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wisemakl

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  1. I am looking for a good pediatric critical care reference text. I've heard that the big three are · Fuhrman and Zimmerman. Pediatric Critical Care. 4th Edition. 2011 · Shaffner and Nichols. Rogers' Textbook of Pediatric Intensive Care. 5th Edition. 2015. · Wheeler, Wong, and Shanley. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine: Basic Science and Clinical Evidence. 2007. My question is.. I have no way to go see any of these texts in person. Anyone have any good comparisons on the three texts? I would be learning more toward Roger's just because its the most current - however I'm not sure if that is a good enough reason. I'll be using it just as a reference for understanding the sick kiddos I'm taking care of, but I'll be working in Neurosurgery. Any opinions would be much appreciated. Happy Holidays!
  2. Major in something you love. If you are planning for a career in medicine you will be required to take specific courses for prerequisites regardless of what you major in. Your extra 2 biology classes that you took because you were a bio major, that you wouldn't have as a Psychology major - won't tell you how successful you will be in medicine. Plus, pursuing something you're interested in makes college much less stressful. Have fun. It's not all about the books. :)
  3. I would say look up some information about the role and education of a PA prior to shadowing. Some providers are more accepting of basic questions regarding their role than others. This also depends how old you are and where you are in your education path. If you're in undergrad or have already graduated = should have higher baseline knowledge that you researched. My BIGGEST advice... shadow multiple PAs. The first PA I shadowed did mostly office work. I hated it, and would never accept that job now as a practicing PA. Every job is different, and its important to realize that when shadowing. I also believe you should shadow other related careers: MD, RN, NP, etc. Enjoy the experience!
  4. In regard to your can you work CV/CT less than 50hrs a week. I have yet to hear of a position but I'm sure they exist somewhere. After completing a surgical fellowship, I would absolutely say you should look into Critical Care. Try and get into a place where PAs have high autonomy and there isn't four thousand learners that your competing with for procedures. Additionally critical care has the hours you want.
  5. Thanks everyone for the quick replies. And KateD I would definitely love a PM to hear about your experiences if you're willing to share. The only problem I keep thinking is as follows: I'm doing the Pediatric Surgery Fellowship at TCH, which I'm absolutely loving. However, I've only done 2 months of NS (versus doing a neurosurgery residency program) because we rotate through all subspecialties. I'm not sure how that experience translates the same. Also, if anyone has any job leads/networking I'd love those as well.
  6. I'm slightly more than half way though my Residency/Fellowship program. I'm beginning to look for jobs and am hoping to work in Pediatric Neurosurgery. I am aware of the AAPA Salary Report and do plan to use this when job hunting. Currently, I'm looking for positions in the pacific NW (incl CA), CO, UT, midwest and eastcoast down to NC. I was wondering if anyone had any experience or opinion on salary negotiation and what your residency is 'worth' when job hunting. I know it's very dependent on location, but I'm hoping to be in the 90s for my next position. Any advice or personal experience would be great!
  7. Hello all! I am one of the current PA Fellows at Texas Children's Hospital. I wanted to post on here to make myself available to answer any questions about our program or post-graduate training in general. We do a lot of promotion within the TCH marketing/hr world, so here are some of our postings: http://www.texaschildrensblog.org/2015/06/a-fellowship-of-opportunity/ http://texaschildrenspeople.org/why-the-pediatric-surgery-fellowship-for-physician-assistants-at-texas-childrens-was-the-perfect-choice/ Also, feel free to follow us on twitter @TCHPAfellows Most Sincerely, Kelly
  8. Hello everyone, I'm graduating in December 2014. I have started looking for jobs and thus far have applied for two positions and one residency. I plan to pursue a job in a pediatric surgical subspecialty, preferably in a pediatric hospital. I received an email this week from one of the hospitals stating that I was denied the position because I did not meet application requirements. I was shocked and confused to receive this email (as there was no experience required), so I contacted HR. The woman I spoke with explained that I did not meet the requirements of "state license, graduation from an accredited PA program, and NCCPA license." I explained that I placed my graduation date on my application, and selected a start date for 2015, when I will have completed the PANCE. She stated that it did not matter. I asked if this meant I was unable to apply for any positions at their institution until after I had graduated and gotten my state license. She stated that was the case, unless I was applying for a position that did not need a license. So now, I've been dismissed without having my application reviewed, for a position that I'm extremely interested in. Also, I'm concerned that my application is going to be filtered out of these electronic applications at other hospitals. Does anyone have experience with this or suggestions of how I can solve the problem? I thought of putting on the license/certification sections something like "PANCE - eligible, NCCPA eligible," so that if the application is only searched by a computer using search terms the words will exist on my application. I'd appreciate any help you can offer!
  9. One of the biggest things that pulled me into PA world was the ability to be indecisive. There are many areas of medicine that I'm interested in. I love learning and I see myself changing specialities during my career. It also allows for a financial benefit. Before you have children you can work in a high-stress, high hours, speciality - where generally you will make more money. Then once you have a family, you can trade for the more "normal" work hours. Of course the trade off is that when you switch you haven't spent 5years training in one speciality. So it takes time to learn and get good at your craft. Just a thought!
  10. Hello Everyone! For those of you who got accepted to UT's PA program class of 2016 I've created a FB group for you. I am currently a second-year student at UT. Having a class FB page is super helpful to ask each other questions, get to know each other, and get prepared for this new adventure! Also, Please do not request to join the group until you've recieved an acceptance. https://www.facebook.com/groups/266370746870741/ For those of you waiting, don't give up hope :)
  11. Here's my question.. and maybe I completely missed something in the last 16 months of my life. You talk about giving a steroid shot, one of my classmates who is rotation at an Urgent Care said they do this a lot. I totally do not understand the reasoning? My personal PCP has never done this, and I've never heard of it.
  12. Is the report not on AAPA website yet? (I am a student member) The link posted above does not work for me. It says 505 error. Any help would be appreciated!
  13. Just letting you guys know, they will only matriculated a max of 45 students. They send out batches of acceptances, and once they get declines they send more. And yes, PATIENCE is a vertue, but it's worth it in the end!
  14. No on both questions. Almost every PA program will require a b- or better. Register to retake the course in the fall. And they do not require the GRE
  15. I'm starting a new phone contract and would love your advice. I'm currently on an old Android - which I don't mind at all. But I am an apple person in the rest of life (macbook, ipad, apple tv etc). Majority of people in practice seem to have iphones. One pro is the ease of matching to my computer and ipad. But overall do you suggest an iphone or android for practice? I'm planning on using apps like epocrates, medscape, etc. Which phone would you suggest? And any favorite apps? Thanks a million
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