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Found 139 results

  1. Hi all!! Congrats to everyone who got invited for an interview for AACC/UMB this year! I'm so excited! I've never applied to PA school before, and AACC is the only school I was able to apply to (due to finances, proximity to home, etc.) Have any of you been through this interview process before? What can we expect? Also, how are you all preparing for Interview Day? Can't wait to meet everyone! Good luck to all!
  2. I was offered an interview with Medical University of South Carolina and I would love any help that I can get regarding the method, how to dress, etc. Thanks!
  3. I believe invites for Anchorage interviews were around this time last year (based on last years ANC forum feed). Starting this topic for news, collaboration and support. Good luck to all.
  4. Last week I got my first official application decision of the cycle. Opening the email, I scanned the words frantically until I found the sentence I was fearing the most. It read, “I regret to inform you of the program’s decision not to pursue your application further.” These words translate much more simply to “rejection.” For a moment I felt like I couldn’t breathe. I knew that I would be receiving rejections throughout the cycle, but had hoped and prayed it wouldn’t be from this school. Not only was this program one of my top choices, but it is also the only school in my home city. The realization that I would not have the opportunity to interview hit me like a ton of bricks. With GPAs well above the program’s average and my state residency giving me a leg up over other applicants, I felt that I would likely secure an interview. I was wrong. After the news, I began to question my application strategy entirely. I chose to apply more intentionally to a handful of carefully selected programs landing on the lower side of things - 6. As the September 1st deadline for many programs was only a few days away I sent my GRE scores off to an additional school that I was going back and forth on, hoping that they would arrive on time. I was relieved to have everything complete with one other program, but I still questioned if 7 would be enough to land me an acceptance or even an interview. At this point I was doubting myself, my personal statement, my clinical experiences… everything. I wondered if there were red flags in my application or if I said the wrong things in the answers to the supplemental questions. I tried to stay optimistic, but I was disappointed and feeling insecure. My first rejection was certainly humbling, planting seeds of doubt that were becoming overwhelming. And then I saw it. I was eating my lunch and scanning my email when I suddenly read “Invitation to Interview” in the subject line of an email from my top choice. My heart started racing and my palms were sweating. After seeing the date provided, only 3.5 weeks away, I could barely focus enough to read about the interview details. I was ecstatic. Their initial email contained a typo and in a follow up email with a correction the admissions director revealed that I was the very first applicant to be offered an interview. I couldn’t believe it. This school was my reach, and I certainly wasn’t counting on being offered an interview, let alone the first one. I was over the moon. Here I am now, in the midst of the cycle with one interview scheduled and one rejection. Things are still up in the air, but I feel that I am at least back in the game. The ups and downs of this roller coaster ride will continue, and I couldn't be happier. Thus far, this process has been unpredictable. Although I have heard this repeated many times here by those wiser than myself, this experience has definitely shown me that there is no such thing as a sure thing when applying to PA school. Don’t be so quick to count yourself in, but also don’t count yourself out.
  5. Students recently entered into PA programs - can you tell me what happens after the interview? I know some programs will get back to you with a decision immediately, some can take weeks - but when is the deadline for accepting a place in the program? What if (with luck!) you're accepted into a program but still have other interviews? Would love some insight. Thanks!
  6. Has anyone received/had an interview at MSJ?
  7. Hello to all the ladies here! I recently just bought a suit for interviews and after trying on tons that weren't quite right, I found one that's reasonably priced and fit perfectly! I wanted to share in case it helps anyone with a similar body type. I am shorter, 5'3" - 5'4"ish, and have a longer, thinner (note: flatter ?) torso with shorter legs and more curvy hips and thighs. It's really challenging for me to find bottoms that fit well, especially with material that has less give. If your body type is similar at all, I highly recommend this blazer and these slacks. First off, online the navy color looks like it doesn't match, but it's just the images. In person they're a perfect match and are overall more of a dark navy. They also have the suit in black. The slacks appear to be capri length in the picture, but if you have shorter legs they're a perfect ankle length crop which ran true to size. I will probably actually take them up an inch or two, so even if you're a bit taller than me they would probably be fine. The blazer ran one size too big, so I sized down and the fit was amazing. I will have to take up the sleeves an inch or so, but otherwise the cut is really flattering. Best part is I only paid $110 for the set as it's on sale, and it really feels like a high quality suit. Hopefully this can help some of you! Good luck to everyone on their search for the perfect outfit.
  8. Hey guys, My name is Logan and I am a new first year at the University of Florida. It wasn't long ago at all that I was sitting where you are sitting, knee deep in the application journey for PA school. I have compiled a list of things which opened my eyes to the application process after having been through it twice, as well as things I wish I had known going into the process which I think would've helped me be better prepared. A little background on me-- I got my degree in Athletic Training at Nova Southeastern University in Florida, where I was SUPER involved in extracurriculars and leadership positions (multiple leadership positions in my fraternity, ATSO, Order of Omega, Up 'Til Dawn, research, etc) plus employed on campus. Because I was so involved, my grades suffered and I ended up graduating with a 3.4 cumulative GPA and a 3.28 science GPA... Not great. Through my undergrad being in a medical field, I also had a bunch of rotation hours to list on my resume. Immediately after graduation I had a bit of an identity crisis not knowing fully yet what I wanted to do "when I grew up", I went straight into paramedic school to gain added experience and buy time to figure out my future. I applied to the CASPA for the first time in 2015 straight out of medic school and, as you probably picked up, didn't get in. As a matter of fact, I didn't even get an interview... anywhere. Devastated, I decided to get a change of pace and uprooted my life to transplant somewhere else and busted ass working. I also identified that a couple of my science classes were a weak spot on my application, so I re-took them. I took a year off from applying and in 2017 I applied to 12 schools, was extended an interview at 9, and accepted at 6. Here is my list of things I have picked up along the way, and tips for you moving forward. When Applying: Apply Early!!! I know everyone says this but trust me, if you can beat the crowd, even if your application is meh, you may still be a shining star out of the small percentage to take this advice. Your chances of getting an interview is significantly higher the earlier you apply, especially if the program has rolling admissions. Get your application busted out literally as soon as possible, spend a short time reviewing everything, and start submitting them quick. If you are reading this now (posted at the end of June) and you haven't started submitting (or are close to submitting save for some last minute tweaking) yet, you are behind the ball. Get on it!! Apply Everywhere Make a list of literally every school (in the WHOLE US) you qualify for by the minimum standards (GPA, GRE scores, Class Prereqs). Yes, this is time intensive but there are books that can help you outline each program and their requirements. Once you have the expansive list of programs which you could theoretically get in to, cross out the ones which you would not accept even if you were given an acceptance. For me, it was anywhere with too cold of a winter (true southerner and have been in Florida for the last 9 years... 60 is chilly for me, lol). Keep narrowing your list till you get to between 10 and 15 schools. Obviously if you are a perfect applicant with a 4.0 GPA, incredible GRE scores, tons of patient contact, and a resume a mile long with achievements; you can have a shorter list... but since most people reading this don't have the "perfect" application, it is better to cast the net wide. Also- Just because a school says it will accept outstanding prereqs, doesn't mean in reality it will. Why should they take 1 incomplete package when they have thousands of others who offer the total package. Save your money and keep looking. Once you decide what schools you are applying to, make a folder on your computer dedicated to just that school. ex- "PA School Applications" > "University of Florida". Inside that folder, have every document pertaining to that school you can get. Any pertinent research you stumble across, all your essays, a copy of your supplemental application, etc.... You will be happy you did that when it is time to research for your interview. Save Up Money It is incredible how expensive the application process is, and not something I expected when I initially applied. The CASPA applications are expensive, especially for as many schools as you should be applying to. Then you have to worry about Secondary applications. Then when you start getting interview invites you need to pay for travel and the hotel, plus food, etc. It all adds up quick, especially if you have multiple interviews back to back in different states. Plan for it financially and it will be a HUGE weight off your shoulders when the time comes. Assuming you get in somewhere, then you have the seat deposit which is usually between $500 and $1000 - some more, some less. Make Sure Your Application is "Perfect" Before Submitting Every applicant gets the same baseline question... "Why Do You Want to be a PA". Every applicant is going to have a lot of (boring) similarities in their answer which the AdComm is going to read THOUSANDS of times before the cycle closes. Don't waste your one shot at giving them a glimpse into your personality and a reason to admit you. Show your passion for the profession without being cliche and highlight your achievements without sounding cocky or pretentious. PEER REVIEW THE HELL OUT OF IT. Like literally send it to all your friends who can write well. Send it to your high school or college lit professors. Send it to your career services department. Legitimately send it to anyone who will read it and give you honest feedback. Tell them to rip it apart grammatically, and offer them the option to tell you it sucks or put them to sleep. Kick your feelings and pride out the door for this one, if your essay sucks, you will not get an interview anywhere. Period. Once you have your essay as perfect as you think you can get it, hire a service to review it. I used myPAresource.com for my personal statement which was an incredible resource for the personal statement only. The give you line by line suggestions and edits and are ridiculously thorough. Once I got that back and had the rest of my application completed (all the other tabs on CASPA) I used www.mypatraining.com/applying-pa-school-coaching/ to have Paul rip apart the rest of my application to tweak the other parts (the little details you may have overlooked which could damage the overall application). Both services cost money, but were 10,000,000,000,000% worth it in my opinion. It is an investment in your future -- can you really afford to re-apply (again), and also miss out on another year of PA-C pay? Be Smart About Your References!!! A phenomenal recommendation from a PA-C in a small clinic in a town no one has ever heard of, who you have known for 8 years, ALWAYS trumps a mediocre recommendation from a big name in medicine who doesn't really know you well at all. The recommendation letters are a MAJOR factor in the AdComm's decision making process, and I had my letters mentioned in almost every interview I went to. Pick your people wisely, it really does make all the difference in the world. Pick people who know you well, have history working with you, and who think highly of you. Get Experience Get lots of it. Everywhere you can. Volunteering is YUUUGGEEEE in applications. if you have a lot of it, you will stand out. Do something where you are actually putting hands on patients. Looks better on paper and also helps build your bedside manor. EMT / CNA / Surgical Tech, etc are all great experiences (and extremely easy / short classes). Being a scribe is ookkkkkaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyy... but doesn't actually place any responsibility on you except being the provider's lap dog. Once Your Applications Are Submitted: Take a breath, but don't stop being great! The most labor intensive part of applying is done. Now it is just the waiting game which is killer. Use this time to keep bettering your application. Put in OT at work, Volunteer regularly, Re-take classes, etc. Most programs predict your future hour calculations based on the numbers you provide in your applications. You can go back in and add new experiences to your CASPA applications which some programs care about, others don't. When you do major things, shoot the point of contact for the program an e-mail or call the program to update them. Each program gets several thousands of applicants each cycle and although they wish they had a warehouse of people working around the clock to filter through applications and answer questions, most of the time it is just a few people doing everything. DON'T BUG THEM. Imagine if you had 3,000 people constantly e-mailing you and calling you at work... you'd never get anything done... don't be "that guy". Only update for the major things, and save the rest for the interview. DON'T BASE YOUR TIMELINE OFF ANYONE ELSE!!!! This forum is great for getting information... and also for causing anxiety attacks. I applied to UF within the first few weeks of the application being open and interviewed in one of the last groups and was almost immediately accepted following the interview. Don't lose hope till you get that e-mail or letter saying "thank you for applying but kick rocks". Time doesn't always equate to standing in their system. Make sure your contact information on CASPA is correct ***AND PROFESSIONAL****. Should go without saying but having inappropriate e-mails or voicemails may be funny in high school, the person trying to contact you for an interview may not find them as funny. You Get Called for an Interview!! Congrats!! It seems like a dream at first and that euphoric feeling proves all your hard work to that point is worth it. Do your happy dance then get back to business, this is where the intensive work begins. RESEARCH THE SCHOOL!!!!!!!!!!!!! I can't put enough emphasis on this. Research the school so well that you and the Dean over the medical programs are practically on a first name basis. Every program has a website where they usually list their achievements, their scores, their faculty / staff, etc. Commit it all to memory. Make a Microsoft Word document dedicated to facts about the school and save it in the folder I mentioned earlier. Include pictures of the faculty and a short bio or things to take notice of. It is okay to creep a little bit (not like looking in their windows, etc)-- but like google their names, get on their Linked-In accounts. Get on the program's Social Media account and creep on that. Look for pictures and clues about the program, its goals and culture, and also about the students and what they are into. What is the mission statement? Does the program do medical missions? To where? Is the program big in the community? Do the students seem like a close knit bunch having a blast or are they indifferent to being there? How involved outside of the classroom are the professors? etc... You can gain a TON of insight by doing a google search of the program and by looking on the program's social media. Use this site and others to figure out what style of interview you are walking into. MMI / Panel / 1 on 1 / Group are all vastly interview styles and require a different preparation. Most of them have a group interview where you are tasked with solving a problem or working as a team on an exercise. Do yourself a favor and stand in the middle of the extremes on this one. This is an exercise to see if you can work and blend in a group setting... Be too aggressive (not knowing when to shut up / interrupting people) and you will be rated as bad as the person who doesn't really contribute anything to the group. Research Yourself!! Intimately know what is on your application and what is on your resume. You are going to get questions drawn directly from your application and resume... be able to recite the major numbers and have the important details readily available. One of the things I goofed pretty bad on in one of my interviews was not reviewing the independent research I had done Freshman and Sophomore year of undergrad... so like 5 years prior to the interview. It was on my application so it was fair game, and when asked about the more intricacies of the study, I blanked... not a good thing to do when sitting in front of the medical director for the program. Re-read your essay and supplemental apps. You may think you know your application pretty well but if you are not fresh on how you phrase things, etc, you may contradict yourself to the person with your essay literally in front of them. Make Smart Travel Plans Murphy's Law is a real thing and is no fun to try to come back from. I suggest always travelling a day in advanced to avoid any last-minute headaches. I was scheduled for an afternoon group on one of my interviews so I figured I would just fly in on the morning of and have like 6 hours to kill before my interview. Save money and time, right?... nope. My 6am flight was delayed due to mechanical failure until 1pm, putting me in the city at 3:30, 30 minutes after my interview was supposed to be. #Stress. It ended up working out okay, the program was understanding and that was one of the programs I ended up getting into... but if you can avoid that situation, save yourself the grey hairs. Go to bed early the night before and try to get good rest. Eat a balanced meal for dinner -- nothing too heavy or greasy. Day of the interview: The Motto of the Day is Calm / Cool / Collected If you let your anxiety get the better of you, you are 100% guaranteed to fail. Breathe... your preparation has done you well. The Morning of the Interview Wake up EARLY... like whatever time you need to get ready and get to the interview site on time (15 - 30 minutes early), wake up an hour before that. Remove any possibility of having to be rushed and your day will start off on the right foot. Eat a [LIGHT] breakfast. This is the food which will be keeping you awake and happy when meeting people, but should not have you in the bathroom every 20 minutes. My usual breakfast was a small amount of scrambled eggs, a small piece of protein (bacon or sausage), toast, and fruit, with water or juice to drink. Avoid dairy or anything too acidic (coffee or orange juice) if you think that will mess up your already anxious stomach. Leave Your Phone in the Car!!! Even checking your phone during the day can indicate boredom or that you are uninterested... appearances are EVERYTHING. If you rest your head, close your eyes, or even glance at your phone you can rest assured that you are on someone's radar for the wrong reasons. When You Get to Campus Everything, I mean EVERYTHING is scrutinized from the moment you get on campus. Your driving through campus to your destination should be impeccable and the second you're out of your vehicle pretend you're on youtube to be watched by the faculty later. Smile and and be literally as friendly as possible without appearing fake. Every interaction is fair game for scrutiny- from the "Good Morning" to the janitor to the conversations with "random" students on campus or your peers... it is all being watched. I know some programs plant people (like cleaning staff, and "random" students) in your path to see how you react around them. I know of other schools who have hidden cameras set up to watch applicants when they are mingling on campus. From the moment you get on campus till the moment you are at home, assume you are being watched and judged. Any "down time" should be spent talking and networking. Get to know your competition, they may soon be your classmates; plus it shows that you are comfortable within a group setting. Also usually helps ease your nerves to be social within a group experiencing the same anxiety you are. During the Interview Have fun with it. You have worked hard to get where you are and this is your chance to shine! Any interview blog you read (and I'm sure you have read most of them to this point) will tell you that body language is BIG... If you are having fun and are relaxed, your body language will show it. Confident but Humble is the name of the game. Own your past mistakes with dignity and be ready to give reasons why they should look past them and see you in a better light Enter the room and greet everyone individually. Firm handshake, eye contact, and a smile. If you know everyone's name that is a big win and can work in your advantage... but if you don't know EVERYONE by name or think you may call someone the wrong name, don't attempt. Make sure to have a couple copies of your resume readily available with you. Most schools wont need or even request it, but it shows you are prepared if you can offer it or produce it on demand. DON'T GET FLUSTERED!!! Some interviewers will ask you questions to try to get under your skin or try to throw you off your game to see how you will react. It is okay to take a moment and think and breathe... they are looking to see you under pressure. Focus on what they are asking and move forward. I once had an interviewer straight up say " I don't think you belong in this program, nothing about you impresses me" as the first thing when I got in the room... She was looking to see how I responded. Don't let anyone get under your skin and maintain your composure... you can breakdown and analyze once the interview is over and you're at home. When You Leave the Interview Make a mental note about your overall impression of the program, staff, and school... if you didn't get a positive vibe, that will come in to play if you get in to multiple programs. You need to go where feels like "home" because for the next 2- 2.5 years, it will be. Realistically speaking, most people don't get into the first school they interview at because they are walking into it not knowing what to expect and are visibly anxious. Prepare for that ahead of time by doing practice interviews and by getting comfortable talking to strangers and you will be ahead of the curve. Everyone says to send "thank you" e-mails... I disagree with their logic... If there are 200 people who interview at a program, every faculty member who interviews will have 200+ emails all saying the same thing "Thank you for taking the time ...............". I personally would get tired of even opening all those emails, so I didn't send them for the most part. The few that I did send I never got a response back from, which just reaffirmed my theory. Better practice would be (if you have time) to stop by their office at some point either later that day or in the following couple days and thank them in person. That opens the door for a more casual conversation and is more genuine, plus in my experience it went over better in general. Last Words of Advice: If you get in to a school early but it isn't your #1... please dear god put the seat deposit down anyway. That means you can breathe a little easier and are for sure going SOMEWHERE for the following year. Don't hold out for your #1 because you are optimistic and not wanting to possibly eat the money. Again... investment in your future. If you are rejected from a program before the interview, it is okay to ask why and try to get them to reconsider their reason if it is bogus. That shows balls, and also commitment to their program. One of the schools I was accepted to initially rejected me saying they wanted all of the anatomy classes from the same university ( I had 1 formal course from Nova along with a ton of other anatomy-based courses, plus 1 formal course from medic school, and another formal course from a community college from the year after I moved). I popped an e-mail back explaining my situation, the program director sided with me and I was immediately granted an interview. If you get rejected after the interview, some schools will offer advice (if asked) on how to improve for the following year... take them up on that offer!!! Programs LOVE repeat applicants, ESPECIALLY if they see significant improvement from the previous application. Lastly, if you get totally rejected and have to reapply, welcome to the club. The majority of successful applicants have that sobering experience and are accepted the next time around. Don't get discouraged, become inspired. Hopefully at least some of you found this list helpful, I know I could've used some of that when I was applying and stressing out. Don't hesitate to reach out to me if you have any questions! Good Luck and Go Gators!! :) Logan
  9. Hi Everyone! I just wanted to ask here if there were any current students or anyone who had previously interviewed at Slippery Rock and could talk about their interview experience. Was there a group interview and were there MMI? Thanks so much!
  10. Hi everyone! I have a few questions that I am not sure what to do about for PA school interviews and acceptances. Is it inappropriate for me to ask a program that invited me to an interview if they cover any travel expenses? I only ask because the school across the country from me and the interview is in 2 weeks so I am unprepared and a little caught of guard but so excited!! I am just going to struggle to pay for a flight here and then a car and hotel since the school is 4 hrs from the closet airpot. Does anyone have any experience with this? Also, since this interview is very early and I have not heard back from any of the other schools I applied for yet, if I were to be offered an acceptance, is it okay for me to accept while still interviewing at other schools or waiting to hear back from other places? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks so much!
  11. paigeymay

    healthcare reform

    Hello, I am a future PA student and am curious about other opinions on this very important topic. With current and probable future healthcare reforms, what do you see as the benefits, repercussions, and changes on the PA job outlook? I ask this questions from a professional point of view and am not looking for arguments on political stands. Thanks for your input and I am curious to see your take on things. I will start with my own understanding. President Trump has been making changes to slowly weaken Obamacare as his health reform has not been approved. President trump would like to create a healthcare plan for the young and healthy that would be more affordable and less coverage. While this makes sense and many healthy individuals would save money, I see this reshaping healthcare. With more young and healthy having less coverage, I see ER visits and urgent care clinics drastically increasing as many will not have scheduled appointments for their various medical issues. This would cause an increase in demand for PAs in these settings. From what I have been reading, the premiums for those that stay on Obamacare would quickly increase, possibly making their healthcare un-affordable. President Trump has some "pre-existing conditions" that would keep individuals from the young and healthy plan such as pregnancy, abortion, and having had mental health counseling or treatment to name a few. I have also been reading that President Trump would like to extend the short term health plans from 90 days to up to a year. These plans would originally created to fill gaps in coverage, but allowing the increase to a year would have an even more immediate jump in premiums for those who remain on ACA as discussed before. These are all changes that have been occurring or are predicted to occur. Thank you for your input and please discuss any other changes that I did not mention.
  12. Hello, I am a future PA student and am curious about other opinions on this very important topic. With current and probable future healthcare reforms, what do you see as the benefits, repercussions, and changes on the PA job outlook? I ask this questions from a professional point of view and am not looking for arguments on political stands. Thanks for your input and I am curious to see your take on things. I will start with my own understanding. President Trump has been making changes to slowly weaken Obamacare as his health reform has not been approved. President trump would like to create a healthcare plan for the young and healthy that would be more affordable and less coverage. While this makes sense and many healthy individuals would save money, I see this reshaping healthcare. With more young and healthy having less coverage, I see ER visits and urgent care clinics drastically increasing as many will not have scheduled appointments for their various medical issues. This would cause an increase in demand for PAs in these settings. From what I have been reading, the premiums for those that stay on Obamacare would quickly increase, possibly making their healthcare un-affordable. President Trump has some "pre-existing conditions" that would keep individuals from the young and healthy plan such as pregnancy, abortion, and having had mental health counseling or treatment to name a few. I have also been reading that President Trump would like to extend the short term health plans from 90 days to up to a year. These plans would originally created to fill gaps in coverage, but allowing the increase to a year would have an even more immediate jump in premiums for those who remain on ACA as discussed before. These are all changes that have been occurring or are predicted to occur. Thank you for your input and please discuss any other changes that I did not mention.
  13. Hi! I am a pre-PA student and for my PA prep course, it is required that I interview a PA with a few simple questions. This can be done just via email, but I do need your name and to learn a little about your personal career. If interested, please message me and I can answer any questions or give you more information. The questions I need to ask are How long have you been working as a PA? What is your specialty? What do you like most about your work? What about your work would you most like to change? How much contact do you have with your supervising physician during the course of a typical day? How many patients do you see in an average day?How does that compare with the physician(s) on staff? How long did it take you to feel like you knew what you were doing after you finished PA school? That's it! It'd be really interesting to hear your story. Thank you for reading.
  14. Interview Starts at 1:44 , Cooment , Like, Share, Subscribe Pre-PA Student Interview
  15. ELKPA

    Upcoming Interview

    I am excited to have an upcoming interview with an outpatient gastroenterology group. If any current or past GI PAs can sound off on their outpatient experiences, what their day to day routine was like (i.e. most common complaints seen, good resources), or any questions you think would be useful to ask, I'd be extremely interested to hear from you. I already have an idea of the package they offer, and it's not bad compared to others I have seen on this thread. Daily patient load when I asked was ~16 per day. Thanks!
  16. Hello all, I don't have an interview yet, cycle hasn't started, but I would like to hear from those that may have been in my situation. Did anyone interview while (obviously) pregnant and got accepted? If I get an interview, I would probably be 6-7-8 months pregnant (depending on when that would be). That late it will show no matter what I wear. I know legally they are not allowed to ask about it or reject you solely on that reason, but since interview at the PA schools are rather subjective, it's a possibility. Thoughts?
  17. Not sure if this is appropriate, but I'm selling How To "Ace" The Physician Assistant School Interview for $20 shipped if anyone wants it. I wrote in pencil on one page, which has been erased so practically new.
  18. Hi, I applied to SCUHS. I received an email from them after CASPA verified my application saying that interview notification will be sent out in January and interviews in February. Today is January 26th 2018 and I have heard nothing. Anyone heard from them?
  19. I have applied to 16 PA schools and 1 NP school. I've been denied by about 6 schools, accepted interview invite to one school, and still waiting to hear back from the others. How do you cope with the agony of waiting?? Until I received the invite for one school I was beginning to think maybe I'm not cut out for this, or maybe it's because of my race, or maybe it's because of the state and school I came from, etc... Are you experiencing self-doubt? Any tips or advice?
  20. sabrinaxo

    MWU Interview

    Hey everyone! Just a prospective candidate for the 2020 class at MWU. I was wondering how the interview process is at Midwestern University- AZ. What types of questions were asked? Thanks and best wishes to all :)
  21. Hey everyone! I wanted to start a thread to see where everyone is with the application and interview process for the 2017-2018 cycle. It appears as though this program is still on probation, has anyone heard any news? Thanks all <3
  22. So I just found out today after months of applying that I have an interview next week for an ophthalmology technician job. My first instinct is to wear a suit to any job interview, but I've been told by a few family members that it would be overdressing for the job I'm applying for, and to just wear a shirt, tie, and dress pants. I'd like to get some feedback from this forum though.
  23. I got an interview invite in the first week of November and I have the interview on November 30th with classes starting January 2018. The school's deadline was March 2017 for the 2016-2017 cycle. From reading about the program, they normally do interviews in the summer (July to September) and prior to this invite I got an email in July about interviews being sent out for September. Is it normal to get an interview this late in the "game"? What are my chances, if any, since this seems like a last minute or late interview? Should I bring an updated resume since a lot has happened since I submitted my application last year December? Thanks for any help if given! I really appreciate any input that can be offered
  24. Hey Guys, I was assigned two interviews on the exact same date and time. Both schools have a "rolling admissions" process. I don't really preference one school over but I obviously would like to attend as many interviews as possible to increase my chances of acceptance. The schools both out of state for me, but they are in the same state and are only 45 min away from each other. I was just wondering if any of you have been in a similar situation and have any advice for me on how to proceed. Thanks!!
  25. Greetings, I am preparing for a few interviews I have in the near future and wanted to pose this question. All the literature I have found says that I should prepare for my interview, that is, read possible questions, practice my answers, know what I am going to say before I get into the room, etc etc.... and, this just struck me as...odd? So my question is this: Does prepare for your interview mean: Read all the practice questions I can, have an answer in mind, rehearse my answers, practice what I think I should say before hand etc. etc. Or does prepare for your interview mean: Look kid... you've had 4 hard years of school which you graduated with outstanding grades, you've worked hard in multiple settings and collected over 1000s of experience hours, you organically and honestly want to become a PA, all of these things have led me to this moment... so rely on my education, rely on my experience, and rely on my honest and organic drive to become an PA and simply answer the questions as truthfully and organically as possible... even if the answers are not the "right" answer? Or do the interviewers just want to hear the "right" answer, practiced, rehearsed, and articulated well? idk just to me the real world is never rehearsed or practiced... its live, in the moment, and crazy... and you have to just trust yourself and rely on your eduction to do the right thing in that exact moment... why should a PA interview be any different? Thanks in advance
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