Jump to content

Navy_PA

Members
  • Content Count

    9
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

13 Good

About Navy_PA

  • Rank
    Registered

Profile

  • Profession
    Physician Assistant

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Could put you in touch with someone who is in the program now if that would be helpful since our Navy GenSurg PA fellowship is colocated. Email me if interested. Ari
  2. Congrats on your acceptance into PA school (was it Texas Tech?) - that's a significant accomplishment. Really glad to hear that you have an interest in serving our nation as a PA. Per your question, I won't speak too much to pros or cons of one service vs another, but can at least speak to how it went for me going from a civilian PA program into the Navy on a (HPSP) scholarship: I thought about where I wanted to live and work (beach), what specialty I wanted to practice in (emergency med or orthopedics), what types of patients I wanted to take care of (not the type I was seeing on my ambulance). I determined the military was where I would rather be, so I looked at the different services. Navy looked best. So I called a Navy recruiter. This person didn't seem to know what they were talking about. So I called a Navy medical recruiter. That person was very helpful and guided me through the process. Essentially, the Navy would only pay for 24 months of school, so I set things up for me to Commission (not enlist) as an officer 3 months in to my 27-month PA program. Filled out all the paperwork (lots of it). Started PA school and let the school's registrar know that 3 months later the Navy would be picking up the rest of the bill. 3 months into school, I raised my right hand and was sworn in as an Ensign in the Navy Reserves. The day of graduation, I promoted from an Ensign to a Lieutenant Junior Grade. I was required to pass my PANCE before I could go to officer development school (boot camp for officers). On the day I started ODS I became Active Duty (vs reserve). Finished those 5 easy weeks in Rhode Island, and drove from ODS to my first duty station (Chicago) where I started practicing as a PA immediately, and stayed to work 3 years. After that I moved to my next duty station (Coastal North Carolina) with Marine Corps Special Operations, and then after that 3.5 years in the White House in Washington, DC directly providing health care to two different presidential administrations. In that time, I've deployed only once for 6 months to Afghanistan. Was a truly rewarding experience and I've been trying to get back since (see April 2012 JAAPA for my typical day out there). I've gotten to travel a good deal with the military (Afghanistan, Germany, Switzerland, Spain, Greece, Morocco, New Zealand, Japan, Laos, Vietnam, Singapore, etc). I viewed the initial 3-year service obligation less as an unwanted commitment and more as a guaranteed first PA job. Clearly I've stayed beyond that time period. The longer one stays in the Navy as a PA, the more the job includes leadership responsibilities and administrative work. This is a great opportunity. There are also expanded clinical opportunities. For example, I recently began an 18-month doctoral fellowship for PAs in trauma surgery and critical care at an Army hospital which is a level one trauma center in Texas. Similar fellowships exist in the Navy for emergency medicine, orthopedics, and flight medicine. I still work for the Navy because I appreciate working for something bigger than myself or some investors' bottom line. The US still does a great deal of good in the world and I can believe in supporting it even though political winds or the zeitgeist may change. There is a great deal of camaraderie around this. On a more practical dad-to-day basis, I really like my patients. One can't ask for a better patient population. Really enjoy taking care of our Marines and Sailors and their families. Just another plug: Navy bases are on beaches. Hopefully that helps. R/ Ari
  3. Navy_PA

    USMM Marine PA

    Will be very interested to see if this enables overseas (or on-the-seas ) volunteerism. Nice work. Keep us posted!
  4. A good number of SOs have gone to PA school. See, just as one example, the book "Battle Ready" by Mark Donald. A good read/listen, IMO. Becoming a SEAL will not, in itself, be a barrier for you should you wish to pursue PA-C. However, obtaining prerequisite coursework and shadowing hours, and then submitting a competitive application package for IPAP (or any another PA program) may be difficult depending on how much downtime you find to commit to coursework, be it on-line or brick-and-mortar. You may have that prerequisite coursework already, confer any of the "get into PA school" books for a standard list of what's required, and the IPAP info for their list as well. IPAP vs a civilian PA program would be another discussion and has been treated elsewhere, but may be worthy of consideration as you will already possess an undergraduate degree. I am neither a SEAL nor a prior SARC. However, in my observations there has been for the recent past an effort for NSW to make/train their own medics instead of prior SARC/SOIDC pathway. For the SARC/SOIDC pathway, SOIDC is the longer course and would be preferable as SARCs have often had to go back to either re-do the course to become SOIDCs or take the remaining coursework to plus up (this has gone back and forth as to whether to repeat vs plus up and whether to just send sailors for full SOIDC instead of SARC if the thought is they may need it in future anyway -- operational and staffing demands at that moment largely dictate). I admit that I do not know the current status of above, so may be best to ask around SOs or SARCs that you know. Other members here can also speak to whether SOCM training or other military schools are beneficial in the IPAP application package. For the civilian side, should that route end up being more convenient or timely, I believe that there is also at least on university PA program (in North Carolina?) which gives some college credits for the SARC and SOIDC coursework in view of PA-school. Moreover, the SOCM education and the subsequent military training will likely be a plus on a PA school application. The attendant life experiences are likely to be contributory if you land an interview at a PA program, as they take this into consideration for purposes of building out a class with a diversity of experiences. My $0.02 Ari
  5. I commissioned with an MPAS and another previous Master's degree as an O-2. Would be interesting to hear what you're able to work out.
  6. Navy_PA

    Navy HSCP Detailer

    We are well advised to be proactive about our career management - and this includes discussing duty stations with the detailer. The typical rule of thumb is to reach out to them 12 months in advance (don't wait for them to reach out). They will want to know each PA's preferences as it is best when the PA gets what they want and the Navy gets happier PAs and families. That said, there are some times when one just has to go where the Navy needs them... Just remember -- almost all our bases are on beaches and we have a great patient population. So even the less desirable bases have their positive aspects!
  7. If it helps, we just posted a list of acceptable pre-reqs for IPAP on our site at https://navypa.com/students Here's a direct link to the document: https://navypa.com/images/documents/Navy-IPAP-PreReq-Evaluation-Guidelines.pdf
  8. Here are Chica724's clinical buzzwords as online flashcards Study table about Stack #434546 and I've attached them as printable flashcards (just print this pdf double-sided so they match up front-to-back and then you can cut out the flashcards) [ATTACH]686[/ATTACH] Thanks Chica Flashcards of Clinical Buzzwords.pdf
  9. Here the links are collated in a word doc if anyone's interested attached[ATTACH]486[/ATTACH] Useful PA School Links.doc
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

Welcome to the Physician Assistant Forum! This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Learn More