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cbrsmurf

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cbrsmurf last won the day on August 14 2015

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About cbrsmurf

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  1. Totally independent unless I ask for help/advice or sending for surgery. CA requires a certain percentage of notes be sent to physician to review, so I do that.
  2. Why is this such big news when we have a sitting president that is a moderate anti-vaxxer? There are crazies in both ends of the spectrum (looking at you hippies in Oregon). Fortunately, a new large study was recently released to further shore up arguments against the supposed link between autism and MMR. https://annals.org/aim/fullarticle/2727726/measles-mumps-rubella-vaccination-autism-nationwide-cohort-study
  3. Eye know of one, personally. He does intravitreous injections and gets paid handsomely for it.
  4. From what the original poster described, she would not be categorized as having a hypertensive emergency.
  5. I know everyone is tired of naturopaths and all that, but serious question: does this warrant a neuro assessment, brain imaging, or screening for dementia in this possibly delusional patient?
  6. To answer OP's original question, there are no loans with no PMI <20% down payment like they offer for physicians at least in Southern California. I have not heard of any other PA's getting any other special loans when purchasing their homes either. Another factor when considering buying a new home is the recent tax bill changes. Depending on what state you are in, property taxes and home value can be a big factor as well.
  7. Regarding your situation, I would not have performed the procedure even with an AMA. Say he claims that he can't get erect or heaven forbid you actually did some damage, you would be at risk for a reasonable malpractice suit.
  8. There isn't a definition yet of what is "passing" right?
  9. Wow, so they give you the answers right when you finish? That's nice.
  10. Good analysis. First off, people don't "deserve" anything other than some respect as long as you are respectful of other people. If the practice wants a PA to waste time with prior auths or mop the floors, well they are going to lose money. You have to decide if this is the type of work you want to do. Obviously you should factor in financial factors such as whether you are paid hourly, salary, or receive bonuses.
  11. Probably an unpopular opinion, but how good of a PA you become really depends on your on-the-job training. You could be an amazing PA student with a lot of prior HCE, but if you don't have someone teach you the in's and out's of the specialty, work life can be very difficult.
  12. Oncology is not an easily specialty, just to forewarn you. *You can be dealing with very sick patients. *Surveillance varies between different type of cancers. *Treatment is different for each type of cancer and at different stages. Oncology has the most new drugs that have come out in the last decades. They all have different side effect profiles. *You need to know your anatomy and pathophysiology as malignancies can affect multiple systems, adjacent structures, and lymph drainage patterns. *Trials are continuously ongoing for various cancers. The oncologist will likely be the ones handling this, but patients will still ask you. *You will be prescribing a lot pain medication. *The hematology portion is actually easier. Just my opinion
  13. That is what I have heard, regarding treatment of PA's. From what I hear, it depends on specialty and region. Fortunately the PA's in my department are given both a lot of autonomy and support. on the other hand, some primary care PA's/NP's don't even have MA's and have to room their own patients!
  14. Work ENT in Southern California for Kaiser Permanente (huge medical group present in the West Coast). PA's here are unionized with the nursing union, so pay is the same across the board for all NP/PA's (with the exception of PA I and PA II levels). Pay goes in steps/years working, and is hourly. Doesn't matter what if you are primary care or specialty. In Southern California, new grad NP/PA I's start at $65/hr with excellent benefits and vested in pension after 5 years. PA I's with ~20 years experience top at around $85/hr, I believe. PA II's average about $5-10 more an hour. CoL is high in California.
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