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MainerRD12

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About MainerRD12

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  1. It's a great program from what I know...one of my classmates did it. I rotated throughout the hospital and lifespan facilities during clinical year. They accept new grads and current PAs though there would be a preference for those in the area and those already working for lifespan. If you do the program its sort of assumed you would work for them.
  2. SOLD - sorry not sure how to delete post?
  3. $50 - worked for me! - good through January 3rd 2018
  4. I was in your boat last year during didactic, and even throughout my clinicals, but I'm a few years older than you. Now I graduate next month and cannot wait to be working and continue learning on the job and I have a lot more faith in the process. This is the hardest it will be, going forward we will only become better, and you are responsible for what kind of PA you will be. I spend a lot of time reading and studying on my own, partly because I have an exam to pass, but honestly it is mostly because I love medicine and always want to learn more. If you love it, it's enjoyable to be a nerd and will make you a better PA ;)
  5. I am in my FM rotation with a DO who precepts med students year-round but we had a cancellation in my original site and he agreed to take me. He has a private practice, just him and 2 MAs. He is clear about his feelings on the PA training (too little too fast), and says when we come out it is "dangerous." NPs he thinks are even worse. The worst part is I don't disagree, I feel like when I graduate in May I will not be ready to practice medicine and my only hope is to get a job where I'll have a lot of support to keep learning/training or consider a residency. I am doing everything I can every day to prepare and am hoping for the best - I still would choose this route vs becoming a doc when I'm 40, though I have definitely considered it.
  6. Someone at a job fair said it is smart to get a recommendation from every rotation, then you will be able to pick the best ones when job application time comes around. It sounded like a good idea at the time, but being in rotation 5 I still don't feel like I've mastered my PA skills enough for someone to write a recommendation specific for a clinical position. I'm sure they could write a general one, but is that worth asking for? Do you even provide written recommendation letters when you apply to jobs or just have your references ready? Thanks in advance, sorry if it's been addressed before!
  7. I am in my second clinical rotation. I appreciate the feeling of being completely overwhelmed and thinking I'll never know what I'm doing and what the hell were people thinking allowing somebody to be a health care provider with 2 years of training. I get so frustrated sometimes because I want to know everything now, and it just doesn't work that way. But then you see PAs working and they are badass, so we can and will get there. I will say that I thought I would have more free time 2nd year, but I have found that I spend a lot of time reading, listening to podcasts, and learning as much as possible so I don't look like an idiot ALL of the time.
  8. amwillaert has a good point - if you know what schools you are interested in, contact them directly and see what they say about WIC experience (it does make you stand out in a different way) and you would probably make a bit more $....BUT if it is medical experience you want then this wouldn't cut it. Good luck and good for you that you did some soul searching before taking a DI spot form someone else - we NEED good RDs out there for our future patients and so many people don't get the chance due to the DI shortage! :)
  9. I graduated from UMaine with the same major and if you are considering PA and not sure about RD, I would not do the internship - the year you will spend and the money you will spend getting your RD isn't worth it unless you are sure you want to be an RD. I was extremely frustrated through much of my internship because you can't just focus on clinical nutrition, it's all the foodservice stuff and projects.....so if it's medicine you are interested in I would do MA or CNA, EMT, etc. My hours as an RD did count but it depends on your experience and what schools you apply to - good luck and feel free to ask any questions you might have! I'm almost through didactic year of PA school.
  10. Do not do RD if you know you want to be a PA. It is a lot of money/time and you could do many other things to get experience. With my internship I spent months on food budgets/meal planning and other things that just were not worth any time or money if you're not sure it's what you want to do. My hours counted most places but EMT/CNA/MA/Anything but RD would be my suggestion if you are set on PA.
  11. I applied in August while I was taking one class, then took 2 more in the fall (so technically I had 3 outstanding grades), I got interviews at 2 of 4 and was accepted to 1. All it takes is 1! :) If your GPA and experience are solid, one outstanding grade and an August app date should not be an issue at (most) schools. That being said I would definitely apply to more schools than I did and contact them directly before you waste $$.
  12. So I have successfully completed 2 of 3 semesters so this question comes a bit late but..... I'm wondering how much you used notes from didactic year during clinical year and into practice. Depending on the module it can vary but most of my notes are on the lecture slides and I usually don't have the beautiful charts and gloriously organized notes like some classmates. We've all done similar with our grades so if I started to make a great effort to do this it would only be to help me later on (clinical year mostly). I could also go back and try to organize some old notes (in all my spare time) if it would really help. Thoughts?
  13. I heard yesterday there are about 7 seats left (this could increase as people are accepted then have one month to put down deposit, so they choose another school then another seat becomes open). I interviewed in January with 8 open seats then we have at least a few people in our class who interviewed in March and were accepted then for June 1st start. Not too late if you are a strong candidate - good luck!
  14. I looked through the articles that were cited and they just go in circles citing other RCTs but it's hard to find actual studies - I did find one was 45 years ago in Canada, and another was diabetes care from a nurse specialized in diabetes (NSD) in the Netherlands which is literally not even a thing in the US. I did find a decent articlle that they cited as having higher patient satisfaction with NPs. However this is a direct quote "Of the patients who consulted a general practitioner, 73% (364) stated that they would consult a general practitioner for a similar illness in the future and only 8% (38) indicated that they would consult a nurse (table 5). Of those who saw a nurse practitioner, 48% (211) stated they would consult a general practitioner next time and 32% (139) that they would consult a nurse." Soooo I'm no expert but personally I wouldn't use that information to support patient satisfaction with NPs?
  15. That was the kind of question I would have asked prior to entering school but trust me, none of us can remotely prepare you because your background, your personality, the program you choose, your professors, everything will be different and there is no way to know until you're in it. In the summer I studied an hour or 2 each night, quite a bit on the weekends, and crammed more before exams. The days were much shorter. Now we do one exam every Friday, including everything from that module, and I study pretty much all the time including most lunches. Friday definitely not. You cannot get behind. It does help to have a good background in healthcare but there is just so much to learn, things you never even knew possibly existed beyond "normal" medicine, so you just have to roll with it. It's only temporary. That being said, if you really are one of those people that retains everything said for 8 hours per day (on average 400 slides of info on ppt per day for my program), you could swing a shift here and there.
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