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Sed

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  1. That's my thought. You can always renegotiate after a year or two, especially if you become Chief.
  2. Take it. Sounds like a great gig with room for growth and autonomy.
  3. PA Lastname gets a lot of weird looks and, "Huh?" so I stick with my first name, wear my badge, and give them my card. First name, last name and title gets a little verbose with those drugged up post-op patients, so simple has worked best. I do like the Master title though; I will try that next.
  4. Emedpa will have some great insight. As an ortho trauma PA myself, I'll pipe in too. There's a lot of exposure to the EM field in ortho trauma. I've known a couple PAs who go on to work in EM after getting tired of the trauma grind. If your goal is to eventually transition to EM, consider getting a per diem job in urgent care to keep up your skillset and medical knowledge.
  5. Figure out what call entails and get a general idea of call expectations. Are you doing consults or just floor call? Overall, good offer if call isn't a killer and credentialing/licencing is covered, especially with those good benefits. You didn't mention much of your actual position. What about schedule? Is this Mon-Fri or shift work? Will you get called in for cases or just assist when you're there? Any clinic duties or office call? Is all this TBD during the restructuring process? You should get an idea so you know what you're getting into. What about CME?
  6. I second what Boatswain said. Start buckling down to build an emergency fund in the event of the worse. Be careful about jumping into something else. I'm sure a lot of other things sound much better at this point, but make it a switch for the better, whatever that ends up meaning to you.
  7. Who told patients that they're "big boned"?
  8. Who told patients that fractures take 4-6 weeks to heal?
  9. I don't have any personal experience with locums, but a friend has used CompHealth for other surgical specialties for almost two years now and has had a good experience thus far. There are plenty of ortho opportunities listed on their website and apparently have even more that aren't listed if you speak to an actual recruiter. Typical assignment is 3-6 months, which is usually to cover an employee who's out, busy season, or tryout period for potential permanent placement. The online listings have the parameters outlined, including preferred start date, schedule, call, duties, etc. Some will ask to extend the assignment if they have difficulty finding coverage.
  10. When we have a very busy day, I will write down my orders during my visit and hand the sheet to the MAs. Doing so during my patient encounter also gives me a chance to recap my plan with the patient. You can also consider Skype or secure messaging, but keep it HIPAA compliant, of course.
  11. Burnout finally caught up with me too. I took some time off which really helped, and then sat down with the powers that be and got protected admin time so no more charting at home. Good luck to you and your next endeavor. Like you said, life is too short to be miserable at a job.
  12. Unfortunately, this is not how it works with nursing. It's always about going up in the chain of command. ^This. OP, you don't know what's going to come into that ED: necrotizing fasciitis, MRSA, projectile vomiting, scabies, IVDU needle, etc. The last thing you want is some easy avenue to get yourself infected or covered with nasty bodily fluids. Keep em covered, bro.
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