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lrgogl1

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About lrgogl1

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  1. Posting here as I feel this is more productive than in the student or even the pre-student forums. I was reading on the ARC-PA website that AB's program was shut down twice. I've also read it was one of the first PA programs that ever existed? How could they go for so long, being accredited in 1973 to shutting down in 1995. Then being again re-accredited in 1996 and closed again in 2009. Only to be re-accredited again. I am curious if there are any PAs who know anything about these decisions, what the previous PANCE scores were like, and/or if it is indeed a worthwhile program to apply to and attend. Reference for confirmation purposes: http://www.arc-pa.org/acc_programs/prev_acc_programs.html
  2. First, thanks for your reply. This is what I was looking for in the beginning. I was moderately annoyed because I've seen plenty of "Get a CNA/EMT/PCA" job already on the forums. As I stated, I don't really have time to do the long certification routes. EMT takes three to eight months depending on what level you certify for here. So I admit the answer was a bit brash, but like I said, I didn't want that standard answer. Quite truthfully, the area that I am in doesn't cater towards the vital/diagnostic/charting CNA as much as I'd like. To be honest, if I could find a CNA position that just did vitals and charting I'd probably eat it up in a heartbeat. I am in a rural area with only three major hospitals. Those that I do know who have certifications in CNA really hate their jobs. Mainly, I hear them complain about the somewhat unsavory tasks that are required of them and it is a huge turn off. For specifics, a family member CNA works at a nursing home (not a hospital where the tasks may and probably are significantly different) where her primary job is literally to ensure the beds are clean, as well as rolling patients for bed sore prevention and getting them "right for the day." In addition to similar stories from other friends, you can then add the internet research (which exaggerates frequently) which unfortunately supports those specifics. I don't want to get certified and spend money to essentially make a bed, dress patients, feed them, and basically do the tasks that I feel I am "overqualified" for. Please don't misread that as "I feel more important or entitled to anything." I just feel that academically my knowledge should qualify me for a different position, one that constantly takes vitals, monitors charts, even reading xrays. I have read charts before, spun blood, performed and interpreted EKG's, determined what type of medication is for x disorder/ailment, x-ray interpretation, etc... and yes all of that has been done under the guise and comfort of academia. I am clearly not trained in any manner to practice health care however and nor should I be in any position that does -- hence trying to get into PA school and finding an appropriate position where I feel valued for my experiences (and quite honestly, valued for my degree.) I have my BS already in Bio (pre-pro/minor health science) so the undergrad pipeline isn't an option. Truthfully if I had known about those programs upon entering college I would have been more apt to apply to them. As far as 40% of schools requiring direct patient care. I don't really know where you pulled that information from. There are two spreadsheets floating around these forums about tuition, colleges, direct health care requirement, GRE requirement, etc. Your 40% seems like it should be turned around -- 40% that DO NOT require and 60% do. I consider "recommended/suggested" as pretty much "required" as anything. Especially when you look at the threads regarding application success factors and what schools the applicants applied to. Finally, most of the schools that I have on my top 10 list don't take "alternative medical care" like you mentioned above as experience. It might help, but I doubt it. Hope this helps you evaluate my situation a bit further, and thank you for your post, it was closer to what I was hoping for in the first place rather than "get a CNA/EMT cert." -------- Editing post to include previous posts. Utah is required. University of Washington requires HCE as well. I am glad you pointed that out though that certain programs are catered to giving experience rather than already having it. They are really far and few however. Seeing someone else saying it is a lot more beneficial than just "thinking" it on my own however. I do have a few schools picked out (I thought Utah was one but I had to double check, and apparently it is required). Do you really see or hear of applicants with no experience though? This might be a skewed representation of applicants due to well.. trying to over-achieve and doing everything possible, including browsing forums to gain better insight. From what I've read, the chances are basically non-existent without HCE. I don't intend to have everything go my way, I think that is unrealistic in anything you choose to do. You do have some... sway though as to how you approach things for what you feel is best. Finally, Been discussed in other threads, please not here =(
  3. First, thanks for your reply. This is what I was looking for in the beginning. I was moderately annoyed because I've seen plenty of "Get a CNA/EMT/PCA" job already on the forums. As I stated, I don't really have time to do the long certification routes. EMT takes three to eight months depending on what level you certify for here. So I admit the answer was a bit brash, but like I said, I didn't want that standard answer. Quite truthfully, the area that I am in doesn't cater towards the vital/diagnostic/charting CNA as much as I'd like. To be honest, if I could find a CNA position that just did vitals and charting I'd probably eat it up in a heartbeat. I am in a rural area with only three major hospitals. Those that I do know who have certifications in CNA really hate their jobs. Mainly, I hear them complain about the somewhat unsavory tasks that are required of them and it is a huge turn off. For specifics, a family member CNA works at a nursing home (not a hospital where the tasks may and probably are significantly different) where her primary job is literally to ensure the beds are clean, as well as rolling patients for bed sore prevention and getting them "right for the day." In addition to similar stories from other friends, you can then add the internet research (which exaggerates frequently) which unfortunately supports those specifics. I don't want to get certified and spend money to essentially make a bed, dress patients, feed them, and basically do the tasks that I feel I am "overqualified" for. Please don't misread that as "I feel more important or entitled to anything." I just feel that academically my knowledge should qualify me for a different position, one that constantly takes vitals, monitors charts, even reading xrays. I have read charts before, spun blood, performed and interpreted EKG's, determined what type of medication is for x disorder/ailment, x-ray interpretation, etc... and yes all of that has been done under the guise and comfort of academia. I am clearly not trained in any manner to practice health care however and nor should I be in any position that does -- hence trying to get into PA school and finding an appropriate position where I feel valued for my experiences (and quite honestly, valued for my degree.) I have my BS already in Bio (pre-pro/minor health science) so the undergrad pipeline isn't an option. Truthfully if I had known about those programs upon entering college I would have been more apt to apply to them. As far as 40% of schools requiring direct patient care. I don't really know where you pulled that information from. There are two spreadsheets floating around these forums about tuition, colleges, direct health care requirement, GRE requirement, etc. Your 40% seems like it should be turned around -- 40% that DO NOT require and 60% do. I consider "recommended/suggested" as pretty much "required" as anything. Especially when you look at the threads regarding application success factors and what schools the applicants applied to. Finally, most of the schools that I have on my top 10 list don't take "alternative medical care" like you mentioned above as experience. It might help, but I doubt it. Hope this helps you evaluate my situation a bit further, and thank you for your post, it was closer to what I was hoping for in the first place rather than "get a CNA/EMT cert." -------- Editing post to include previous posts. Utah is required. University of Washington requires HCE as well. I am glad you pointed that out though that certain programs are catered to giving experience rather than already having it. They are really far and few however. Seeing someone else saying it is a lot more beneficial than just "thinking" it on my own however. I do have a few schools picked out (I thought Utah was one but I had to double check, and apparently it is required). Do you really see or hear of applicants with no experience though? This might be a skewed representation of applicants due to well.. trying to over-achieve and doing everything possible, including browsing forums to gain better insight. From what I've read, the chances are basically non-existent without HCE. I don't intend to have everything go my way, I think that is unrealistic in anything you choose to do. You do have some... sway though as to how you approach things for what you feel is best. Finally, Been discussed in other threads, please not here =(
  4. I've actually been looking for MA positions that will train/certify while working. I seem to have the exact opposite problem that you had. There are plenty of CNA positions (which I am not that fond of or interested in) but absolutely zero MA.
  5. I've actually been looking for MA positions that will train/certify while working. I seem to have the exact opposite problem that you had. There are plenty of CNA positions (which I am not that fond of or interested in) but absolutely zero MA.
  6. I am disappointed at comments like this, claiming that if you don't clean sheets/linens, clean excrement of any sort, or stock towels, you're not "cut out for healthcare". Honestly, its difficult to even draw comparisons between a CNA and a PA or MD. So saying a bold statement like that is pretty off putting. I was simply looking for information on non-traditional pathways for exposing myself to the health care requirement.
  7. I am disappointed at comments like this, claiming that if you don't clean sheets/linens, clean excrement of any sort, or stock towels, you're not "cut out for healthcare". Honestly, its difficult to even draw comparisons between a CNA and a PA or MD. So saying a bold statement like that is pretty off putting. I was simply looking for information on non-traditional pathways for exposing myself to the health care requirement.
  8. I've been browsing several forum threads, including the statistic ones regarding applications. I am getting slightly concerned because I don't have any accumulated health care experience, direct nor indirect, and I was curious to know if there have been cases where "direct care experience" didn't really matter with applications? For instance, if someone worked as an ER intake representative (which would probably be more along the lines of indirect,) do you think working in that position along with shadowing, could get someone into PA school? I understand there are a lot of factors into committee choices. I am just trying to gauge some jobs which I consider appropriate to apply to. I am not really big into the certification positions since I need to accumulate time in a very fast and efficient way if I want to make it for this application cycle. And yes, I am aware of the search bar and the fact that PA is generally a secondary profession for many people. Not all of us want to travel the same traditional route though, so please keep that in mind. Also if anyone has ever worked as an ER intake representative, I'd appreciate knowing if you actually had time for any patient care duties, even if only minuscule ones.
  9. I've been browsing several forum threads, including the statistic ones regarding applications. I am getting slightly concerned because I don't have any accumulated health care experience, direct nor indirect, and I was curious to know if there have been cases where "direct care experience" didn't really matter with applications? For instance, if someone worked as an ER intake representative (which would probably be more along the lines of indirect,) do you think working in that position along with shadowing, could get someone into PA school? I understand there are a lot of factors into committee choices. I am just trying to gauge some jobs which I consider appropriate to apply to. I am not really big into the certification positions since I need to accumulate time in a very fast and efficient way if I want to make it for this application cycle. And yes, I am aware of the search bar and the fact that PA is generally a secondary profession for many people. Not all of us want to travel the same traditional route though, so please keep that in mind. Also if anyone has ever worked as an ER intake representative, I'd appreciate knowing if you actually had time for any patient care duties, even if only minuscule ones.
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