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narcan

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narcan last won the day on February 17

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About narcan

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  1. Agree with ohio; I'm careful not to pick up complex patients near the end of my shift. Also, you should look into whether you can finish your charting from home via VPN. It's a lot nicer to finish those charts in your own environment with a cold beer than being stuck at the hospital under fluorescent lights.
  2. I did speak to my state chapter the other day and was basically told, "well it's a private organization, so we can't do anything". What they did offer to do was generate language to take to administration to ease their burden in changing the bylaws. I'm still waiting to get a copy of the actual bylaws, so I can see for myself what's fact and what's not and go from there.
  3. Yes, it gets even more ridiculous. I'm pretty tempted to contact this company to see what their angle is and how much they're paying as they also hire untrained scribes (i.e. premed students). Still, perhaps a reflection of how tough the job market is actually getting out there. https://www.indeed.com/viewjob?jk=aa675f934f00c1d7&tk=1dbrik24t0mt7000&from=company_2pane
  4. Does anyone have any experience with getting an employer or agency to convert you from a W2 employee to a 1099 employee, so you can take advantage of some of the tax benefits of self-employment? It's a bit confusing that if you're 1099, you can deduct a large number of expenses but as a W2 you cannot, it seems.
  5. There are some PAs inpatient, mostly in ortho and CT surgery. This is in Virginia, where NPs do now have autonomy starting next year if they have 5 years experience and some other criteria, but I think this is unique to this hospital system's bylaws, and I'm not sure the problem yet, except that perhaps the leadership team is looking out for their own. More to follow.
  6. If you know what area you want to go into, I'd recommend looking at a residency too. It's a tough market out there for new grads.
  7. I've been discussing a new critical care position with a CMG that is taking over for a private group at a mid-sized hospital in my area. They posted the job as NP or PA and I had a great phone interview with the regional medical director and have been keeping in touch with the recruiter over the past few weeks as they schedule interviews for the site director prior to conducting APP interviews. I received an email yesterday that the hospital bylaws "make it nearly impossible" for PAs to practice in the ICU, as in they would need orders cosigned before they would be active, would not be able to do invasive procedures, and that these restrictions somehow don't apply to NPs. I know there are PAs working in the hospital, specifically in ortho and cardiac surgery, but it is a nurse and NP heavy institution. I've reached out to my state organization to see if they have any guidance on this, but in the meantime, no interviews with PAs are being scheduled. I'm not sure there's any other recourse for me, but I wanted to throw it out to the group and see if others have had similar experiences. I've heard of hospitals being regressive on both NPs and PAs but I've never encountered an institution that specifically favored one over the other in terms of autonomy and credentialing.
  8. There's nothing wrong with the concept, although their price list is somewhat interesting. $325 for an MRI but $650 for an STD test (nucleic acid amplified). I think we'd all care less if they didn't intentionally exclude NPs and PAs. But we should also use this opportunity to examine the other side: there are a lot of docs who don't like working with us, not because we're not good clinicians or don't ease their workload, but because they don't like cosigning charts and taking on liability on patients they didn't see because the corporate overlords make them.
  9. Marino: ICU Book Owens: Ventilator Book Farkas: Internet Book of Critical Care (www.pulmcrit.org)
  10. Wow...definitely didn't read that closely. My mistake. Deleting out of shame. Then I say go for it. You'll learn plenty on the job. EM:RAP is a good podcast. Bouncebacks is a great book. Know what you don't know.
  11. Can you be more specific? Changing your pay and/or responsibilities is a lot different than not paying for parking or changing access to the physician lounge. Like others have said, would definitely talk to an attorney regarding your obligations and if this truly was breach of contract. You don't burn bridges by supporting your immediate supervisor and co-workers. That means not leaving them out to dry generally, so working for 3 months past giving notice if that's the standard. You're going to want/need references from these people.
  12. Is your end goal to be a physician or to be a physician in the military? In either case, not sure why'd you try to go to PA school first.
  13. I view a "good" raise as 10-15% and a great raise as 15-25%, so somewhere in there would be an off-the-cuff answer. But if you have friends in the same organization who are also in an adminstrative role, consider asking them how their compensation changed. You can also ask for comp-time to be built-in, so additional hours you work covering providers who are sick or doing extra admin work outside of 40 hours generates PTO for you somehow.
  14. The larger the organization, the less strongly I would feel about it, i.e. an academic center probably is complying with all regulations and they're not likely to adjust the contract anyway. Small groups or private practices definitely need to be looked at by an attorney.
  15. The advantage to low volume is that the docs actually have time to teach. If you're constantly just trying to keep your heads above water seeing everyone coming through the door, you'll inevitably end up seeing what you're comfortable seeing, i.e. the low acuity patients, and the docs won't have time to help you learn procedures, talk through cases, etc.
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