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Found 12 results

  1. Hi all first time poster and excited to be on this path to becoming a PA. I just have a simple question and want some opinions on if my job would count as patient care experience. Currently I work as a tech on the floor of a psychiatric emergency hospital. The hospital doesn't employ CNAs or MAs as the techs do most of the work. My daily duties include triaging patients who either come through the lobby or sally-port (brought in by cops) and on the unit. During triage I do an initial assessment (what's going on and why are they here), vitals, perform labs, and check blood alcohol level if needed. I then report these findings to the nurse and enter them into the hospitals emr. A second part of my job is monitoring or leading group activities with patients on the pyschiatric unit. This includes keeping staff safe and practicing restraint and seclusion on patients if need be. Thank you to anyone who can give me some feedback!
  2. I have recently graduated from college with my bachelors. I am not worried about my grades or GPA when applying to PA school however, I am worried about if I am doing the right Patient Care Experience or Health Care Experience. I am currently working 40 hours a week as a Physical Therapy Technician and that counts as PCE at most PA schools however, I am not interacting with the patients and learning as much. I mostly do laundry, clean up tables, and sometimes show patients exercises. I am thinking of becoming a medical scribe with Proscibe but, only working 24 to 30 hours a week. I am going to become a CNA during the fall and work part time with one job and a CNA job however, I am not sure I sure stay as a Physical Therapy Tech or become a Medical Scribe. I plan to apply to a PA program in April of 2020.
  3. Hey all Pre-PA people, I am currently gaining patient care experience by working as a PCT at a hospital. Don't get me wrong, I like patient care and working in a hospital but I only make $12.75 an hour and it feels like I am barely making it by. Especially after spending a large chunk of change on applying to programs. I am trying to think of creative jobs to make more money but still get patient care experience but I am struggling. I have almost 6,000 hours already so I am wondering if maybe I could do something that isn't directly working with patients to make more money, but then I would miss patient care. Does anyone else feel this way? I couldn't find anything about this and wanted to see if anyone was in the same boat as me or had any advice. I hope applying for programs is going well for everyone! Emily
  4. Planning to apply to Baylor, UT-San Antonio, and UTMB-Galveston by September. While I do not have direct patient care experience yet, I hope to be hired on for a position soon so I can put on the app that experience will be acquired before enrolled in PA school. I have two positions that I'm interviewing for next week: phlebotomist (3 months paid training included) or tissue recovery technician, which involves removing tissue from donors for transplantation. The hours for the technician position are ideal for my situation right now (nanny). Being a phlebotomist means I will have to drop everything I have going on. Will the technician position be considered novel in any way? Or even be considered direct patient care (this will be mostly with cadavers)? Or should I just go with the safe bet and throw away any semblance of a life I have before PA school?
  5. Hello, I am currently reapplying for the third time, and have a question regarding the updated description for health care experience under CASPA's experience section. I completed 1400+ hours of clinical experience as an Athletic Training student during my undergrad that required hands on work with athletes (patients) using skills learned within our program. A description provided by the school for these hours states: Clinical Practicum course hours are designed to assess student competency and proficiency in the psychomotor skills determined by the NATA Educational Council. The proficiencies address the areas of risk management and injury prevention, assessment and evaluation, acute care, pharmacology, therapeutic modalities, therapeutic exercise, general medical conditions and disabilities, psychosocial intervention/referral, health-care administration and professional development. I am planning to use this exact statement for the Description/Key Responsibilities portion of the experience document. In the past, individual programs have told me that these hours do in fact qualify as healthcare experience, even though it was completed during the educational portion of the program. I am curious if this is a sufficient description of my responsibilities, or if I should expand upon the exact skills or aspects I performed during my patient interactions. Thank you for any insight on this topic
  6. Hi everyone! Confession: I'm struggling to find PCE. I'm graduating with my B.S. in Biology next month, and throughout college I've had some healthcare jobs and what might (might might might) constitute as a PCE gig (I was a caregiver for a girl with cerebral palsy for the better part of a year--LOTS of hands-on, medication-giving, bathing, wiping, feeding, teeth-brushing, etc. experience, as she was unable to do these things herself). I say it might count because it isn't in a traditional clinical setting, but I've had several people (PAs included) tell me they think it could count. So, I dunno. I'd love to hear your thoughts, if you have any on that matter. Anyway, I am going to give it a shot this application cycle, as my grades, GRE, shadowing, and LORS are good, my only weakness being PCE. But, I need a job. I'm about to be thrown out into the world for a year (or two, or three...however long it takes me to get in!) before beginning my program. I want patient care experience--I also want a job that allows me to pay rent. My question is...how do I find this great PCE job?? I have applied to dozens and dozens of them, and have come out with nothing. I don't have my CNA, or CMA. Some jobs I've applied to require neither, as they are private practices and just need a medical assistant for an extra hand. I could get a certification this summer, and I suppose that would be a good way to ensure employment come fall. Do y'all have suggestions? Is there a better way? What did you do? I appreciate any advice! *ALSO: just to make clear, the schools I'm applying to (all in Texas) don't require PCE but recommend it; it would make me a stronger applicant next cycle if I don't get in this year if I stacked up some good hours, but, like I said, I'm a strong applicant in the other components of my application which makes me feel a little bit better.* OK, go! Thanks so much in advance for your advice!
  7. Clinical Research Internship Opportunity Attention all prospective PA students. Are you looking to satisfy the patient care experience requirement, receive a letter of recommendation and earn scholarships to help with PA school tuition? Our clinical research team at Arrowhead Regional Medical Center has four positions open for paid, direct patient care experience in OB/GYN and pediatrics. Actively recruiting trial indications: pre-term labor tocolytic, HPV-related cervical dysplasia treatment vaccine and RSV prophylactic vaccine in pregnancy. These spots are reserved for people that have completed their undergraduate studies and are interested in conducting clinical research trials for a minimum of one year. Full-time hours available, starting at $15.00/hr. Plus scholarships based on job performance (up to $5,000)! Essential Job Functions: Working closely with the Clinical Research Team, the Clinical Research Intern will work on assigned research projects. Tasks and responsibilities include: recruiting study participants; enrolling patients and obtaining informed consent; performing protocol procedures and patient assessments; developing and maintaining databases; conducting follow-up contact; and providing general assistance with project-related administrative tasks. Educational & Professional Skills: Candidates must be enrolled in their final year of undergraduate studies. Successful candidates must have excellent oral and written communication skills, including strong telephone skills; and have basic computer skills (Word, Excel). While no research experience is necessary, as a comprehensive training will be given the first week, it is preferred. Medical assistants As a practicing PA in Women’s Health, I can ensure you this is an excellent opportunity to further prepare yourself for PA school! Kind regards, Kristin Batla PA-C, CCRC OB/GYN PA Fellowship Director and Clinical Research Director Arrowhead Regional Medical Center 400 N. Pepper Ave., Colton, CA 92324 BatlaK@armc.sbcounty.gov (909) 580-3474 and Guillermo Valenzuela MD Chairman, Women’s Health Dept
  8. I have a unique set of circumstances since graduating undergrad and I was wondering if anyone could give some insight on them? I had the opportunity to work a wide variety of health care jobs. I've genuinely loved all of them and being able to adapt to new environments and I've gotten to learn so much from different settings/specialties. Most of all, I feel like they help me see the patient much more as a whole after seeing them in different clinical settings. However, I'm worried that since I've worked so many jobs, it hurts my chances of getting into a PA school? I have not been actively applying for these jobs, but opportunities came up while I was working (I'm fortunate that I have a lot of family friends in medicine) and I thought that, since I was in a gap year, why not take advantage of the chance to learn more about a different field in healthcare? Certified Nursing Assistant (CNA) at an Assisted Living Long Term Care Facility: 2 months (training hours) Patient Care Technician (PCT) on Orthopedic Floor: 3 months Medical Assistant (MA) for Family Medicine Clinic in Rural Area: 6 months Medical Assistant (MA) for OBGYN in suburban area: 6 months (current) Medical Scribe for Cardiac & Thoracic Surgeon: 3 months (current, part time) I've recently been offered a job as a MA/medical scribe for a nephrologist through a family friend. I'm excited about the opportunity because it's a new opportunity to learn a different field and to work in a different setting. I do really enjoy my current job, but to be honest, I've feel like I've hit the point where I've learned all that I could from my job. I'm just as dedicated to healthcare and the PA profession as I've ever been, however I'm worried. Since I've changed jobs so many times in the past two years, does it look bad from a professional standpoint? I'd appreciate any feedback!
  9. Hi everybody! So, I have been on the road to PA school for the past 7(!) years. I honestly didn't think it would take this long but life gets in the way sometimes. I am applying to programs this spring and I've turned out to be quite the non-traditional applicant, as I'll detail below: -Massage therapist for the past 11 years, mostly working independently for more money but also in chiropractic and acupuncture offices as I do now -Life science major at community college (mostly just knowing out PA pre-reqs, before the state of CA decides to get rid of all PA certificate programs at CC's). Did pretty well there. -Transferred and got a BS in anthropology (GPA: 3.7), since I already had my pre-reqs done and just needed a bachelors, I decided to study something I felt would make me more well-rounded in my understanding of people (and boy did it ever!) without having to risk possibly not getting accepted right away due to impacted life science majors at my college -Clinical care volunteer at a large hospital since May '16 -Quit a slave-like scribe job after 5 weeks in the ER to accept a job as a behavioral therapist doing applied behavioral analysis (ABA) with autistic kids. I wanted to be more "hands on", work with staff who bother to know my name, and a huge boost in pay didn't hut either. I had applied for physical therapy aide jobs as well but many of them seem to want people who are on the road to PT and have an exercise background, despite often wanting PT aides to do some massage therapy. Maybe I'm just getting cold feet but I worry that my background will be too off the beaten path. I'd like to hear of any success stories from those who had non-traditional backgrounds yet still got accepted into PA progams, if there are any. Thanks in advance!
  10. I am working on my application in CASPA... and I have a few questions regarding HCE. I know that direct patient care experience would be my job working as a derm medical assistant.. But I have a few things that I am not sure qualify as general health care experience: 1.) Dietary Clerk in a nursing home - I had to create meal plans with the dietitian and residents based off of their meal restrictions, etc. 2.) Residential counselor (senior year of college Practicum for credit) The position was a residential counselor for a group home with people who have dual illness. I had to assist in managing illness/sobriety of the individuals and help them develop independent skills to transition to a more independent setting. Thank you for your responses and help!! Clarification would be great!
  11. Hi, second-time applicant here, looking for ideas on how to get Health Care Experience/ Patient Care Experience. Last year I applied with about 800 hours of patient care experience, which I thought was a respectable amount for an undergraduate student who was working to pay their way through school. I'm looking to make my application more competitive for this year. Anyone care to share how their got their hours? Thank you!
  12. Just wondering how to do the following: a) I have clinical experience from my CNA course. Should I log those hours in under patient care experience, HCE, or don't include them at all? b) Should I put every semester that I was on the Dean's List? c) How do you put job promotions? As in, I started as a CNA, but then I was appointed to Shift Lead, or I started as a Teacher and then was appointed to Lead Teacher. Do I mention that promotion under the Work Experience or under Leadership? d) As for the Awards/Honors section, in the instructions it says "relevant awards and honors..." Does that mean everything that is not specifically health care related should be skipped?!?! f) Also, do ppl actually split experiences based on what "best describes" it when referring to 1 job? For example, since I was working a CNA graveyard shift, maybe 1/3 the shift was direct patient care, the other 2/3 was cleaning and paperwork. If I split it, that brings down my patient care hours a lot lower than I had thought I'd originally accumulated... Boo. Thanks for the feedback!
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