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TThielen

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  1. To respond to GreenMood, this is not true. Whoever your lender is gave you false information, maybe unintentionally but still false. I recently built a new home and got the Physician mortgage (PAs do qualify, at least through the band I went through). I put down 0% and got a lower rate by almost 0.5% than a conventional loan offered (which was still good). The physician loan also allows you to avoid PMI insurance (something a conventional loan makes you pay unless you put down 20% or more on the loan). It is a 15 year arm, but I plan to have my home paid off before the 15 years anyway (no penalty for paying early) and if I don't for whatever reason I would just refinance. I am not sure if this varies by state but I know there are only a few banks that offer this loan anyways (I went through Dart Bank in Michigan). MGriffiths if you have any questions you can send me a message.
  2. TThielen

    What to do right after high school?

    1. You need a bachelor's (4 year) degree to apply to almost all PA schools. 2. Yes but not required. 3. Shadowing is to follow around a PA during their shift to get a feel for what the profession is like. 4. after your bachelor's, PA school is a 2 year Master's degree. 5. Yes! Work while you are getting your Bachelor's if you can.
  3. TThielen

    NHSC position salaries

    I have yet to read any posts about NHSC haters??? Where are you reading this at?
  4. I think MS can affect you emotionally as well as some cognitive functioning like memory loss and concentration among other things. To what degree, we will see what the OP says. I think that it is fairly rare for it to affect the person to the point that they shouldn't be able to practice medicine from a cognitive standpoint, physically is another question??? This is copied directly from the www.nationalmssociety.org website..... Cognition refers to a range of high-level brain functions, including the ability to learn and remember information: organize, plan, and problem-solve; focus, maintain, and shift attention as necessary; understand and use language; accurately perceive the environment, and perform calculations. Cognitive changes are common in people with MS—approximately 50% of people with MS will develop problems with cognition. A person may experience difficulties in only one or two areas of cognitive functioning or in several. Only 5-10% of persons with MS develop problems severe enough to interfere significantly with everyday activities. In very rare instances cognitive dysfunction may become so severe that the person can no longer be cared for at home. [h=2]Cognitive Functions Affected in MS[/h]In MS, certain functions are more likely to be affected than others: Memory (acquiring, retaining, and retrieving new information) Attention and concentration (particularly divided attention) Information processing (dealing with information gathered by the five senses) Executive functions (planning and prioritizing) Visuospatial functions (visual perception and constructional abilities) Verbal fluency (word-finding) Certain functions are likely to remain intact: General intellect Long-term (remote) memory Conversational skill Reading comprehension
  5. Why does it seems like it's common for internal medicine docs to shoot down the PA profession? The internal med doc at the hospital I work at is always making jabs about how I should consider something else....even though he claims he's just "picking" on me, I know he honestly has a serious intent to his comments.
  6. Good point! I agree, it just depends on who you work with and where you work. I feel like a much higher percentage of the PA jobs are positive experiences versus what has been posted on this thread!
  7. Michigan??? It seems to be about equal with NPs here from what I can tell.
  8. upperc- I am in the same situation as you. I was a former teacher, now in my mid 30s and start PA school in the fall, don't want to do MD school because of family and little ones and I like the versatility that the PA profession gives you. I think it just depends on who and where you work. There will always be those who disrespect the PA profession from docs to patients, but it's not much different than any other job, there are doubters in every profession. I was talking to the doc last night at the hospital I work at and he keeps trying to convince me not to go into PA. One of the nurses said something to me about school and he said, "he doesn't want to be a nurse and take orders/get bossed around, he wants to be a PA and have to take orders and be bossed around." I said, you're still trying to convince me not to go into PA school aren't you?" He said he was just picking on me, and he was but somewhere in there he was being serious. It's all about who you work for/with and how they treat you that matters.
  9. If you have worked, are currently working, or know someone who works as a PA in Michigan can you please share what specialty, how much experience and what your PA salary range is/was? Just curious for when it's time to start the job search what to expect. Thank you.
  10. If you have worked, are currently working, or know someone who works as a PA in Michigan can you please share what specialty, how much experience and what your PA salary range is/was? Just curious for when it's time to start the job search what to expect. Thank you.
  11. TThielen

    Becoming desensitized during clinicals

    Yes going in hungry is a disaster waiting to happen. With my first born child I had plenty to eat and helped with the delivery and had no problems whatsoever from the visualization or smell of the amniotic fluid (which is a smell all to it's own). With my 2nd child I went in loaded up on caffeine from coffee and an empty stomach, had to take a seat and get some crackers/juice from the nurses because I felt I was going to blackout...And I have watched and stood over the shoulder of the surgeon in numerous open heart procedures with no problems. Just don't eat right before you walk in you might send it back up.
  12. TThielen

    Becoming desensitized during clinicals

    Yes going in hungry is a disaster waiting to happen. With my first born child I had plenty to eat and helped with the delivery and had no problems whatsoever from the visualization or smell of the amniotic fluid (which is a smell all to it's own). With my 2nd child I went in loaded up on caffeine from coffee and an empty stomach, had to take a seat and get some crackers/juice from the nurses because I felt I was going to blackout...And I have watched and stood over the shoulder of the surgeon in numerous open heart procedures with no problems. Just don't eat right before you walk in you might send it back up.
  13. This isn't the first time you have ragged on the OP in this forum, take your own advice.
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