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  1. Hello there! My name is Evelyn Uttikur and I am currently a pre-PA student that resides in Queens. I have volunteered at a local hospital, however, I would greatly appreciate if there are any PAs that are willing to let me shadow them and to impart any advice or wisdom necessary. Please email me at evelynuttikur@gmail.com when you get the chance. Thank you!
  2. Hey guys, I just got certified as a phlebotomy technician. I had also applied for a scribe job and got called for an interview. I'm a little confused about what would look better on my resume? Having a year of scribe experience or phlebotomist. Should I just work full time as a scribe or Phlebotomist? or should I do part-time in both? Any suggestions and insight would be greatly appreciated.
  3. What are my chances to get into a PA program? What programs would accept me? Or should I apply to post bacc/ or masters program? I have a 2.88 GPA. BS in Human Biology. I have not taken the GRE. I am 26yrs Female AA. I have well over 1000 hours of clinical experience (paid, nonpaid/volunteer). I currently took a leave of absence from my position as a High-school science teacher, to take Biochemistry, Epidemiology and study for MCAT (plan on applying to Master of Biomedical to gain acceptance into DO school which is my ultimate dream). I am also considering PA school MY Letters Of Recommendation is from a Chief PA at a hospital and 2 MDs that are Directors of Hospital. I want to remain hopeful but my dreams seem like they are drifting further away from me each day. I need advice.
  4. Last week I got my first official application decision of the cycle. Opening the email, I scanned the words frantically until I found the sentence I was fearing the most. It read, “I regret to inform you of the program’s decision not to pursue your application further.” These words translate much more simply to “rejection.” For a moment I felt like I couldn’t breathe. I knew that I would be receiving rejections throughout the cycle, but had hoped and prayed it wouldn’t be from this school. Not only was this program one of my top choices, but it is also the only school in my home city. The realization that I would not have the opportunity to interview hit me like a ton of bricks. With GPAs well above the program’s average and my state residency giving me a leg up over other applicants, I felt that I would likely secure an interview. I was wrong. After the news, I began to question my application strategy entirely. I chose to apply more intentionally to a handful of carefully selected programs landing on the lower side of things - 6. As the September 1st deadline for many programs was only a few days away I sent my GRE scores off to an additional school that I was going back and forth on, hoping that they would arrive on time. I was relieved to have everything complete with one other program, but I still questioned if 7 would be enough to land me an acceptance or even an interview. At this point I was doubting myself, my personal statement, my clinical experiences… everything. I wondered if there were red flags in my application or if I said the wrong things in the answers to the supplemental questions. I tried to stay optimistic, but I was disappointed and feeling insecure. My first rejection was certainly humbling, planting seeds of doubt that were becoming overwhelming. And then I saw it. I was eating my lunch and scanning my email when I suddenly read “Invitation to Interview” in the subject line of an email from my top choice. My heart started racing and my palms were sweating. After seeing the date provided, only 3.5 weeks away, I could barely focus enough to read about the interview details. I was ecstatic. Their initial email contained a typo and in a follow up email with a correction the admissions director revealed that I was the very first applicant to be offered an interview. I couldn’t believe it. This school was my reach, and I certainly wasn’t counting on being offered an interview, let alone the first one. I was over the moon. Here I am now, in the midst of the cycle with one interview scheduled and one rejection. Things are still up in the air, but I feel that I am at least back in the game. The ups and downs of this roller coaster ride will continue, and I couldn't be happier. Thus far, this process has been unpredictable. Although I have heard this repeated many times here by those wiser than myself, this experience has definitely shown me that there is no such thing as a sure thing when applying to PA school. Don’t be so quick to count yourself in, but also don’t count yourself out.
  5. I havent seen anyone post about wake this year so I started a thread! Has anyone heard back about an interview yet?
  6. Hey everyone! I'm a pre-PA student in Atlanta currently working as a medical scribe. I'm interested in working for undeserved communities and would love to get some clinical experience in the area. Do y'all have any recommendations? Thanks in advance!
  7. Hello! Im a pre-PA student in North Carolina. Does anyone know of any PA shadowing opportunities in the Charlotte area? Thank you!
  8. PA Stats cGPa: 3.1 sGPa: 3.9 GRE: Not taken yet Im 23 years old, looking to apply for the 2019 cycle. Not long ago I was entered into a diversion program for a disorderly persons offense for a drug charge. By the end of program I will be allowed to have my record expunged and move on with my future. It was a stupid mistake that has no reflection my character and goals however is now apart of the adversity I must overcome. I'm a former college graduate who has been working endlessly to fulfill all required healthcare prerequisites required to one day become a licensed PA in the future. Furthermore,I have been shadowing, working directly with patients for over 2 years, a deans list student, and eager to begin a career as a PA. I am seeking opinions on the matter as one day I wish to become licensed. I come from a family of heath care professionals and have always wanted to be able to give wonderful health care to people in need. However, I know that certain things can end up in dismantling or delaying peoples career paths. Do you believe that a clinical site would allow for someone in my situation to take part in the clinical aspect of this program?. Furthermore, does anyone know someone in a similar situation? Ive contacted many schools and they usually give positive advice, however some just don't respond at all. Im just trying to see if this profession is still realistic? Furthermore, would such an incident prevent a student from acceptance to the university? I wanted to be upfront with schools about everything because I rather take the appropriate and responsible steps in advancing my dream.
  9. Planning to apply to Baylor, UT-San Antonio, and UTMB-Galveston by September. While I do not have direct patient care experience yet, I hope to be hired on for a position soon so I can put on the app that experience will be acquired before enrolled in PA school. I have two positions that I'm interviewing for next week: phlebotomist (3 months paid training included) or tissue recovery technician, which involves removing tissue from donors for transplantation. The hours for the technician position are ideal for my situation right now (nanny). Being a phlebotomist means I will have to drop everything I have going on. Will the technician position be considered novel in any way? Or even be considered direct patient care (this will be mostly with cadavers)? Or should I just go with the safe bet and throw away any semblance of a life I have before PA school?
  10. Selling both Andrew Rodican books, both paperback. "The Ultimate Guide to getting into Physician Assistant School"- 3rd edition. Lightly used/great condition. Only one highlighted section (see photos). "How to Ace the Physician Assistant School Interview"- lightly used. A few highlighted sections, most being pencil. Doesn't interfere with future use of the book. Selling both for $30+shipping to respective area. Books sell for full price for about $30 each on Amazon for new. I would like to sell both at once versus splitting the set. I have them listed on the Facebook marketplace (see link below). You can message me there or here on the forum. https://www.facebook.com/marketplace/item/216156642374526/
  11. Hello! For those of you that have applied before or are already in PA school, is there anything that I can do after my applications have been sent in to help my chances? My CASPA application was verified on 6/29, and I have received emails from all of the schools I applied to saying my application is under review, followed by when they will start contacting people for interviews, but is there anything I can do in the meantime besides just sit and wait?
  12. Hi future PA students! UTHSC has just created an instagram targeted towards prospective students (I'll be posting lots of pictures from fun things inside and outside the classroom) and would love it if y'all followed us! Our handle is uthscpaprogram
  13. Put the Highlighter Down and Nobody Gets Hurt By Hannah Turner You’re sitting in class, pulling out your notebook and pencil when you see her. She’s sitting in the front row, right in the center of the classroom. It’s highlighter girl, and she has her game face on today. Her laptop is open and sits to her left, the lecture slides are printed out sitting directly in front of her, pens, pencils and erasers are ready to go on her right, and she has every color highlighter imaginable at her disposal. Class starts and highlighter girl stays true to her name, adding color to nearly every line of text on those printed slides, switching between markers rapidly as she goes. She seems like she really knows what she’s doing. You look down at your notes and can’t help but feel inferior, like you’re missing something. Weeks later, the class gets the first test back. When students are comparing scores you’re surprised to find that highlighter girl didn’t do very well… Maybe you weren’t missing something after all. One of the most important things you can learn in undergrad is how to streamline the note taking and studying processes to allow for maximum learning in a minimal amount of time - you have to learn how to be efficient . Everyone seems to have their own method, and many students tend to complicate the process with no real return on investment. Throughout my college career I have had to find ways to increase my studying and note taking efficiency to create more time for myself. Between upper level science coursework, extracurriculars, part-time and often even full-time work, more time is something that I desperately needed to be successful. Below are a few of the things I learned along the way that allowed me to maintain a 3.9 cumulative GPA and a 3.97 science GPA with a busy schedule in a science heavy major. Put Your Pack of Highlighters Down It’s easy to be enticed by underlining and highlighting the text on those lecture slides, but in reality you aren’t accomplishing much. The idea that these methods are useful in a note taking capacity comes from the Von Restorff Effect, which states that differentiating text by using color makes it stand out against other words on the page, aiding in memory recall. The problem here is that the information on a lecture slide has already been summarized and contains only the most salient, concise points, so you’re often tempted to highlight much of the text on the slide. If the majority of the text on a page is highlighted, you are defeating the purpose of highlighting entirely. Another issue with highlighting and underlining is that these methods are largely ineffective for actively processing information compared to other note taking methods. Writing out your notes forces you to condense and summarize information in your own words, allowing the learning process to begin. If you instead only pick up your highlighter and move it across the page, you’re accomplishing much less. Don’t take the bait! Actively take notes in lecture and put your highlighters away. Consider keeping one highlighter or pen out to make note of extremely important information, and resist the urge to colorize. Note Taking, the Better Way The better way to retain information is to actively take notes, and to take them by hand. Studies have shown that those who used laptops in class had a more shallow understanding of lecture material and performed more poorly on tests, especially with conceptual questions. This is even worse when students are multitasking with their laptops during lecture, creating a distraction for themselves. Although with a laptop students are able to take more notes, there is little processing involved in transcribing the material. Due to the time constraints associated with taking notes by hand, students are required to actively condense and summarize information throughout lecture while focusing on the most relevant pieces of information. This means that the learning starts from the moment the pen hits the paper, building a solid foundation for studying in the future. I believe that for nearly every undergraduate level course, note taking by hand is the superior method, as the speed at which the material is delivered tends to be fairly manageable. When considering graduate level coursework, I do feel that courses move at a more rigorous pace and typing can become a necessity. The moral of the story here is to use your best judgement and prioritize taking notes by hand whenever it is possible. The Next Step Taking notes is important, but this will only build the foundation for learning. What you do with your notes will determine how successful you are in your courses. My next article will address the most effective ways to study and provide tips for the best methods to utilize for different prerequisite courses.
  14. Hey guys, My name is Michael and I’m from CT. I am pretty passionate about becoming a PA, but I need some advice guys. Currently I have my AS degree in Radiologic Sciences and am a Registered Radiologic Technoglost (RT) I am working full time as a tech and about to be married in 2 months. I have been working full time for over 1 year and by the time I’m ready to apply it’ll be 2.5 years. (Is this good HCE?I do 12 lead EKGs everyday) Due to my living on my own and working, and trying to avoid loans, I decided to start to get my Bachelors Degree online in Radiology from a nationally accredited school (PIMA Medical Institute). GPA (currently 3.8) and just finished my pharmacology class in which I got a 97, so I’m defintely confident in my abilities. Once I am done with this Bachelors, I plan on taking two Bio’s with labs, a Microbio with a lab and two Chem’s wth labs at my local community college. I already took my A & P I and II with labs and got A’s in both). I will also take a genetics and a biochemistry class there as well. I have sent out dozens of emails to admins at various PA schools and some say they don’t care if my BSRS is from a national accreditation rather than regional as long as I have my bachelors. For example the (University of Bridgeport, Mercyhurst, MCPHS, SRU, AACC) However those big science courses of course shall be regional. I am 5 months into getting my bachelors and will be done with it in April of 2019. I attached a picture so you can see what my Bachelors Degree entails. Shall I continue on this road? I am feeling anxious ill be denied because my Bachelors is from a national accreditation rather than regional even though some don’t care. (most PA program admissions websites say bachelors degree from a “regionally accredited” while others say just say “accredited”) Should I start over somewhere else? I want to apply to a bunch of PA schools. My fiancé is willing to move anywhere she says for when that time comes. P.S - I am not sure if this is by any means relevant but I’ve done over 300+ hours volunteering at the local soup kitchen for the homeless. PLEASE any advice would be great! I hope I’m not screwed, it truly is my dream.
  15. The Finer Details of the Personal Statement By Hannah Turner Writing is a special form of masochism. You construct something you’re deeply proud of, fretting over the mechanics of each sentence and the placement of every word, only to ask peers and editors to tear it apart completely. You take in their criticisms, ditch the bad ideas and get right back to work on the next draft. Along the way you have to let go of concepts that you were deeply attached to, and it hurts. In the end, the writing process is satisfying in its own right - in search of perfection you can create something really remarkable. The personal statement is an especially challenging form of writing, mostly because it’s so… deeply personal. The ideas and words that you choose to share are reflective of who you are; not only is it difficult to write about and articulate your own personal experiences and feelings, but you then have to submit this material to the editing process, which at times can be brutal. When applying to PA school, the personal statement is a challenging rite of passage that each of us must endure. So, what exactly is the PA school personal statement? At first glance, the parameters appear to be simple - it’s a 5,000 character essay which asks the question “Why are you interested in being a PA?” Although this question seems direct, there are nuances to the essay that are left unstated. First and foremost, implied in any personal statement is the idea that this piece of writing should explain who you are. That means that this is your chance for the admissions committee to get to know you. In addition to answering “Why PA?” and “Who are you?” your personal statement should also chronicle your background, experiences in healthcare and understanding of the PA profession. Although the prompt asks a singular, unassuming question, it quickly becomes a complicated web. A good personal statement will integrate the answers to all of the stated and unstated questions seamlessly. A big piece of understanding the personal statement is recognizing how programs utilize this portion of your application. The admissions committee will have your transcripts, summaries of clinical, volunteer and non-healthcare work experiences, information about awards or scholarships and explanations of any extracurricular activities. Although this is a major part of your application, a lot is left unsaid. They have your resume, but that doesn’t encompass who you are as a person. Are you are deeply passionate about caring for the medically underserved? Do you have a desire to work in primary care so that you can give back to your community? Tell the admissions committee about it! Here is your big opportunity to shine and leave your mark. The personal statement can also give you the chance to discuss any personal issues, discrepancies in your application or bumps in the road. Some applicants choose to address their upbringing or any disadvantages they experienced in their childhood and adolescent years. Others will briefly touch on academic struggles and extenuating circumstances they dealt with that caused disruptions in their coursework. The floor is yours to expand on anything you feel isn’t clear. Writing your personal statement will almost certainly be challenging, but it’s a necessary evil. This essay will allow admissions committees to understand who you are and what has been driving you towards the PA profession. It will give them an idea of what was happening in all of the space between the lines of your resume. Be genuine and get personal, because the personal statement can make or break your application. No pressure. For tips on writing your personal statement, check out this article about the five steps that make the process easier.
  16. Hi everyone! I recently started a job as a pharmacy technician two weeks ago but I submitted my CASPA about a month ago. I wanted to go in and include my new job on my CASPA to show that I was hired and that I will be working as a pharm tech from now on, but I am not sure if this information will be distributed to schools or how to even update my CASPA. Has anyone done this and if so, how did you do it? Thanks!
  17. Hi guys!I graduated in 2017 and on my track to dental school. I actually applied to dental school that year but got rejected to all because I took my DAT too late. However, later tht year I decided that dentistry isn't for me, plus I'm not ready to take on a huge debt afterwards (300-500k sounds scary too me). So i'm changing my goal towards PA. I started researching PA programs and most of them accept my dental assistant hours as PCE. I have around 400-500 hours so i'm planning to finish my prereq (anat, physio, micro) by the end of this fall. Then do either CNA or phlembotomist programs and work for 1 year and a half to collect hours. I'm aiming at 2000-3000 hours. Do you guys think this is a good plan? Or do people generally have way more hours than this?I'm also concerned about why PA schools actually accept dental assistant hours? I know DA have patient interactions but aren't those more towards dental school? Won't they question why am I even applying to PA schoool? If i use those hours, will they ask why not dentistry? I mean i think it's probably gonna come up during the interview anyways. But will it look bad to have DA hours?Also, most programs require one letter from a clinician. I 'm still looking for a doctor, PA, or NP to shadow. I'm puttin NP on my list since PA and NP are so similar. I'm wondering if it's necessary to shadow a PA? I know some programs said it's 'recommended' but would it be ok if i shadow NP (i'm planning to ask my NP if I could shadow her). I'm also wondering about LOR. Since most schools want LOR from any clinician, would it be okay if I actually use my dentist's LOR tht I used to apply to dental school?? I'm not sure if it will look bad for PA schools but im actually really close to my dentist since I worked and shadowed him for almost 2 years. and I outlined my own LOR for him to edit so i know it's a strong LOR too lolAlso, how wuld the schools confirmed that our hour are accurate? Will the schools need our clinicians to sign somethng? I don't have such form from my dentist or the physicians I shadowed back 4 years ago Sorry, I'm still new to PA field and still doing research about it. So if some of my questions are too easy to answer, I apologize in advance!! Thank you again for helping me out!
  18. Hi all, I'm a rising Junior, and after spending some time in the hospital I'm realizing that I really want to be a PA. The thing is that its so late in my college career so I'm feeling like I'm late to the game. I've started looking at different programs and the pre-reqs they require and I have most of them since I am a Bio Major. My questions are regarding GPA, and some classes. So I have 3.21 GPA right now, (rough first year killed me) and I'm actively working to get it up to a 3.5. I've been browsing on here a bit and I keep hearing CASPA GPA popping up, I've retaken some classes so would that mean that my CASPA GPA is lower than my actual GPA? Is there any way I can calculate it? Also would Animal Physiology and Vertebrate Anatomy count for the Anatomy and Physiology requirements for some schools? Here's a little summary of what I have: ~3.21 GPA (hoping to have this up to a 3.4 by the end of junior year) ~203 volunteer hours at a hospital ~Editor at my school newspaper ~tutor differently abled students and ESL students ~gender studies research I'm thinking about possibly applying the summer before senior year and I'm just seeing if I'll be competitive then, or if I should wait?
  19. Hi everyone! I am in need of some advice. I applied last CASPA cycle with the GRE score of 150Q/149V and was rejected. I am reapplying this cycle and retook my GRE today-received 155Q/147V (very upset about verbal) and was wondering if I should use this score for this cycle or retake again, spending another $200. The score is over 300, but does not meet the 50% for each section. A little about me: Graduated from Texas State University 2016 major/minor- biology/biochemistry cGPA-3.8, sGPA-3.8 HCE- 250 hrs volunteer at a hospital, Other volunteer-75 hrs PCE- around 2,500 hrs as a CNA in med/surg Shadowing- 80 hrs MD, 100 hrs Emergency Room PA LOR-asking PA, nursing director at work, previous employer
  20. Hello, fellow pre-PAs. I have chosen human physiology as my undergrad with a minor in Spanish. What do you think of this major in regards to applying for PA school? Is anyone here pursuing the same degree? My top program choice is the Oregon Health and Science University. My goal is to become an Orthopedic surgery PA. Any opinions or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thank you in advance
  21. Hey all -- New to the forum. I'm a post-BA student with a degree in Geography/Economics, where I focused on community development and the more sociological side of things... Years after my graduation, I decided to take the plunge into the medical field instead. I currently am an EMS worker with the goal to be involved with the Global Health field in the future (main interest in water/sanitation/infectious diseases, etc.).. Given the short background, my thought process is directed at doing a P.A. program with the hopes of being able to utilize that both domestically and abroad... SO -- I suppose my main questions are: 1.) Does this seem like a good approach, given my main interest being in global health? I'm currently 29 -- so to try and backtrack at this point and attempt to go to Med School seems like an idea I'm being nudged away from... especially from physicians I've met en route at hospitals and others that I know. Additionally -- I'm wondering if there are any sorts of databases that show P.A. programs with International Clinical Elective rotations? Going from site to site to try and find my best case scenario is becoming somewhat wasteful in terms of time utilization it seems. OR -- better yet, have you heard of any programs that seem to offer this opportunity and/or are the best types of programs for this interest? May seem like a pretty broad and rounded question, but thought maybe you all could offer some insight. Thanks a ton! Michael
  22. Two questions! 1) Does anyone have experience with retaking the GRE? My unofficial verbal reasoning score was wonderful, but I need to up my quant score. Will it look badly if I skip the sections I've already done well in for a program that takes the best scores from multiple tests (this may be program-dependent, just wanted to throw this q out there). 2) Has anyone's official "scaled" GRE score been different than the score noted on your screen the day of the exam?
  23. Hello all, I will be moving to Chicago at the end of May. I was wondering if anyone had any connections or knew of any job postings that would count towards HCE hours for school (MA, scribe, etc.). I currently work as a medical scribe, but if anyone knows maybe some MA jobs that don’t require experience and will train. Thanks!
  24. Hi all, I'm currently taking a general chemistry class, microbiology, and physiology. Prior to the semester, I had heard from multiple sources not to take micro and physio in the same semester but was a bit overconfident after getting all A's in the previous semester. In any case, I'm currently getting an A in Chem, a low A/high B in micro, and a low B in physio. I feel like I'm operating at 90% capacity already and often don't have enough time to study for all of my classes. If I stick it out, I think I can pull an A and 2 B's. But if I drop physio, I'm confident I'd have enough time to study to get 2 A's in Chem and Micro, with plans to retake Physio in the fall. Further complicating this is the fact that I'm a post-bacc student and have quite a few W's from my first time in college (that was about 8-10 years ago), though I haven't had any since I started my post-bacc studies. Should I drop physiology and retake it in the fall? Thank you all in advance for any advice!
  25. So I got a degree in Psychology & Behavioral Science with a minor in biology but didn't take a couple of my behavioral science classes seriously after choosing to go into the medical field and earned two Ds. In an attempt to improve my GPA I decided to try and be superman in my last semester and took 21 units while working full time, including the 6 that I was attempting to make up. I realized a little bit too late in the semester that I wasn't going to be able to keep up with those two make up while trying to juggle everything else and ended up missing the withdrawal date. I received F's for these two classes. I want to know if this will completely blow my chances of getting into PA school. I have an overall GPA of 3.35 (not counting the two F's), a science GPA of 3.49, & a pre-req GPA (depending on the program) of 3.65-3.70. Do I still have a chance?
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