Jump to content

jb5158

Members
  • Content Count

    61
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

38 Excellent

About jb5158

  • Rank
    Registered

Profile

  • Profession
    Physician Assistant

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. I did first aid volunteering for the Red Cross and we covered tons of Special Olympics events, however not sure if this is the same since I was through the Red Cross. Basically we had a first aid class at the Red Cross when you joined and we were covered up to the highest level of that training as a first aid worker. So I wasn't working as a PA, even though I am a PA, if that makes sense. If I gave actual medical advice or performed any procedures beyond simple first aid, I'd be overstepping my bounds and be liable for anything that happened but as long as I kept everything to first aid I was
  2. Thanks for the advice! I'll do a little research tonight since the interview is tomorrow. Thanks again!
  3. Hi everyone, I've been working as a PA for 6 years, but started a new job in a brand new specialty about 6 months ago at an academic hospital. I work with 1 specific doctor in a very niche field in Oncology (they and I are the only providers in the clinic). They are looking to add on another doctor, who is interviewing this week. It is unclear if this person will also become a collaborating physician and I'll see both of their patients or if I will still be tied only with my current CP - it sounds like it's up to me and the doctors once the new one settles in and we get an idea of how th
  4. I don't know any PAs who work in nursing homes, but do know some NPs who did. They typically saw each resident once a month for a routine visit and to manage chronic health issues. They then responded to acute illnesses and emergencies. Basically primary care, just going to the patient's room instead of them coming to an office.
  5. I would start looking and at least interviewing since you never know how long it will take, even with tons of jobs available. I start a new job in mid-December......that I started interviewing for in June. They liked me from the get go but HR was incredibly slow. Plus, credentialing can take forever. If I were you I would at least put my resume out there and see how things go.
  6. Thanks for sharing with me! I'm concerned about #1.....I shadowed several hours with different people in the department as part of the interviewing process but I feel like all the encounters I saw were routine follow-ups or good visits, I didn't really see or experience the negative, emotional encounters. I'm not feeling like I'm really doing anything meaningful in my current job, so I'm hoping that this is a good fit and actually rewarding at the end of the day. Thanks again!
  7. If you don't mind sharing, why did you want to get out of oncology? I've been in my current specialty 5 years, so switching to oncology is pretty scary for me. I've (obviously lol) had time to think about it, but I still have moments of uncertainty, especially with the emotional burden I imaging it carries. I know everyone is different, but what did you like/not like about oncology?
  8. Thanks everyone. All pretty much what I thought. The funny thing is that in mid-August, before finding out that they "plan on offering me the position," they had me submit tons of paperwork to HR and basically told me to have all my references respond to their online system within 24 hours to "expedite the process." Two months later and the job opening still doesn't even exist? Everyone I've met there has been great and the manager has been apologetic so I'm just chalking it up to an inefficient HR, but man this has been frustrating! If my clinic wasn't in its current state and letters g
  9. Hey everyone, going through a really weird job situation and could get some other PA's thoughts. I've talked this over to death with my husband and friends, but they're not in healthcare and don't really get it. Long story short, or as short as I can get it, is that back in June I started interviewing for an oncology job at our academic hospital. There were multiple open at that time (inpt vs outpt, subspecialty) I interviewed and/or shadowed a total of 15 people over the course of 1-2 months. They all went fabulously. I met the two docs that I would be working with and both seemed excit
  10. Having four 10 hour days is awesome, I would try to do it. My schedule was set to match my doctor's, so that may actual work in your favor. I have Tuesdays off, so Mondays are never that bad knowing I have the next day off. Plus it's a day to schedule appointments and run errands without using PTO. I'm currently interviewing for another job that would be five 8 hour days and am already starting to mourn the loss of my free day. For PTO, they would just deduct 10 hours from days I'm gone, except for Tuesdays obviously.
  11. Hey everyone! I just got offered a job doing medical oncology. The doctor I'd be working with the most does head/neck cancer and there's another doctor who works part time doing breast and melanoma. I looked up some books on head/neck cancer and they are expensive. I was wondering if anyone knows of any good resources or books that are worth it? I'm completely new to oncology, so even just books on general oncology would probably be good. Any suggestions? Thanks!
  12. More likely this. I'm a PA in a neurology office and I hear the front desk referring to me as the physician assistant so I know it is said clearly. I also know if someone asks what that is, they explain it (not in the best way always, but they differentiate me from the doctor). I have a completely different schedule than my SP, so the appointment is with ME specifically. When I walk into the room and introduce myself, I introduce myself as "J----, the PA in the office." Yet despite all of this, we still have patients who will call me doctor or say they thought they were seeing the doctor. I r
  13. jb5158

    IR Interview

    Any tips for interviewing for an IR job? I'm at the final interview stage and will be meeting with the director of imaging, the supervising physician, and a ton of other people. They know that my IR experience is limited to a clinical rotation 6 years ago and that I've been doing outpatient clinic work for the last 5 years with NO procedures. I'm prepared for all of the behavioral interview questions (strengths, weaknesses, tell me a time when you disagreed with your supervisor, blah blah blah), but should I be prepared for more medical questions? Do you think they're going to try to test
  14. I also know some neurology clinics may have the opportunity to do occipital nerve blocks or Botox. In ours, two neurologists do those to build up their own RVUs, but I've seen PAs in other neurology clinics do procedures.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More