Jump to content

Kaepora

Members
  • Content Count

    235
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Kaepora last won the day on January 1

Kaepora had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

160 Excellent

About Kaepora

  • Rank
    Registered

Profile

  • Profession
    Other

Recent Profile Visitors

514 profile views
  1. Kaepora

    Verbal offer

    For psych!? No way. For APRNs that is the highest paid specialty, behind anesthesia. I would say $120 yearly minimum from the NPs I know in psych.
  2. Yes, absolutely. I kept track of all bedside procedures and surgical cases as a student, and I still keep track of them. Don't you have to log this information as a student anyways?
  3. This path has crossed my mind a couple of times... I would have to move to a different area though, as I don't see how I could make this combo work in the medical environment in my area. Like I said, CRNAs are really tightly controlled here. Plus, I like my current specialty and role as a NP. I am well respected and trusted by my colleagues, APP and physician alike. My salary is decent (for the area) and I enjoy quite a lot of autonomy. I think this is end game.
  4. This was a 3 year program, so 1 year of didactics alone, then clinical began while didactics continued. So the didactic portion was considered part-time, but the clinical portion was considered full-time. I've detailed the clinical work-load elsewhere on this forum. For medicine rotations, contact hours were counted by patient encounters which were counted by writing a note. And for surgical rotations we had a minimum hour requirement that was counted from "cut to close". It was stringent. Some of us still worked - I continued to hold a casual position picking up a shift or 2 a month on weekends, and then when we had a week off between quarters. I will readily admit that the minimum requirements for PA programs set by ARC-PA far exceeds the minimum requirements for NP programs set by CCNE. But there are NP programs out there that are doing it right. And for what it's worth, as I've stated elsewhere here, there is a large grass roots movement among NPs to increase the CCNE's standards and close diploma mills. Slowly but surely.
  5. Kaepora

    Not-So-Glorified Shadowing?

    I was always really up front with my preceptors. My school had strict requirements about patient encounters and writing notes so I told them on day one that I needed to have my own assignment, I would see the patient, I would report back to them, I would write the notes, etc. They were all on board. If you show initiative and prove that you know what you're doing without being annoying, preceptors usually get you more involved. Read. Study. Come in and tell me what you read about last night and how it is applicable to our patients. When I get a call from the ED, offer to go do the consult/admission. Ask me pertinent questions. Make suggestions. If you are feeling underwhelmed with the tasks you are being given, ask for another. If I assign you 2 patients and you want 3, say so. When I have students, the first week is generally a trial where they need to prove to me that I can rely on them to do a H&P/consult/SOAP encounter going forward, without me breathing down their neck. If they can't answer a good number of my questions, or if they can't gather appropriate information during an interview, or if they appear unenthused, then they tend to be side lined.
  6. Honestly, the salary is the only reason I considered it for so long. In my neck of the woods NP/PAs are paid sh*t, so the difference between CRNA and NP is that much more exaggerated. But, I was tired of being a nurse, and, honestly, CRNA is just nursing 2.0. And again, in my area, anesthesiologists are present on induction and emergence and they do all invasive procedures and lines. I have way more autonomy and use my brain much more as a NP, really in almost any specialty, than the CRNAs. But don't ever say that to them... haha.
  7. I should also add, I did an ABSN program. At the time I thought I wanted to do CRNA (until I worked as a RN with CRNAs... boooooring). Working as a RN will give you valuable experience and insight into health care professions. I always recommend pursuing a BSN (or paramedic or RT - other "health care" jobs such as CNA, scribe, etc are low yield IMO) prior to deciding on a "provider level" career. I tend to think being an RN is the best as the knowledge and experience gained is highly applicable to any career path, plus, you have the option of pursuing any career path - MD/DO, PA, NP, CRNA, CNM, etc. No other option (i.e. paramedic, RT) will afford you these choices.
  8. Haha, I would think that this would be a given. Imagine coming here and saying the reverse. Know your audience. Haha.
  9. Kaepora

    IR PA job with minimal radiation exposure?

    I used to work in IR. The cases the APPs do in my system are not heavy on radiation. Things like angios, nephrostomy tubes, kyphos, UFEs and other embos, etc, are all done by the radiologists. The APPs do tunneled and non tunneled CVCs (hickman's, implanted ports, dialysis caths), joint injections (ESI, NRI, SI, large joints), tube exchanges, myelograms/LPs, etc, using fluoro. Otherwise, a big chunk of the procedures done are with US guidance - liver biopsies, *tons* of paras/thoras. But you use appropriate shielding and maximize distance and minimize timing when appropriate and you are relatively safe. Every system has a radiation safety officer to keep track of your film badges and rad exposure as well. I wouldn't let this be a deterrent.
  10. The tutorial from UVA looks great. Some of these modules would be great for on boarding our new APPs... and I'll make my students do some of these as well.
  11. First of all, nothing to disclose. Pretty obvious I'm an NP. Not trying to hide it. Second, I don't know why some people always turn this into a d*ck measuring contest. All PAs are far superior to NPs. Uh huh, mmmmk. I'll agree with that for FNPs only. PMH, CNMs, CRNA, AC, Ped, etc are better trained in their specific specialty focus. Sorry not sorry. As an ACNP I got 6 months of IM/Hospitalist, 6 months ICU, 11 months surgery, etc. There is no PA program that comes close. And I am vocally against the DNP. I am against any health care "doctorate" degree. We are throwing money down the drain. What hospital do you work at? I would like a union that guaranteed me a job...
  12. Kaepora

    Internal Medicine podcast

    I subscribe to curbsiders. It's awesome. If it's a topic that isn't terribly interesting to you, or you feel you know well enough, they give you quick clinical pearls you can glance over. They also give a pdf copy of the content. I like to read it myself, as that helps me internalize the content better than listening.
  13. I just don't get it though. There are already 3 year medical schools. Just do that. Or add 1 more year and become a physician with greatly increased earning power, respect, etc. But it looks like it's 28 months? So not really any longer than your typical PA program. Most of my NP colleagues do not support the DNP. I do not support it. The academic, bourgeoisie NPs are trying to force it upon us working-class, proletariat NPs. Note, however, how they keep pushing the roll out date back year after year. We should take PTs, pharmacists, etc as an example. Their salaries did not increase. Their scope of practice did not increase. They have more debt, but for what?
  14. In front of patients I always address them as Dr. ___. When not in front of patients - it depends. Some I call by their first name, usually those I work closely with or with whom I am friends. The ones who demand it, well, I oblige, but try to avoid them at every opportunity because they are generally not well liked over all.
  15. Kaepora

    North Dakota Closer to OTP

    You're correct. Nurse Midwives are licensed and have prescriptive authority in 50 states plus DoC and US territories. Certified midwives (not nurses) are licensed in Delaware, Maine, New Jersey, New York and Rhode Island and have prescriptive authority in New York, Rhode Island and Maine.
×

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More