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kyoung1

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  1. cbull, I think you need to look at how the program's curriculum is set up and do they make up for the shortcoming from whichever model they use for anatomy as you are correct, there are pro's and con's for each. The advantage of the anatomy tables is that you are spending ALL of your time at the table doing structure identification. With a cadaver you spend about 1/2 the time doing dissection and the other 1/2 at structure identification. However, with a cadaver, you get the dissection skills which are helpful in surgery. Does the program with anatomy tables spend any time with surgical skills you may be missing out on? Does the program with cadavers give you enough time and guidance to do dissection properly? Also, I think the word you are looking for with regard to the new program is provisional... that is the term for new programs. Probation is for programs that may not be meeting the standards. Good luck with whatever you choose.
  2. Might be interesting to give it a try and see what gets stirred up.
  3. While I agree that it may not be a huge issue, I can guarantee that is was noticed, albeit a minor faux pas. While there are many things that go into admission decisions, consider your professional demeanor for the entire interview process and not just one solitary encounter.
  4. St. Bonaventure University - Olean, NY
  5. UGoLong is right. The number of credits doesn't tell the whole story. I recently set up a PA program and decided to give the appropriate number of credit-hours for the time that was spent both in and out of class (Carnegie units). It ended up being 122 credit-hours for the program. Which is a lot, but it isn't any more time in the classroom than many other programs. There are many regulatory agencies that influence how credit-hours are awarded (state education dept & accreditation agencies). If you spend the time, you should get credit for what you do. This didn't change the cost of the program, but it did allow for a better faculty:student ratio which is also important. So in answer to the OP's original question. There is no set number of credits to graduate from PA school. You just need to do the program as it is set up and then graduate. My advice would be to look at the whole program curriculum/cost/rotations to see what best fits your needs.
  6. Does the physician own the practice? In rural areas they may not be making the money like you think. I had a similar situation where I got laid off due to downsizing a group practice and found a job with a physician but needed to take a cut in pay. The physician and I hit it off and practiced similarly. It was the best working relationship I've ever had. While I took the cut in pay because I needed a job, I also kept track of the financials of the practice. There were some periods of time I made more money than the physician because in a rural area and dealing with insurance companies can be financially unstable for the practice. If the physician is really looking for a long-term relationship they should be willing to renegotiate when things are more financially stable.
  7. You state that the money isn't a concern, but if it will stress you to spend that much more then, it really is a concern. If you can put that concern aside, which program will allow you to flourish? This will be one of the most stressful times, which program will give you the support you need to succeed? Sometimes it isn't just about the facts and numbers. You will need a place to be comfortable when you are most vulnerable mentally.
  8. Your additional degrees certainly makes you more marketable compared to other new grads. However, unless you can use those degrees to create income for the employer beyond what other new grads could bring in, it may be difficult to justify a higher salary. I suppose that depends on the job you are looking at. If you can prove your worth you would have more leverage in negotiating. It may take some creative marketing on your part.
  9. I think that some of the programs decision regarding deferment is financially driven by the institution. Accreditation standards only allow a certain number of students per cohort. If there are 50 seats in the program and your deferment brings them to 49 will they want to go to 51 the following year. They can't unless you first matriculate (at what point are you considered matriculated) and then decelerate (for medical reasons). It would be less of an issue if they budget for some attrition and include you in the next cohort numbers. You may need to show up to class on the first day and then take a medical leave.
  10. It depends on why you are doing the test... what information you want to get from the test? If it is because of symptoms you can give the albuterol to see if the patient gets relief and then document the symptoms, the numbers may not or may not change. If it's because they have a history of asthma you may still get normal PFT results because asthma is episodic and reversible so they may not be having a problem currently
  11. The are really two answers to the question. If you are really asking if it's possible with shadowing and/or volunteer hours then the answer is yet there are some programs that it is possible to gain entry, however, your choices will be limited. If you want the best chance to get in and more choices then compensated patient contact would be best. Most programs require 1000 hours or less. Some programs look at quantity and quality of the health care experience. Really the best answer is to look at the admission requirements for programs you would want to go to and see what their specific requirements are. This is an area that has many variations and is program dependent.
  12. Clarkson University http://clarkson.edu/pa/ NEW YORK
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