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Maryness

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About Maryness

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    Physician Assistant
  1. Study the blueprints as a guide to know what is considered fair game on the test and know the DSM-5 criteria. Those got me every time!
  2. My recommendation is to find a select 1-3 books and stick to those for studying. When you have so many books to study from, it becomes stressful and you lose focus and feel like you "have to know everything." A lot of the books present the same information in different ways. Find a book that you like and makes sense to you and stick to it. My favorites from PA school was: A Comprehensive Review for the Certification and Recertification Examinations for Physician Assistants Step up to Medicine First Aid USMLE Step 2 CK (Clinical Knowledge) The first book is my favorite, it's concise and not a big bulky book. What I did during rotations was read from various books and then consolidated my information into one book so that as my exams got closer, I only had to really study one book. Definitely use the blueprints as a guide because anything on the blueprints is fairgame for the test. There were a hand full of times I recall that a question that was on the EOR blue print showed up on a test but it wasn't anywhere in my prep books.
  3. My recommendation is to find a select 1-3 books and stick to those for studying. When you have so many books to study from, it becomes stressful and you lose focus and feel like you "have to know everything." A lot of the books present the same information in different ways. Find a book that you like and makes sense to you and stick to it. My favorites from PA school was: A Comprehensive Review for the Certification and Recertification Examinations for Physician Assistants Step up to Medicine First Aid USMLE Step 2 CK (Clinical Knowledge) The first book is my favorite, it's concise and not a big bulky book. What I did during rotations was read from various books and then consolidated my information into one book so that as my exams got closer, I only had to really study one book.
  4. My recommendation is to find a select 1-3 books and stick to those for studying. When you have so many books to study from, it becomes stressful and you lose focus. My favorites from PA school was: A Comprehensive Review for the Certification and Recertification Examinations for Physician Assistants Step up to Medicine First Aid USMLE Step 2 CK (Clinical Knowledge)
  5. PA school is getting more and more competitive and it is often difficult getting into a program to begin with. Focus on getting in first and then think about jobs later. I advise to apply to many programs (within reason) and go wherever you are accepted, even if it out of state or not your ideal program. To answer your question, I don't think it would be difficult to go to school in a different state and then apply to jobs in your home state. I have friends from college who went to out of state programs and had no issue findings jobs afterwards. When you finish the program, instead of applying for licensure in the state you graduated in, just apply to where you want to practice in.
  6. I have many students that shadow me and definitely can give advice. My tips and pet peeves: 1. Be concise and succinct with emails and pay attention to what we say. I have a pre-typed lengthy email that I copy to all my students that includes a list of all required documents, clinic addresses, available days and times to shadow etc... I get so many students that will email me the day prior to the day they shadow asking for the address or not following instructions. Students, we are busy people and if excessive emails can be avoided, it is appreciated! (This is probably because I have 30+ pre-PA students on rotation that shadow me and constantly get bombarded with emails requesting for shadowing so throughout the years I have gotten annoyed haha) 2. Be interactive but use common sense to know when it's the appropriate time to ask questions and when it's excessive. When students ask me a ton of back to back questions that require lengthy answers, it puts me behind and often times I don't get to chart, put in orders, return patient calls, etc... 3. Come prepared with questions. I have some students who literally are like a fly on the wall and that's fine but it doesn't make you memorable to me so if a student comes back later and asks me for a rec letter and I don't remember you, that's not a good thing. 4. Please dress professionally. I require my students to either wear business professional or scrubs. I've had students show up in leggings or rompers and that is not okay. My personal opinion.. Great observer - interactive, asks follow up questions to what I am explaining/teaching, shows that they are gracious for my time Okay observer - fly on the wall, asks very little questions, not memorable Bad observer - comes late, not prepared with questions, seems disinterested and on their phone or constantly looking at their watch (gives me impression that you are just there for "hours" and not to learn)
  7. If you are still interested in shadowing, feel free to email me. I am a PA in orthopedic spine surgery in Houston. Mary Vuong, MPAS, PA-C SASpine www.saspine.com Orthopedic Spine Surgery mvuong@saspine.com
  8. I recommend LinkdIn, PASO (https://pashadowonline.com/), and traditional researching online of clinics and looking under their list of providers to see if there is a PA and then going in person with your resume and letter requesting to shadow. Your best bet are family practice/internal medicine clinics as they usually are private practice and not affiliated with a hospital that would require credentialing or lots of paperwork to shadow. Emailing can only get you so far and requires minimal effort. I once had a student physically come into my clinic with her resume in hand and a separate formal letter requesting to shadow me. This definitely was the most impressive to me that she put in the extra effort. I ended up writing her a rec letter because she was a fantastic student and now she is starting PA school in the fall.
  9. @JustPassing, my GRE was 152 verbal and 149 quant. and 4.0 on analytical Just proves you can have mediocre gre scores and still get in!
  10. Hi Everyone, Just thought I would give some info since I just got accepted. I submitted my CASPA 6/11/2012 and got an interview invitation on 6/26 for the July 18/19 group. I received my acceptance e-mail on July 23. My caspa gpa is 3.54 I had 710 patient care experience, an ortho PA internship of 150hrs, about 100 hrs of shadowing, 350hrs of volunteer. The interview session was such a great experience. I really love the faculty. The interview is "behavioral" meaning that instead of asking you hypothetical questions they ask you questions based on past experiences. I had interview questions such as what do i consider my biggest mistake and do i regret it, describe an interpersonal conflict and how did i resolve it, knowing that this is a rigorous program what do i plan to do for fun.....questions like that. If you google it you should find plenty of practice questions. I hope that helps some of you guys. If you have any questions feel free to ask!
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