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FfIghter23

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FfIghter23 last won the day on March 28 2016

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  1. From their website: April 6-10 Phoenix, AZ. San Antonio in 2018
  2. Once again, you need to respond about your background if you want people to take you seriously. You have asked questions about residency and obtaining jobs... Formulating differential diagnosis... Best textbooks for each specialty and board exams... And pay rates. And for all we know you haven't even matriculated into PA school (I'm 100% sure you haven't). So understand when people say you are getting WAY ahead of yourself.
  3. This interview with the Univ. of Iowa Program director will help clear up all of the misinformation regarding their program. They take the same classes as MD students for first three mini-semesters only. Skip to 2:30 in the video https://youtu.be/K5rxX3Km25k
  4. Ah, Dunning-Kruger at its finest. Your purely anecdotal experience with med students is not the norm.
  5. So, every provider is different in how productive they are. A lot has to do with how you document (basically what boxes to check) and billing/coding. The median work RVUs for family physicians in ambulatory care in the MGMA data tables were 5,468, while the median for general internists were only 5,233. I'd say this will be attainable after a year of practice or so. Keep a close eye your first year on your RVU data. You will be able to figure out how to work hard enough to achieve what will make you happy in bonuses. As Mark Twain once put it, "Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please."
  6. Is that 1099? Doesn't seem like you have full-time hours either. For an urgent care where I was expected to see 30+ patients a day, I wouldn't accept anything less than $60/hr. They are making a killing off of you. Procedures as well?
  7. Still keep my EMT-P, CCEMT-P, FP-C. A little bit of a hassle. May do some flying again later on in career so I won't let them go. The CE creds aren't a hassle as I'm required to keep up ACLS, PALS, FCCS, etc. anyways.
  8. The title of the article in the April edition of JAPPA. Written by an NP/PA. http://journals.lww.com/jaapa/pages/articleviewer.aspx?mobile=0&year=2016&issue=04000&article=00001&type=Fulltext Thoughts? I find it to be quite weak in actual content (especially for a PA journal) and the article focuses mainly on NPs and their ability to practice independently in primary care settings. It equates PA and NP training to be equal.
  9. The average FM doc makes 225k in my area. What people miss when comparing PA salary to an FM doc salary is that they are two different career paths. For physicians, they finish their education and then they have to play the match game. There are several docs who wish they had the grades and Step I scores to match into something other than FM but unfortunately they have no shot. They may be making more money than a PA, but many are unhappy. My cousin is a prime example of this. Matched into FM, as his backup, after interviewing at 20+ EM programs and then interviewed at a few FM programs as backup. Certain specialties are getting harder and harder to match into. The dumbest PA in a graduating class (barely passing, squeaks by PANCE) can work in surgery, dermatology, orthopedics, emergency medicine, etc... As long as someone hires them. Not going through the match and essentially picking your specialty is worth more than money in my opinion. Plus, if you are unhappy in a specialty, guess what... send a few resumes out and you can probably get a job in something totally different.
  10. The number of unintentional deaths by firearm ages 0-14 is actually 69 according to the CDC for most recent data (2013). See page 41 at below link. There were 8 deaths of undetermined intent with a firearm, so I'm assuming a few where suicide/homicide couldn't be ruled out. http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nvsr/nvsr64/nvsr64_02.pdf
  11. Unfortunately documentation is king in billing and RVUs. The way EM contracts should be set up in a true democratic group: base salary + profit sharing. PAs absolutely should be included in this. Most PAs aren't business savvy enough to negotiate this. Especially recent graduates who don't understand their worth. I'm not saying PAs should be paid like physicians, but there is a better way than RVU model. Tracking RVUs are waste of time to providers and it hinders practicing evidenced based medicine.
  12. See article, I hope this position goes to a PA over an NP, especially one with EMS and Primary Care experience: http://www.emsworld.com/news/12184210/wash-agency-set-to-roll-out-new-emergency-response-plan March 18--Lacey City Council got a glimpse of the city's emergency response future on Thursday -- one in which less serious medical calls to 911 wouldn't be handled by firefighters, paramedics and private ambulance companies, but possibly by as few as two people. That was the thrust of a presentation given by Lacey Fire District 3 Chief Steve Brooks, who outlined an emergency response model that has been studied by the district, and that it hopes to implement later this year. Simply put: the fire district is looking to alleviate the increasing demand for its services in a more efficient and cost-effective manner. Fewer resources devoted to less serious medical calls means the district can focus on real emergencies, such as fighting fires or responding to heart attack calls. As Lacey and its urban growth area grow, emergency call volumes continue to rise for the district, Brooks said. In the past few years, call volumes have gone up 8 percent to 10 percent a year. The first quarter of this year is almost over and yet call volumes are already 9 percent higher than the same period last year, he said. Among the calls are those less serious medical calls, yet the response in that situation might include an engine, paramedics and a private ambulance company, which results in a trip to a local emergency room. Brooks said some people call 911 for their primary health care needs, instead of visiting a doctor. The alternative -- and it's a model that currently is under way in Mesa, Arizona, Brooks said -- is to pair a firefighter-paramedic with a nurse practitioner or physician assistant. They would respond to that less serious medical call, and either deliver the patient to an urgent care center, or offer a higher level of care on the spot, with a referral to a doctor, he said. The same model also could be applied to mental health needs by pairing the firefighter-paramedic with a behavioral health specialist, Brooks said. He added that the Olympia Fire Department is interested in that model for mental health issues the department encounters in downtown Olympia. Both approaches show cost savings, said Brooks, citing the Mesa example. Costs per patient were under $400, compared to $3,000 for delivering a patient to an emergency room, or about $12,000 for a mental health patient requiring a longer stay in an emergency room. "There is the potential for significant cost savings," Brooks said. Lacey Mayor Andy Ryder inquired about how the district plans to fund the program. A specific dollar figure wasn't shared, but Brooks said the district's fire commission is committed to some level of investment to show that the program has value, such as adding a nurse practitioner in lieu of adding another firefighter position, Brooks said. Paying for the service after that might mean some form of cost recovery: billing for the service and getting private insurance companies involved -- and they might be interested if the program is a success, he said. The fire district hopes to roll out a version of the program in the third quarter of the year, Brooks said. Rolf Boone: 360-754-5403, @rolf_boone Copyright 2016 - The Olympian (Olympia, Wash.)
  13. Sadly, hospital administrators and those making many decisions in health care are "degree creeps." All they see is doctorate > masters > bachelors > certificate. Making a $15,000 investment into a piece of paper may be worth it down the road when "doctorate level" PAs are preferred for positions. Once again, we are heading down the same path as PharmD, DPT, DNP, etc. I still don't know the answer, but there has to be a better way to assimilate PAs into abridged MD/DO programs and into residencies. No more of these worthless degrees, please. (And I'm talking to you-- AAPA)
  14. *Red Alert* Family Docs in an ER who don't want to play by the rules shouldn't be in EM. In recent years EM has become more academic. There are reasons why we do what we do in the ER. Yes, the early days of EM were interns running the department. Not anymore. I would find a different job. I know several FM docs that work in ERs. They keep up with what's going on in the EM world and have adjusted their practice accordingly.
  15. Yep, here is how Mesa, AZ does it: http://www.mesaaz.gov/home/showdocument?id=122 I think having a good relationship with an EMS medical director and pitching the plan to city EMS/Fire could get you a long way. It is better for patient care (definitive care reached in a shorter time) and better for 911 system (opens up units for real emergencies). I think the Mesa system has been collecting data and hopefully that will become available. If it's a cost saving tool for cities I'm sure they will be on board. The hospital systems may be wary as its bad for business...
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