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treejay

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About treejay

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. Definitely negotiate. I can't imagine a job offer being revoked after asking for health insurance, or for asking for a higher salary since health insurance isn't provided. Heck, the health insurance system in the United States is virtually setup to be employer provided. Hard to think of many working professionals who don't have insurance provided by their employer. It's standard practice and if you're not provided it, you should ask to be compensated accordingly. And I would recommend going on your state health insurance page to determine how much that would cost you.
  2. I would never work for a place where 60-70 patients/day is the norm. And I would never want to be a patient at a place like that either. Just my personal opinion.
  3. Crucial to mention how many shifts per year you will be working otherwise salary is much less useful of a number. Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
  4. What does the AAPA salary report say for your region for a new/recent grad PA practicing in hospital medicine?
  5. While this is really mere semantics, I generally disagree. One should got into practice on day 1 with competence. I'm not suggesting anybody will go into practice day 1 seasoned and knowing much of their medical specialty knowledge set. But competent in that you know your limits, and know what to do when you don't know something related to patient care. You know when things are more urgent, even if you don't know exactly how to manage it, you know where to go to have the job done. I mean, I don't think it's OK to be practicing in an incompetent state. A green provider is one thing. T
  6. I recommend getting a good PA job. You aren't even guaranteed to get a spot in a residency. They aren't as competitive as PA school, but they're not a shoo-in either....
  7. Since he/she didn't have an occurence policy at their old job, can't they just pickup a tail coverage for the 4 months they were there? I was under the impression that this is possible after you left a job..... Because tail coverage is insurance against encounters that already happened.......
  8. why the change in language from FPAR to OTM? What are the implications of this change ?
  9. I would have gone if it were in an interesting place to visit. Vegas sux
  10. I have applied and gotten interviews at jobs posting for NPs only. I recommend applying to any and all of them.
  11. nah. The type of care that is delivered at a primary clinic and ER differ. The most obvious example being annual preventative visits. Those account for a lot of daily visits in a primary care clinic. Those will go away as those patients become uninsured and they will present to the ER only for their acute complaints. ER doesn't provivide "preventative care" in the sense of pap smears, routine screening labs, bone density scans, other routine screenings and immunizations on a general level. of course there are specific exceptions but we're not discussing exceptions. The ER is there
  12. Disagree. Sure there will be a shift to those places, but the number of patient visits overall will decline with a decline in the # insured.
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