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tiafox

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  1. CONGRATS to accepted!!! Very EXCITED!!! Received my acceptance to Miami by email yesterday (10/16/13) after interviewing last Friday (10/11/13). So glad they are letting us know so soon. I was very impressed by the interview, staff, campus, & students. MIAMI here we come!!!
  2. CONGRATS!!! I know this program will be great! Even though I could not apply this year without my pre-reqs complete I have enjoyed my conversations with Amanda and I owe my current and future success to many great GWU people. ~GWU Alum and future PA, Tia Fox
  3. Thank you so much for taking time to provide us with information. My CASPA was mailed to both SU PA programs on 7/12/13 so I am currently waiting. Just curious, did you apply to both or just Tampa?
  4. My interest in becoming a physicianassistant (PA) is rooted in the desire to provide quality healthcare to thegeriatric population, a group whose healthcare needs I have perceived to becomplex in the course of my work in physical therapy. In the five years that Ihave been a licensed physical therapist assistant (PTA), my most memorablepatients are elderly or as we often call them “Baby Boomers”. As a PTA for thegeriatric population, I am exposed to the complexities of care on a dailybasis. Their multifaceted health care needs prompted my desire to become involvedin a professional capacity. Becoming a PA will provide me with the opportunityto make meaningful contributions to health care while allowing a level ofpersonal contact that fulfills me. Throughoutmy career in healthcare I have had many humbling and life-enhancingexperiences. One patient comes to mind who taught me the true definition ofoptimism. When I met Jim, he was just about to celebrate his ninety-fifthbirthday. Our physical therapy sessions included balance, gait training, andlower extremity strengthening. We called it “dancing”. Jim had seen the harshways of this world, lived in over twenty countries, fought in three wars as anAir Force pilot, and he continued to smile, laugh, and dance. On days full ofdifficulties when I feel like smiling is not an option, I think of Jim andrealize there is always a reason to smile. Asa PTA, I have been fortunate to work closely with many dedicated physicians,physician assistants, and physical therapists with a passion that equals myown. At seventeen I became the second person in my family to attend college,following in my sister’s footsteps, clueless of what I wanted out of life. Mycollege transcripts will forever show mistakes of my youth. This year I finallyconquered my fear of Chemistry by making an ‘A’ in Organic. Athletic Trainingsparked an interest in my early college career with learning sports injuriesand how to react instantly in an injury situation. I grew to love the trainingroom and interactions with the injured players which led me to the path I wouldeventually take into physical therapy. Each semester of Athletic Trainingincluded clinical rotations with a different sport on campus and at the localhigh schools. My second year I was able to do a clinical rotation at a freeclinic in an underserved community where I observed very interesting and complexcases. The next semester my rotation was at an orthopedic clinic. I shadowedthe physician and physician assistant through office rounds while learningabout casting, splints, x-rays, pre-ops, post-ops, and arthritis. As one of tenstudents at the orthopedic office that semester, I was thrilled when asked bythe physician to stay on as an employee. Mynew role as medical technician/front desk reception/physical therapytechnician/full-time student was exhilarating. Those early days were full oflife lessons as well as medical experience. Communicating with people in needwas something I knew nothing about when I started. Over time I grew confidentin my abilities to communicate and become a positive presence in the healthcareprocess. I continued my education, graduated with an associate’s degree andpassed the state board to become a licensed PTA. Over the years, I have beenblessed to see many medical teams in action within various settings includingthe office, hospital, and operating room. Observing surgery fascinates me; sofar I have seen a total knee replacement, total hip replacement, open reductioninternal fixation (ORIF) of a digit, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, andcarpal tunnel release. The dynamics of a great medical team is incredible tosee in action, while seamlessly creating the best possible environment forpatient recovery. I have been fortunate to observe PAs who demonstrate empathyand compassion, along with optimism in many different situations. Theseinsights lead me to the decision to become a physician assistant. Through theseexperiences, I discovered an affinity towards being a caretaker and mycompassion for helping others. Motivated by this, I completed my Bachelor’s Degreeby taking classes at night and working as a full-time PTA. During those twoyears, I was able to maintain a 3.95 GPA to complete my bachelor’s degree. My youthfuldays of indecisiveness were over. My goal has been set high. Thephysical therapy world has opened doors for me to exciting medical experiences thatI may have never seen elsewhere, for that I am grateful. As a full-time PTA,full-time student, and full-time wife I have excelled in time management,communication, and organization skills. As a physician assistant I hope toincorporate my knowledge of physical therapy and orthopedics into serving thegeriatric population with the kindness and patience that they need a
  5. My interest in becoming a physician assistant (PA) is rooted in the desire to provide quality healthcare to the geriatric population, a group whose healthcare needs I have perceived to be complex in the course of my work in physical therapy. In the five years I have been a licensed physical therapist assistant (PTA), my most memorable patients are elderly or as we often call them “Baby Boomers”. As a PTA for the geriatric population, I am exposed to the complexities of care on a daily basis. Their multifaceted health care needs prompted my desire to become involved in a professional capacity. Becoming a PA will provide me with the opportunity to make meaningful contributions to health care while allowing a level of personal contact that fulfills me. Throughout my career I have had many humbling and life-enhancing experiences. One patient comes to mind who taught me the true definition of optimism. When I met Jim, he was one month away from celebrating his ninety-fifth birthday. Our physical therapy sessions include balance, gait training, and lower extremity strengthening, we call it “dancing”. Jim has seen the harsh ways of this world, lived in over twenty countries, fought in three wars as an Air Force pilot, and he continues to smile, laugh, and dance. When I have a day full of difficulties and it feels impossible to laugh or smile, I think of Jim and realize there is always a reason to smile. The healthcare field has been my home for the past nine years and I continue to learn and grow each day. As a PTA, I have been fortunate to work closely with many dedicated physicians, physician assistants, and physical therapists with a passion that equals my own. At seventeen I became the second person in my family to attend college, following in my sister’s footsteps, clueless of what I wanted out of life. Athletic Training sparked an interest with learning sports injuries and how to react instantly in an injury situation. I grew to love the training room and interactions with the injured players which led me to the path I would eventually take into Physical Therapy. Each semester of Athletic Training included clinical rotations with a different sport on campus and at the local high schools. My second year I was able to do a clinical rotation at a free clinic in an underserved community. I observed some very interesting and complex cases. The next semester my rotation was at an orthopedic clinic. I shadowed the physician and physician assistant through office rounds while learning about casting, splints, x-rays, pre-ops, post-ops, and arthritis. As one of ten students at the orthopedic office that semester, I was thrilled when asked by the physician to stay on as an employee. My new role as medical technician/front desk reception/physical therapy technician/full-time student was exhilarating. Those days were full of life lessons as well as medical experience. Communicating with people in need was something I knew nothing about when I started. Over time I grew confident in my abilities to communicate and become a positive presence in the healthcare process. I continued my education, graduated with an associate’s degree and passed the state board to become a licensed PTA. Over the years I have been blessed to see many medical teams in action within various settings including the office, hospital, and operating room. Observing surgery fascinates me; so far I have seen a total knee replacement, total hip replacement, open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) of a digit, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and carpal tunnel release. The dynamics of a great medical team is incredible to see in action, while seamlessly creating the best possible environment for patient recovery. I have been fortunate to observe PAs who demonstrate empathy and compassion, along with optimism in many different situations. These insights lead me to the decision to become a physician assistant. Through these experiences, I discovered an affinity towards being a caretaker and my compassion for helping others. Motivated by this, I completed my Bachelors degree by taking classes at night and working as a full-time PTA during the day. During those two years I was able to maintain a 3.95 GPA to complete my Bachelors degree. My days of youthful indecisiveness were over; the goal has been set high. My determination has been put to the test at times, but my will to succeed remains strong. Each step of the process ignites the spark inside me to fulfill my greatest role in healthcare. The physical therapy world has opened doors for me to exciting medical experiences I may have never seen elsewhere, for that I am grateful. Each day I continue to learn and grow in my desire to serve others healthcare needs. As a full-time PTA, full-time student, and full-time wife I have excelled in time management, communication, and organization skills. My path has not been easy or short but I would not change a single step. Each stride that led me here has enhanced my strong work ethic and desire to serve others. As a physician assistant I hope to incorporate my knowledge of physical therapy and orthopedics into serving the geriatric population with the kindness and patience that they need and deserve.
  6. It was day two of orientation consisting of HIPAA, OSHA, and AIDS/HIV training. Human Resources (HR) was up next to speak when an excited and vibrant voice came booming into the classroom. “Good Morning!” said Mike from HR. “How many of you have ever witnessed or been a part of a client having a bath?” Half the class shot up their hands, including myself. Sam, a quiet kid in the back, volunteered to tell his experience as a certified nurse assistant when he observed a client bath. In Sam’s example, Mrs. Smith is taken from her room, down a long hall, into a shower room. She is then transferred into a wheelchair made of PVC pipes and pushed into the corner where she is hosed down. While this room is named the shower room it is also a location for overflow equipment. During Mrs. Smiths five minute shower, two other people enter the room to take a cane or walker from storage. There is no curtain. Mike from HR asks the group is this example is similar to what we have observed, we reply “Yes”. He then asks if any strangers walked through our shower this morning, we reply “No”. That moment became an epiphany for my life. The healthcare field has been my home for the past nine years and I continue to learn and grow each day. As a licensed physical therapist assistant for five years now, I have been fortunate to work closely with many dedicated physicians, physician assistants, and physical therapists with a passion that equals my own. At seventeen I became the second person in my family to attend college, following in my sister’s footsteps, clueless of what I wanted out of life. Athletic Training sparked an interest with learning sports injuries and how to react instantly in an injury situation. I grew to love the training room and interactions with the injured players which led me to the path I would eventually take into Physical Therapy. Each semester of Athletic Training included clinical rotations with a different sport on campus and at the local high schools. My second year I was able to do a clinical rotation at a free clinic in an underserved community. I observed some very interesting and complex cases. The next semester my rotation was at an orthopedic clinic. I shadowed the physician and physician assistant through office rounds while learning about casting, splints, x-rays, pre-ops, post-ops, and arthritis. As one of ten students at the orthopedic office that semester, I was thrilled when asked by the physician to stay on as an employee. My new role as medical technician/front desk reception/physical therapy technician/full-time student was exhilarating. Those days were full of life lessons as well as medical experience. Communicating with people in need was something I knew nothing about when I started. Over time I grew confident in my abilities to communicate and become a positive presence in the healthcare process. I continued my education, graduated with an associate’s degree and passed the state board to become a licensed PTA. Over the years I have been blessed to see many MD/PA teams in action within various settings including the office, hospital, and operating room. Observing surgery fascinates me; so far I have seen a total knee replacement, total hip replacement, open reduction internal fixation (ORIF) of a digit, arthroscopic rotator cuff repair, and carpal tunnel release. The dynamics of a great MD/PA team is incredible to see in action, while seamlessly creating the best possible environment for patient recovery. I have been fortunate to observe PAs who demonstrate empathy and compassion, along with optimism in many different situations. These insights lead me to the decision to become a physician assistant. Through these experiences, I discovered an affinity towards being a caretaker and my compassion for helping others. Motivated by this, I completed my Bachelors degree by taking classes at night and working as a full-time PTA during the day. During those two years I was able to maintain a 3.95 GPA to complete my Bachelors degree. My days of youthful indecisiveness were over; the goal has been set high. My determination has been put the test at times, but my will to succeed remains strong. Each step of the process excites the spark inside me to fulfill my greatest role in healthcare. The physical therapy world has opened doors for me to exciting medical experiences I may have never seen elsewhere, for that I am grateful. Each day I continue to learn and grow in my desire to serve others healthcare needs. As a full-time PTA, full-time student, and full-time wife I have excelled in time management, communication, and organization skills. My path has not been easy or short but I would not change a single step. Each stride that led me here has enhanced my strong work ethic and desire to serve others. As a physician assistant I hope to incorporate my knowledge of physical therapy and orthopedics into whatever setting I am in. Orientation with Mike that day opened my eyes to the challenge we are faced with in healthcare today. To be upfront, we are all faced with a seriously challenged healthcare system. Mrs. Smith deserves the right to maintain her dignity as a human being, as we all do. The point of Mike’s illustration of Mrs. Smith that day was to remind us all how important it is to uphold our self-respect. We are all human beings worthy of respect. Our healthcare system as a whole will always be changing, but people will always be at the heart of it. As a physician assistant I will take each lesson I have learned and continue to be a lifetime student, taking knowledge with me and treating each person along the way with respect and compassion.
  7. Licensed Physical Therapist Assistant: In this outpatient orthopedic setting, I worked with 6 PTs, 3 PTAs, 1 OT, 1 OTA, and 1 Tech. My average patient load was 12 per day,one hour treatments, mostly orthopedic injuries, some neurologic. All forms of insurance were accepted and patients of all ages. I often traveled between three of six offices within the company. Daily communication with multiple physicians and physician assistants was essential for patient outcomes and treatment. In this outpatient setting I worked closely with achiropractic physician, 1 PT, 1 PTA, and 2 Techs to see a variety of injuries.Treatments consisted of modalities including electrical stimulation,ultrasound, and mechanical traction of the spine. My duties included patient treatments for increasing range of motion, increasing strength, and decreasing pain. I was able to alleviate impairments and functional limitations bydesigning, implementing, and modifying therapeutic interventions. This setting, which I currently work, is licensed as askilled nursing facility (SNF). Within it are also an assisted living facility(ALF) and an outpatient clinic. My duties are in all three departments but mostof my time is spent in outpatient. Over ninety percent of the patient population is Medicare. Each patient is one on one for one hour where I perform gait training; assist with activities of daily living (ADLs), therapeutic exercise instruction, and patient education.
  8. The spacing got jacked up with this format. . . sorry for the difficulty reading. Huge THANKS for feedback!
  9. It was day two of orientationconsisting of HIPAA, OSHA, and AIDS/HIV training. Human Resources (HR) was upnext to speak when an excited and vibrant voice came booming into theclassroom. “Good Morning!” said Mike from HR. “How many of you have ever witnessedor been a part of a client having a bath?” Half the class shot up their hands,including myself. Sam, a quiet kid in the back, volunteered to tell hisexperience as a certified nurse assistant when he observed a client bath. InSam’s example, Mrs. Smith is taken from her room, down a long hall, into ashower room. She is then transferred into a wheelchair made of PVC pipes andpushed into the corner where she is hosed down. While this room is named theshower room it is also a location for overflow equipment. During Mrs. Smithsfive minute shower, two other people enter the room to take a cane or walkerfrom storage. There is no curtain. Mike from HR asks the group is this exampleis similar to what we have observed, we reply “Yes”. He then asks if anystrangers walked through our shower this morning, we reply “No”. That momentbecame an epiphany for my life. Thehealthcare field has been my home for the past nine years and I continue tolearn and grow each day. As a licensed physical therapist assistant for fiveyears now, I have been fortunate to work closely with many dedicated MD, PA, andPT with a passion that equals my own. At seventeen I became the second personin my family to attend college following my older sister to a college with noclue what I wanted out of life. Athletic Training sparked an interest withlearning sports injuries and how to react instantly in an injury situation. Igrew to love the training room and interactions with the injured players whichled me to the path I would eventually take into Physical Therapy. Each semesterof Athletic Training included clinical rotations with different sports oncampus and at the local high schools. My second year I was able to do aclinical rotation at a free clinic in an underserved community. I observed somevery interesting and complex cases. The next semester my rotation was at anorthopedic clinic. I shadowed the PA and MD throughout office rounds whilelearning about casts, splints, x-rays, pre-ops, post-ops, arthritis and more.As one of ten students at the orthopedic office that semester, I was delightedwhen asked by the MD to stay on as an employee. Isettled into my new role as medical technician/front desk reception/physicaltherapy technician/full-time student. Those days are full of as many lifelessons as there are learning medicine lessons. I started as a teenager whoknew nothing about healthcare or communicating with people in need. I continuedmy education, graduated with an associate’s degree and passed the state boardto become a licensed PTA. Over the years I have been blessed to see many MD/PArelationships in action in various settings including the office, hospital, andoperating room. Surgery interests and amazes me every time I am able to watch.So far I have seen a total knee replacement, total hip replacement, openreduction internal fixation (ORIF) of a digit, arthroscopic rotator cuffrepair, and carpal tunnel release. The dynamics of a great MD/PA team isincredible to see in action, while seamlessly creating the best possibleenvironment for patient recovery. I have been fortunate to observe PAs whodemonstrate empathy and compassion, along with optimism in many differentsituations. Theseinsights lead me to the decision to become a physician assistant. Through theseexperiences, I discovered an affinity towards being a caretaker and mycompassion for helping others. Motivated by this, I completed my Bachelorsdegree by taking classes at night and working as a full-time PTA during theday. During those two years I was able to maintain a 3.95 GPA to complete myBachelors degree. My days of youthful indecisiveness were over, the goal hasbeen set. My determination has been put the test at times, but my will tosucceed remains strong. Each step of the process excites the spark inside me tofulfill my greatest role in healthcare. Thephysical therapy world has opened doors for me to exciting medical experiencesI may have never seen elsewhere, for that I am grateful. Each day I continue tolearn and grow in my desire to serve others healthcare needs. As a full-timePTA, full-time student, and full-time wife I have excelled in time managementand organization skills. The path I chose has not been easy or short but Iwould not change a single step. Each stride that led me here has enhanced mystrong work ethic and desire to serve others. Orientationthat day opened my eyes to the challenge we are faced with in healthcare today.To be upfront, we are all faced with a seriously challenged healthcare system.Mrs. Smith deserves the right to maintain her dignity as a human being, as weall do. The point of Mike’s illustration of Mrs. Smith that day was to remindus all how important it is to uphold our self-respect. We are all human beingsworthy of respect. Our healthcare system as a whole will always be changing,but people will always be at the heart of it.
  10. Thank you paadmissions for all your help, you have already answered many questions for me. I would like to ask your advice on helping to clarify the difference between a Physical Therapy Aide/Tech and a Licensed Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA). I am running into some difficulties where PA program admissions do not know the difference and therefore not counting my hours as direct patient care. As a PTA I went through 2 years (6 semesters), received a degree then sit for a National Physical Therapy Board Exam to become licensed. For the last five years I have independently treated patients with various orthopedic and neurological conditions in various settings. PTAs are providers. A Tech/Aide can be anyone who is on-the-job trained and used as an extra set of hands in various physical therapy settings, they are not providers. Although I am very proud of being a PTA I do not want to offend anyone by telling them there is a difference (a huge difference). My long-term goal has always to become a PA. Thank you for any advice that you can offer.
  11. Have you been able to figure how to send your GRE scores to CASPA? It's a little confusing. . .
  12. Kate, I absolutely agree. I am in the same boat as you and somehow have to at least continue to try to get through this. If you do get any help please let me know. icenhourt@yahoo.com Thanks & Good Luck, Tia Fox
  13. Just curious to see if anyone who applied to Nova (Orlando & Ft Lauderdale) has sent official transcripts to the school? Also, I wonder if they reject people who have not finished pre-reqs?? I am currently enrolled in Organic Chemistry so I would think they would take that into consideration, right? Did anyone send them a current Fall class schedule?
  14. CONGRATS!! Just curious as to when you completed your supplemental application? Do you live in NC? GOOD LUCK on your interview. I will be letting you know if I get one!
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