path it took to get there would be too hard. I have never been a straight A student (A's and B's with a rare C), and I know GPA is a heavily weighted factor in even getting considered for a PA program, not to mention the work you have to do if you get accepted! I am a very tenacious person. I know getting to PA school would be a challenge, but with all that considered, PA school is always on my mind. I feel like the only reason I am currently going for nursing is because I'm scared I would not be able to get into PA school (and if I don't then I'm kind of stuck). If anyone has any advice I would love to hear it!
  13. Here is the continuation of the story..... Few days back, I had posted a topic about getting an interview from a school on probation. Well, I got accepted. This was the first time I was applying. I am feeling happy but lost. As I had previously mentioned, I did not apply to many colleges this cycle. Only 5, as I had 2 more pre-requisites to finish and have not taken my GRE. I got one rejection so far and one acceptance( from a school on probation) and yet to hear from the others(3 left). Before the probation issue, I really did like this school. It was close to home-2 hours away. I am married with family responsibilities; hence it seemed feasible to come back home on weekends and plus a lot of other factors that I found favorable at that time. On the interview day, they mentioned about the probation saying that they are doing everything they can to fix the problem. Some paperwork/document issue was the cause behind the probation and nothing related to education. Their first time pass rate( 5 years)-91% and total pass rate( 5 years)-96%. Here are my stats: Overall gpa - 3.8 Overall science gpa - 3.73 HCE- almost 4000 and still counting(working as MA) Lastly, I have to mention my age- 40 years old( which I find negative) I will surely pay my deposit but my question is- If I do not get any more interviews this cycle, should I take this opportunity or apply for next cycle to better programs? Am I killing the goose in my hand? This what I got from the ARC-PA website Report due for standards related to: the sponsoring institution addressing appropriate security and personal safety measures for PA students when instruction occurs at supervised clinical practice experience (SCPE) sites, student files including documentation that the student has met requirements for program completion, instructional objectives in didactic courses that guide student acquisition of required competencies, the program curriculum including instruction in human sexuality, SCPEs in preventive, emergent, acute and chronic patient encounters that enable students to meet program expectations and acquire the competencies needed for entry into clinical PA practice, SCPEs allowing students to meet program expectations and acquire competencies with patients seeking medical care across the life span, women’s health, care requiring surgical management, and care for behavioral and mental health conditions, SCPEs with preceptors practicing in pediatrics, implementing an ongoing self-assessment process that documents program effectiveness and fosters program improvement, applying the results of ongoing self-assessment to the curriculum and other dimensions of the program, a self-study report that documents results of critical analysis from ongoing self-assessment, faculty evaluation of the curricular and administrative aspects of the program, modifications that occurred as a result of self-assessment and self-identified program strengths and areas in need of improvement, maintaining and documenting effective processes for ongoing evaluation of sites and preceptors used for SCPEs to ensure that sites and preceptors meet program expectations for learning
  14. Hi everyone, I am a pre-PA school who recently had an interview at MCPHS Boston PA Program. When I visited there for my interview, they said the result will come out in 2 to 3 weeks, but they did not specify how they would let us know. Does anybody know if they email us or call us whether we got rejected or accepted? Also, should I contact the school if I do not hear back after 3 weeks? Thanks!
  15. Hello everyone! I am in need of some feedback on where I stand with my chances of acceptance as well as my current path and advice on where to go from here. I am 23 years old and a recent graduate (May 2017) from Texas Tech University and was on the Pre-PA route. I received a B.S. in Biology along with a minor in both health professions and spanish. I finished with an overall cumulative GPA of 3.20 and a science GPA (I think...kinda confused on how they calculate this) of a 2.73. I have my CNA license, shadowing hours in multiple states within the USA at different types of practices (private and public), and have international experience in the Surgical & Trauma unit at a public hospital in Santiago, Chile. I am fluent in both english and spanish. One of my major obstacles is my science GPA. A lot of the schools would like to see a lot higher GPA than what I have assumed mine is. I have a total of 160 credit hours. I am trying to decide if I should retake any classes I received a C in OR take new classes that are prereqs for some of the schools, such as abnormal/developmental psychology. What is yall's opinion on this? Another obstacle I am having is that I need clinical experience. I only have my CNA license, but I have been trying to get a job as a phlebotomist or medical assistant. I know both of those certification courses are too long and costly for me to take right now so that is why I am going for those jobs without certification. Any recommendations on how to approach this issue would be greatly appreciated! Overall, my deal with myself right now is that I am having doubts on my future chances of admission to PA school after spending all that time in undergraduate working towards that goal. I am stuck on what my next move or focus should be. Where do you all think I stand as of right now with my chances AND what do you all recommend my next move should be? Thank you for the help!! Jack **also attached is my resume Resume.docx
  16. Hi all, I just wanted to know if anyone has gotten into PA school, or are going to apply, that have not been the traditional Biology, Chemistry, Bio-Chem, etc. science majors? I am a Psychology major, but was previously a Biology major. I have finished all of the pre-reqs for most PA schools and some of the "recommended but not required" courses. I am just afraid that the committee will doubt my academic readiness to take on PA school. Does anyone have any experience in this? Thank you!
  17. Hello everyone! My name is Ben and I am looking to start a thread for everyone who was accepted to ODU for the class entering Aug 21, 2017. I received my acceptance email and letter towards the end of October and am hoping to connect with some of the students who have been accepted so far! Anybody accepted that is from Columbus? Any tips on looking for housing near campus?
  18. Hey Everyone! Long time lurker, first time poster. For the longest time, I was dead set on going to Rutgers/UMDNJ (since I did undergrad here), but applied to 9 other programs, just in case. As it turns out, I was accepted to Rutgers very early before hearing from any other schools. Since PCOM was my #2 school, I decided to go to the interview and loved it! Now that I have been accepted, I cannot decide which program to do. Both programs are relatively the same price with PCOM being a year shorter. I’ve seen posts like this before and I understand that it is an individual decision that I have to make myself, but I am hoping for any insight from any current students or practicing PAs about how much this all matters! Rutgers Pros: Good Reputation-Program since 1976 Good PA faculty that teach clinical classes High PANCE Pass (High 90's-always above average) 11 Rotations 9 required/2 elective ICU/Critical Care is a required rotation-what I am interested in Paid Deposit already 3 years-allows you to learn more material Cons: First semester is only a review of science prereqs-biochem, genetics, cell bio etc. Do not start anything clinically related until 2nd/3rd semesters. Facilities are older Completed Undergrad here-time for something new? No white coat ceremony-seems trivial, but it is something that I have always dreamed of... Prosected cadavers Approximately 1-2 people decelerate per semester due to variety of reasons (some academic) PCOM Pros: High PANCE pass rate (usually 95% or above) Brand new simulation lab See standardized patients weekly from the sart of the fall semester Faculty appeared responsive/welcoming during interview day Connected with Osteopathic med school Allows for use of DaVinci simulator Campus had a "welcoming" vibe 26 month program-done quicker Dissected cadavers-first summer is spent only doing anatomy/phys Cons: Less rotations ​8 rotations 7 required/1 elective No mandatory ICU rotation Not as strong reputation as Rutgers/UMDNJ PCOM-1998 Rutgers-1976 If anyone could give me any insight at all, I'd greatly appreciate it. I have about 2 weeks to decide whether to accept PCOM's offer or not.
  19. Hello everyone, I have recently decided to portray a degree in ESS that is designed to get (help) me into PA school. However, before I made this choice, I was pursuing a BS in Computer Science. To make a long story short, I failed my second CS course and my Calc 2 course because of personal and educational issues. These two courses are not required for PA school, but I'm worried if my grade in them will reflect on my acceptance into a PA school. I'm wondering if anyone has experience this? What do I need to do? How can proceed to becoming a PA?
  20. I've seen quite a few times that interviewers will question why you're choosing to become a PA rather than a Nurse Practitioner after working as a nurse full-time for several years. To me, I'll still be getting the hands on experience I need to be functional as a PA and will be more involved and in the know than I would if I worked as a CNA first, which seems to be a more accepted form of getting patient care experience for PA school. Do you think becoming a Nurse could affect my chances of being accepted to PA school? My argument would be that I prefer the more in depth diagnosis and treatment route paired with patient care of a PA, rather than the health education/awareness model of the DNP program. Thanks!
  21. Hello all, I have recently been accepted into a few different programs and I am trying to choose between two schools specifically. They are extremely different. One is the Unviersity of New England, a mid ranked school focused on primary care and rural medicine, emphasizing​ Interprofessional relationships. The other is the more "prestigious" George Washington University that offers a MPH in either epi, policy, or community health in addition. I have spoken to alumni of UNE and they have only positive things to say about the program. I feel that the GW program is very experienced and could possibly open up interesting opportunities later. However, how useful would an MPH degree be? Any alumni of a dual program out there, who could speak to how they used the dual degree in their professional life, whether practicing or doing work in public health? Between the schools, GW is at least $50,000 dollars more expensive and that is not including the MPH degree. Any respectful advice/thoughts would be appreciated.
  22. Hello all, I am 39 years old. I have been thinking about proceeding through two years of fulfilling requirements, and health care experience- to apply to all and any PA schools - preferably New York or Southern California, Northern California. Although i have worked in health and wellness fields for six years in New York, it was primarily management. I have an undergraduate degree in Painting, and a 3.8 gpa. once to teach at the college level, but did not pursue masters as turn in economy and job market. After many turns in the economy and changes to job market with the mass flood of technology, I am originally from the Bay Area, California (SF) - Ive turned and twisted many times. Finding a happy place in New York in health and wellness, clubs, etc - led me to healthcare, and to discover PA. I would be beginning pre-reqs a new, as well as HCE. I have family support at this time, while I myself do not have a family, and would be able to focus all of my attention on my pre-requisites and HCE without major stressors in life as rent and full time job. But! .... I have hesitated, I am hesitating, for fear of taking two years (or less) to focus and pursue - to not be accepted to any school at 41, or 42 - as the two year process is a huge commitment, undertaking, stress, and life adjustment - while definitely worth it if accepted into PA school. It would be very hard to have taken two years unemployed in many ways, to change career paths, only to find I have to begin somewhere else, at a later age. Lets say hypothetically I receive 3.8-4.0 through all course work/ pre-requisites, and load up ample amount of HCU in those two years. My hold back, my nervousness, MY FEAR - is that at 39 years old I begin, and apply at 41 - to be turned down by every school, possibly two years in a row - I have heard this happen to a younger student, whom had a 4.0 and HCU. He applied to all PA schools and was turned down two years in a row. I cannot afford to put two years of solid hard work and, cover the cost of pre-req's, nor lose two years where I could be focusing two years on something else, as the job market is age discriminatory. I am nervous!! I wish the economy and world was such that I could choose a solid career I am truly interested in, and not have to research around a field so much. I would love to hear anyones thoughts, experience in applying, experience with acceptance rates - And if they thought this was a risk not worth taking? All the best, Laura
  23. DREXEL UNIVERSITY vs. A.T. STILL UNIVERSITY I received my offers only a few days apart, ATSU before Drexel. Before any of my interviews, Drexel was my number one choice. Looking back, I had little basis for this, other than its reputation and I’ve got a friend who is a first student there who rants and raves about it. My first interview was at Drexel, so I was naturally very nervous. I had no clue what to expect, it was an all day experience and I felt brain fried and overwhelmed by the end. I thought I performed horribly during the individual interview (guess not, since I’ve been accepted), but also felt I was cut off with a lot of my answers. Also, certain tour faculty made some bad jokes, which I know were meant to be taken lightheartedly, but with my nerves, left with a tiny bad taste in my mouth. In all honestly, I felt as though Drexel was out of the question and that I would be denied or at best, waitlisted. The acceptance came as a complete shock, but a happy and grateful one. So that’s why I am in the predicament I am now. As far as my interview at ATSU, it was my favorite interview by FAR out of the 6 I’ve been on. It was my 5th interview. Extremely professional and thorough day. They made me really want to go here and I envisioned myself as a student there. It was the “gut feeling” I had hoped I would eventually find. I was sold on ATSU, it was my #1 choice, since I’d already mentally crossed Drexel off my list, but getting the Drexel phone call only a couple of days later, I now couldn’t be more confused. The gut feeling has drifted and I’m 50/50 divided. Truly. If it helps, cGPA: 3.50, sGPA: 3.43, GRE: 155 Q, 154 V, 4.0 Writing, 3 years HCE part-time (~1850 hours), 250 shadowing hours, 100 volunteer hours. LOCATION: For background, I’ve got no real geographical ties to either place. Love the heat and opportunity for outdoor/nature activities in AZ, but also love the city life of Drexel. I know that’s a little contradictory, but I could see myself in either place. I’m from the Midwest and as each year passes, I find myself becoming less tolerant of the unbearable cold weather. Philly wouldn’t be much of a change in that aspect. But, I fully understand that I’ll be locked inside a library 24/7 and won’t have much time for exploring in either place. But at least I’ll want to look out the window and be happy. With that…ROTATIONS: Drexel: First year in Philly, second year maybe in Philly and surrounding area, but I know a current student who is just starting their 2nd year and has rotations in PA, MI, NY, and SD…and is expected to pick up everything and move every 6 weeks. I know this is not unusual for a lot of programs) ATSU: First year in AZ, second year either in the surrounding Phoenix area (no relocation at all), OR relocate for the FULL year to a Community Health Center either in CA, WI, or GA. Less moving around. They are expanding their rotations, but this is a concern seeing as they were on probation for issues with this in the past. EDUCATIONAL PHILOSOPHY: Drexel: Attention to the underserved, rather general and consistent with most other programs across the nation. Liked it, great. ATSU: Entire emphasis on serving the underserved, and practicing with a holistic approach and incorporation of patient mind, body, and spirit. I love this aspect and am sincerely drawn to underserved populations, but am weary in that I’ve never practiced as a PA in an underserved setting before. Of course, I’m not writing a contract selling my life to the underserved by going here, but you get the point. RANKING: According to US News 2014… Drexel: 13 ATSU: 40 LEARNING STYLE: Drexel: Didn’t find a whole lot of difference between Drexel and ATSU in this department, but please correct me if I’m wrong. Drexel encourages self-directed learning, but does give a lot of exams to keep the student current and in check. They will really prepare me to be a graduate level, professional thinker. My friend in the program said that the class is broken up for smaller group learning, and enjoys that. ATSU: A lot of emphasis on out-of-seat and self-directed learning too, which I like. They mix it up with group work, different modules, etc. This would keep me focused and eager to learn instead of sitting in a chair, looking at a board for 8 hours a day. What really caught my attention is that on interview day, current students told us they rarely had sit down, formal exams, but instead were tested in other ways. I trust that I will be prepared for the PANCE at either school, based on percentages. COMPETITION: This is what I’ve gathered from my interview, talking with current students at both, and from what I’ve read. Obviously, in any program, there are going to be very competitive students and those who are not. I can associate and study with whomever I choose. Probably biased though. Drexel: More cut throat and competition between students. ATSU: More encouraging environment. AFFILIATIONS: Drexel: HUGE HUGE HUGE. Hahnemann Hospital. This will be potentially life changing, with all of the doors this opportunity may open for me, the connections I will make, etc. ATSU: No hospital affiliation. But is affiliated with other programs within Arizona School of Health Sciences. Doubt that affects much though. HISTORY: Drexel: One of the nation’s oldest programs. That means something with regards to the type of PAs they produce. ATSU: ASHS began in 1995, but moved to Mesa, AZ in 2001. So, it’s relatively new. BUT, home of the world’s first osteopathic medical school. CADAVER LAB: Of minimal importance to me. I took a full dissection cadaver lab in undergrad along site medical students. I know it’s not the same training as PA school, but at least I’ve had exposure. Drexel: No dissections. Limited access to cadavers. Lab work mostly done virtually. ATSU: Use human cadavers during the first year as a lab component to go along with anatomy. There is dissection. FIRST YEAR CLINICAL EXPOSURE: Drexel: Not a whole lot. You can go over to the hospital and there is a lot of helpful staff willing to teach you things, but this is really reserved for second year. ATSU: Not a whole lot, again. But, 3x each term, there are great opportunities to clinical experiences in clinics, medical examiner offices, fire department, surgery, community health centers, etc. Factors that are also less significant in my decision making process: Cost: ATSU is more expensive tuition-wise, but living in Philly will hike up the costs. Both are relatively similar. Class Size: Drexel ~80, ATSU ~70. Similar. Grading: Drexel 71.5%, ATSU 70%. Trust me, I am not trying to just slip by and get the minimum grade possible during PA school. I take a lot of pride in my work, but do not gauge my eyes out when I don’t get 100%. I also understand that the PANCE is based on all of this info I’m learning during that didactic year, so I need to thoroughly know and retain the information. Regardless, there isn’t much difference between the two. PANCE: I hate that everyone emphasizes this so much. I’m going to pass the PANCE wherever I go. They’re both right around the national average. I’ll be okay. Length: Drexel 27, ATSU 26 Simulations: Both have great, new, state-of-the-art simulation labs. Electives: I’m not basing this choice on this. SPECIFIC CONCERNS: Drexel: I’ve heard and read that their attrition rates are super high. That the class will start out with 80 students and lose 15 due to failing anatomy. Or those students have the choice of waiting a year to retake anatomy and end up on a 3-year track. I know I cannot make my decision based on the anticipation of failing anatomy, but it caught my attention. ATSU: Probation. I know it’s no longer on probation, but I don’t want a future employer to say, “Oh you’re from ATSU, isn’t that the program that was put on probation?” I’ve read two things. One, the program was on probation because students were missing out on required rotations. Two, the program was on probation because the PANCE scores dropped to 81% in 2011. I know it’s fixed now and that at the end of the day, I’m going to pass the PANCE, since scores since then have been 94%+ (last year 96%). I would say from the gut feeling I got at the interview, my choice is ATSU. But I feel like I really really cannot pass up the opportunity at Drexel. Don’t get me wrong, I really like their program as well. Everything I’ve read says, “it doesn’t matter where you go, go where you feel best suits you, it won’t matter.” But when we really get down to it, I do believe that it does matter. It will influence who I meet in my future and future opportunities. If anyone has additional questions for me, please let me know. Also, please correct me if any of what I’ve written is incorrect! Sorry for the long post, but this is a huge decision for me here! I greatly appreciate your time and effort in reading and responding to this. Thank you!
  24. Hi All, After my two interviews this past month, I am finding myself in the situation of having to choose between two programs: it's an incredible opportunity and a dream to even get a choice, I realize, but I'm also really having a hard time because there are definite benefits and drawbacks to each program. I'm trying to figure out 1) what matters MOST in determining which program to pick and 2) which program will ultimately help me get the best job as a new grad. I would also like to give myself the best chance to succeed and have the best quality of life as a student along the way. I'm in Texas and both programs are in-state. Both programs: Both have a very high PANCE pass rate- 98% and 100% respectively. Both have been established for 15-16 years, and have extensive alumni networks. Program 1: located in a small city in West Texas, the program is currently not ranked (was ranked at about the 50% mark in previous years). Class size is 60, PA progam is in an entire building by itself and staff/faculty are entirely devoted to PA students. Clinical rotations are in various cities throughout (primarily) West and central Texas, considers student preference. No thesis project, classes seemed really fun, students were a very tight-knit group. I absolutely loved the environment of this program. The students were all very enthusiastic about making it through the program, there are "buddies"/mentors assigned to you from the class above, and the faculty were supportive and dedicated to making sure everyone succeed. I felt welcomed and could absolutely see myself going there. I was surprised, because I had not anticipated feeling like that at all!! Benefits: shorter program (27 months), more affordable, have offered me a small scholarship, I loved the impression of the program and student life, they seemed happy! Biggest drawback: The school is on Academic Probation status until March, when it will most likely be lifted. As a currently admitted student, there is no risk to me- all students matriculating now, or prior to any future decision will graduate from an accredited program and take the PANCE. Not sure how much reputation matters in job placement?? Program 2: Located in a huge city in central Texas, high ranking program (top 20-30 ranking depending on the source), associated with a medical school/health sciences center/hospitals in a medical center. Class size 45, PA program within the health sciences center, shared faculty among disciplines and shared classes with med/PT/OT. Clinical rotations in central texas (San antonio, surrounding areas, some clinical sites in rural Texas areas). Research thesis project, program seems VERY intense and intimidating. Lots of alumni, great reputation. This program was my first choice going into interviews, but I was honestly intimidated and felt as if I should feel lucky even to be sitting there (much less offered a seat), students emphasized how much time (24/7/365) is devoted to studying, how hard the material was, etc... I felt like the faculty were conveying a similar message. Less of a sense of community than Program 1, for sure. Benefits: reputation, location in a large urban city, affiliation with a med center, possibly better clinical placement. Drawbacks: I'm afraid I won't be able to make it through the program. Intimidated by how difficult and rigorous the program seems. Don't want to be miserable, worried about an uber-competitive, 24/7 studying tortuous process. Less affordable, 3 month longer duration of the program, no scholarship offered yet. So I'm basically choosing between academic reputation and quality of life. I have no idea what to do, I know that 3 months isn't that much in the grand scheme of things, so duration of program isn't that big of a factor. Location doesn't really matter as much for me, I would be totally fine living in a small town in West Texas. My parents are moving out of the country so I won't really have a "home base" anymore. How much does academic reputation factor in getting a job out of school? I would love advice from someone who had to weigh program choices. Basically, the program where I think I would be happiest in terms of quality of life and academic success is not nearly as well-ranked, and has the probationary status flag. Any advice is very welcome, thank you for reading this giant post! I know wherever I choose, I'm going to be a PA at the end. Living the dream!
  25. I'm just curious if anyone knows the overall acceptance rate for PA school. Specifically: # of applicants who get at least one acceptance / # of applicants who apply to at least one PA school. I tried but couldn't find this info on the PAEA website. I know I've read that for medical school the rate is around 40%. Just curious how PA school compares.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More