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Found 72 results

  1. Hi! Just wanted to start this for anyone who is looking to apply to Dominican Univeristy’s PA Program! I’m a current student in their program, so please let me know if you have any questions with applying!! Good luck!!
  2. I'm attending Arizona State University online. I live in Georgia and I'm 24 years old. ASU is a quarter-based system, which means I get college credits on a quarterly basis instead of a semester basis. All PA and AA schools (I'm interested in both) require a certain amount of prerequisite hours, but at ASU, I would be about an hour or two short in a lot of them, like biology, chemistry, organic chemistry, etc. So, me getting a degree in biology from ASU is kind of pointless, because I'd have to take some additional prerequisite classes at my local college anyways. I should also mention I have a job (in aviation) that pays pretty well - about $60,000 a year. I am also in the process of getting my Surgical Technician certifications, but this will take a year or so. With this being said, I have two options: A: Get my Surgical Tech school done and take a really low course load at ASU for Biology to ensure I maintain as close to a 4.0 as possible. Get about 60 of 120 credits from ASU (amount needed to transfer), then transfer to the University of Georgia. Finish my degree in biology, but live off loans. Try to find a part-time CST job while in Athens to keep them as low as possible. Continue with a low class load to keep a good GPA. This way, I'm keeping my grades high, but still getting some crucial clinical experience. Eventually graduate from UGA, a highly respected school in Georgia, with a degree in Biology. Then apply to programs. Most will be far away, so if I get accepted into one of those, I'll also probably have to live off loans for the two years of AA or PA school. Lots of debt, but better undergrad, experience (in life and classwork), and higher caliber school. B: Buy a mobile home for a great price ($13k practically brand new) - a home right next to my parent's. In 3 years, it'll be paid off and cost me half as much as renting. Continue my degree at Arizona State University (online) in something like psychology, since my prerequisites won't count the same anyways. Minor in personal health. Get my Surgical Tech school done and work part-time while attending ASU. Finish my psychology degree, then take the right prerequisites at my local college. Don't live off any student loans until I get accepted into AA or PA school. Option A seems nice. I can go to UGA, graduate with a degree in Biology, have that prestigious college (at least for my state) attached to my degree, finish everything on a physical campus, have easier access to volunteering in research studies at the campus, have 100% of my focus on my school and GPA (this is important as grades don't come naturally to me), and pretty much devote my life to making sure my prerequisites and overall GPA are top notch. The bad - I'd live off loans and accumulate a lot more debt and UGA is harder (could be a good thing for preparation) in their expectations. A lot of good, but the two bad are related to more debt and harder to get a good GPA. Option B seems good too, but not as appealing. I'll undergrad in psychology and minor in personal health (biology/chem/etc not available). Take all the right prerequisites at a local college that should be easier to pass versus UGA's standards. Save money by working as a Surgical Tech and paying $500/mo in a mortgage payment versus $1,000/mo for an apartment. SORRY TO RAMBLE. What's your opinion?
  3. What is it's reputation, are they a good school? I saw they are also having a PA program in Richmond, VA. What about that one?
  4. Is there a correlation between the prestige of a PA school's program and getting a job, or do your boards/GPA in PA school/whatever matter more?
  5. Hello all! I am a practicing physician assistant just 6 months out of school from a bachelor's in PA studies. I want to get my masters but unsure of whether to go with health administration route or public health route. Not sure which one would mean what for me and what are my options to grow professionally. I just need some opinions and guidance. Thanks everyone.
  6. Hi all! I am really struggling narrowing down the list of schools I want to apply to. I have already weeded out those that don't offer a masters, those where I do not fit the pre-requisites, and those that are too rural. I am not picky on location, but I would like to be somewhere suburban or urban. I also would like to be somewhere that the clinical rotations are not a very far drive (I am having trouble figuring this out because it is not explicitly listed on most schools' websites). I am mostly struggling to eliminate schools because I am worried about not getting in. I graduate this semester from a great school and will be applying as soon as the application is released. I am most concerned with my limited shadowing hours and limited service to under-represented populations. Here are my stats for applications: 3.63 GPA, Physiology major that has taken many upper-level biology courses, only alarming grades are C+ in Organic Chem 2 LAB and Gen Chem 2 LAB (My last 64 hour GPA is higher), only 18 shadowing hours (going to get 8 more hopefully before application), probably about 200 community service hrs (haven't fully calculated), 3-5 strong letters of rec lined up, 150 Verbal GRE, 157 Quant, 4.5 Writing, and roughly 3,000 clinical hours before matriculation. I am extremely worried about getting in, and this is making it difficult to narrow my options. I would like to apply to schools that I think I have a realistic chance of getting into. The following are the schools I am interested in. Does anyone have any advice on narrowing down my search? I have over 60 schools listed that I would consider applying for, but the following are my favorites: University of Utah, University of Colorado, Arcadia University, Rush University, Mercer University, Butler, LSU, Augsburg University, PCOM, DeSales University, Penn State, UT San Antonio, Elon, MCPHS, Emory, UT Southwestern, Baylor and Eastern Virginia Medical. Please please please any help or advice is welcome! I am so stressed!!
  7. Hello! i am a sophomore in college and set to graduate in May 2020. I am having troubles finding health care hours. Every job i’ve seen is full time, and i can’t do that with 18-21 credits every semester and two kids. The only job i’ve found is a Direct Support Professional. These people work with disabled people, kids and adults. Working with kids means watching them, giving them their medications, taking to therapy etc, and adults live in group home settings. So feeding, medications, etc. I was wondering if this would count for HCE? The program i’m looking into just says a list of some jobs and says “not limited too” and I emailed the program for help and they didn’t clarify anything.
  8. Hello All, Time has come for me to decide between Pace University (Lenox Hill in NYC) and Rosalind Franklin (North Chicago). Rosalind Franklin is higher ranked, costs an estimated $40,000 less, has a smaller class size, is interprofessional, is closer to my hometown (I can see my parents more often, they're older), and I felt like their curriculum was better organized. The main pros to Pace is the location (who wouldn't want to live in Manhattan!), and ties to hospitals in NYC- I could see myself living and working in a big city like NYC post graduation. I'm reaching out to this forum, desperate for advice- which school would you choose and why? I feel like my heart is pulling me to NYC, but my logical choice based on cost and ranking would be Rosalind Franklin. Anyone who's heard about either program and/or has first hand insight, I would GREATLY appreciate it. Best, Rosie
  9. For those of us with a bit of downtime or waiting to matriculate, what are some excellent podcasts to help get those brain juices flowing!? Please share podcast recommendations pertaining to any PA school related material, clinical, or specialty knowledge in particular. I'll generally nerd out on The Wilderness and Environmental Medicine Live and Emergency Med Cases podcasts (even though a lot of this material will eventually be outside our scope, it's still fun to learn about) in addition to a few others non-PA related.
  10. I thought it would be a good idea to start a thread for people to post their successful CASPA essays so that new applicants can get a better idea of what schools are looking for as they write their own. I will begin by posting a link to mine below (it is posted in my blog). Please comment with your own examples if you are an accepted student. My CASPA Personal Statement (as an example)
  11. pleaseandthankyou

    School Recommendations?

    Hello PA Forum, I wanted to know if anyone had any recommendations for specific PA schools considering my following goals and statistics. I would like to apply this summer for 2019 matriculation. Goals: Ideally I would like to work as a PA in a hospital setting. While I don't quite know my exact area of interest, I prefer primary care, emergency, and internal medicine over surgery. Additionally, I have a strong interest in contributing to research. Statistics/Background: 3.5 cumulative GPA, 3.45 science GPA at a private academic university 159 Verbal (82%tile), 158 Quant (70%tile), 4.5 Writing (82%tile) 9100 hours in paid and volunteering positions in the medical field (almost all clinical research) of which ~2000hrs were direct patient contact. Multiple presentations, with a publication in progress. Lots of shadowing with multiple medical professionals, but getting more with PAs I meet all prerequisites for most schools, but note I took physio without the lab (although I took anatomy with lab), and I never took a medical terminology course Pretty diverse extra-circulars with leadership roles and teaching experiences Thank you for your insight! Best, -pleaseandthankyou
  12. Hello so first off, I'm a senior in high school interested in the health field, and looking mainly at the physician assistant profession. Currently, I don't seem to have the drive to go through 4 years of med school + and many more years of residency. I would also hate to pay off all the debt as well. I want to finish school early, less debt, start a family, and then possibly start a business. However, I heard that PA's have a hard time starting their own clinic and they must have a MD with them all times, is that true? The main reason to start my own clinic is because I want to be a little more independent from a MD, and I like business also. Which states allow me to practice independently? I'm from New York. Now how will I make money? Will I have to pay the doctor more money than me, if my business becomes successful?
  13. I've been accepted to a great PA program which I will start in May. I know there is probably no way to totally prepare for school, and they will teach you everything you need to know, but I have great tuition benefits for undergraduate and graduate level classes at my current job and I can take classes for next to nothing. Any current students, if you could retake or wish you had a better background in any one subject before you started, what would it be?
  14. Hi, I recently began researching into this but am I able to go to an international PA program and then work as a PA in the United States? Is there a specific test that I would need to take or are there any US accredited international schools that I can go to and then return to the US without taking the test? Please let me know!
  15. I just submitted my supplemental application for the UCPAP. Does anyone know when they send out interview invites?
  16. Okay, so I've been doing some research on Physician Assistants and PA schools and different routes to go about doing so. When I first applied to college I was a nursing major but changed it to Gen Ed because I thought I wanted to go into education, but nursing/medical field has stayed on my mind as I was pretty well set on becoming a nurse. I'm still in my first semester at a community college (I was going to complete my first year at community college and then transfer to a 4-year university) so it wouldn't be too hard to change my major; I've only taken the basic classes, i.e math, English, and a few classes to go along with my degree program, so I'm not that far along into it. I've recently learned about and became interested in the Physician Assistant career option and I'm wondering the best way to go about getting into PA school in the future. I know I could major in nursing and then apply to PA school, but I would still need to try to get 2000 (or more) hours. So I was thinking of changing my major to A.A.S- Emergency Medical Science, Paramedic Track, and then working as a Paramedic for a few years to get the sometimes required 2000 hours and then apply to PA school. I guess my question is, would I be able to get into PA school after getting my Associates degree in EMS- Paramedic Track or do I need to obtain a 4 year nursing degree and then apply to PA school?
  17. I'm a senior in high school, and I'm really interested in the health field. I'm deciding between a PA or a MD/DO. However, my Indian parents are really pushing/forcing me to go to a 6 year foreign med school to become a doctor in the U.S. As of right now, I would rather be a PA because: Start working faster Paying off your debts faster compared to MD Start a family faster Less schooling However, I am young, and I feel I might regret not becoming a doctor when I'm older. My parents keep discouraging me whenever I tell them that I want to be a PA. They say that PA's clean sh*t up, get less money, get no respect, and work longer than a doctor while doing the same work. Should I become a PA or MD?
  18. Hello to all, Just looking for advice, My GPA is a 2.98 cumulative and a 3.8 with science pre reqs required for school. Furthermore my last 45/60 credit hours have been a 3.5. I beleive with the latter 2 statistics I could be a very qualified candidate. I also have been a physical therapy aid for over 2 years, done mission trips to other countries played professional basketball, etc. Does anyone know of any schools that view more holistically and look at the last 45/60 credit hours?
  19. So I was recently accepted into the program of my choice, and it starts in January. I have plans to save up for a laptop/tablet that I can use while in school, but I am not sure where to start. I usually buy the cheapest laptops BestBuy or Walmart sells that fit my needs, but I want a higher end laptop for school that I can use to take notes with and run any computer apps that my school requires. What seems to work for you and your classmates?
  20. Hello, I am finishing my undergrad and will be graduating with a Bachelor's in Health Science from Ohio in December. I want to apply for the cycle starting in April 2018. I have not taken the GRE yet My overall gpa is 3.4 and my science is 3.33 I'll have ~ 1500 hours PCE in April as a Medical Assistant/Phlebotomist I have 30 hours of PA shadowing and about 50 MD shadowing I'll have ~500 hours volunteering I plan to have good letters of rec and personal statement I have been researching schools that fit my profile but would love advice as this is all a bit overwhelming! Thank you!!
  21. Very interesting article Appears that the NCCPA filled Governor Jim Justice head with a bunch of alternative facts, but when the real facts came out he realized his error..... http://www.wvgazettemail.com/gazette-op-ed-commentaries/20170603/rafael-rodighiero-justice-prevails-with-bill-to-improve-patient-care Governor Jim Justice made the right decision this week to include House Bill 116, and its companion bill Senate Bill 1014, on his special legislative session agenda. This legislation enhances the ability of physician assistants (PAs) to provide health care to people who need it throughout our state. A previous bill, SB 347, was unanimously passed by the legislature in April only to be vetoed by the governor, who may not have had all the facts when he made his decision. Since then, West Virginia’s 1,200 PAs, through letters, phone calls and comments on social media, successfully urged Justice to revive the bill for the sake of their patients. PAs are state-licensed medical professionals that practice medicine on health care teams with physicians and other providers. They practice and prescribe medication in all 50 states, the District of Columbia, U.S. territories, and the uniformed services. ADVERTISING Instead of a 72-hour supply of schedule III medications, which include common treatments for a range of conditions, including moderate pain, the new legislation would allow PAs to prescribe a 30-day supply, reducing the burden on families who need more than a three-day supply of a medication and, for example, can’t drive a great distance to see a physician to obtain it. The legislation also allows PAs to sign a more extensive list of medical forms that previously had to be signed by physicians, including handicap hunting certificates and Provider Order for Life Sustaining Treatment (POLST) forms. The latter is especially important for patients and families facing end-of-life decisions when people are often at their most vulnerable. This noncontroversial legislation has support from physicians like State Sen. Tom Takubo, D.O., who represents District 17, and recognizes that there are people in West Virginia who simply do not have access to health care, especially in rural or medically underserved areas. He and others see PAs as part of the solution to providing quality health care in the state. PAs in West Virginia are grateful and relieved that the governor has reconsidered his initial position and encourage the legislature and the governor to swiftly pass the legislation as introduced as quickly as possible, because patients should not suffer due to further delays. Rafael Rodighiero is a physician assistant in Logan. - See more at: http://www.wvgazettemail.com/gazette-op-ed-commentaries/20170603/rafael-rodighiero-justice-prevails-with-bill-to-improve-patient-care#sthash.YsY46EV5.dpuf
  22. Doctors Work Together on Plane to Help Passenger in DistressMaria Schamis Turner March 20, 2017Jeffrey Aycock, DMD, was on a plane in conversation with a fellow passenger when he heard a ruckus a few rows behind him. He didn't know what was happening, but the former paratrooper, who served as a dentist in Afghanistan, said that his first instinct was to see what he could do to help. Dr Jeffrey Aycock The commotion turned out to be a frightened woman calling for a doctor because her husband, 74-year-old retired Air Force Colonel Thomas McCay, appeared to be losing consciousness. The cry for help was answered by more than just Dr Aycock, who is chief resident in oral and maxillofacial surgery at the University of Texas Medical Branch–Galveston. In fact, if you were looking for a doctor, the Southwest Airlines flight from Atlanta to Houston was the place to be. Dr Aycock's fellow passengers included a number of medical professionals returning home from the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology Meeting (AAAAI). Among those who came to the rescue were Lenora Noroski, MD, an allergist at the Texas Children's Hospital in Houston, who had been sitting next to Dr Aycock; Kristin Moore, MD, an allergist from the Texas Medical Center in Houston; and Andrew Grant, MD, program director of the allergy and immunology fellowship program at University of Texas Medical Branch–Galveston. Col. McCay was cold and clammy to the touch and sweating profusely. His heart rate was low, and he was clearly delirious. Dr David Corry "It's amazing how much you can learn with a simple touch," said David Corry, MD, chief of immunology, allergy, and rheumatology at the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, who was asked to join his fellow physicians by Dr Noroski. Whatever was going on, it was obvious that Col. McCay was not getting enough blood to his brain. Dr Aycock managed to lay Col. McCay down across three seats, and the other doctors leapt into action. What happened next was a remarkable display of teamwork, Dr Corry told Medscape Medical News. "Everybody self-ordered to get done whatever could be done." Dr Moore and Dr Grant began to administer oxygen to the patient, Dr Aycock and Dr Corry, who has a background in pulmonary critical care, began to track the patient's heartbeat and blood pressure, and Dr Noroski worked to reassure the patient's wife. The airline crew also jumped in to help, relaying information to both the captain (in case an emergency landing was needed) and an on-call physician on the ground. Col. Thomas McCay "It was pretty weird," said Col. McCay, recalling that as he came to on the plane, someone popped an aspirin in his mouth and told him to chew. He could hear the group of doctors talking around him, and said he felt more embarrassed than scared. Although Col. McCay was obviously doing better, Dr Aycock stayed by his side as the plane descended into Houston, and the two of them bonded over their shared military background. "It was the perfect pairing," said Col. McCay, who reported that Dr Aycock has since called him at home to see how he is doing. Col. McCay told Medscape Medical News that he is currently feeling fine and has seen his doctor for follow-up tests. "We just want to thank everybody on the plane — the doctors, the crew, and our fellow passengers," he said. Obligated to Help "I really think that any physician who is in a situation like this is obligated to offer the care that they can," said Dr Grant. Dr Andrew Grant "We don't talk about this often, but a lot of physicians are frightened of becoming involved," he told Medscape Medical News. "But you do your best; that's about all a physician can ever do." Dr Grant said he was particularly impressed with Dr Aycock's performance on the flight. "He was the team leader," Dr Grant explained. "His professionalism and abilities were incredible." "I was just lucky to be part of a good team," said Dr Aycock. "It's wonderful to see people come together and work together." Medscape Medical News © 2017 WebMD, LLC Send comments and news tips to news@medscape.net. Cite this article: Doctors Work Together on Plane to Help Passenger in Distress. Medscape. Mar 20, 2017. Three MD's, a dentist.... and they laid him down, gave O2, ASA and reassurence..... EMEDPA would have done all that, and about 16 more things in the first 60 seconds.... Give me a well trained PA any day!!!
  23. Since 1998 US News has been publishing the only known ranking of PA programs. Their rankings are based on subjective peer assessment surveys of PA program faculty. A useful ranking system should be “measurable, reproducible, and not opinion based! Physician Assistant Programs Ranked by PANCE Pass Rates 2017 http://www.thepalife.com/best-pa-schools/
  24. Hello everyone on this forum! I have decided start on this beautiful journey of becoming a Physician Assistant. I will be graduating spring 2018 and I have decided to apply that summer. This means that if I get accepted into PA school I will resume my studies June 2019 (depending on the school). However, I have something I can't get off my head. Loan REPAYMENT. After I graduate college I have a 6 month period to start repaying my undergraduate loans. Of course I plan to work for that whole year and study a bit. But I don't know if I can afford to pay large amounts of loan repayments during that gap year. Is it possible that once I start my studies as a PA I will be able to "suspend" my payments until I am done with my studies? I am sure I am not the only student on this position, so let me know with previous experiences! Thank you so much! :-)
  25. Had a question for anyone that is currently in their 2nd year or for anyone in the field of orthopedics. My school is offering a rotation in England with a concentration in orthopedics. I am very interested in going but I am wondering how employers will look at this. As of now, I'm thinking i want to go into ortho after graduation but am worried that an employer will wonder why I did an ortho rotation somewhere other than the US. Would anyone be able to share some insight or their opinion? I would really appreciate it. Thanks
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