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turnedintoamartian

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About turnedintoamartian

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    Physician Assistant

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  1. Midwest. two major health systems as employers. 1st gives 3500 and 5 days CME. Licensing and all come from that fund. 2nd is 2250 with 10 days CME, licensing and required are separate. No changes for PAs based upon specialty, just across the board.
  2. If nearly all the employers in the area include a non compete it becomes difficult to have other options available. Physicians in my area experience the same issues.
  3. I’m in the same state. I’ll look into a review, thanks.
  4. In my area the hospital systems (like most other areas) effectively own all primary care practices. Broadly speaking there are two competing systems. My current employer has a non-compete specific to the specialty within a mileage radius from current location for two years BUT it is not in effect if you are let go/terminated. I’m entertaining an offer from a competitor (different specialty) that simply bars you from practice with any other employer for 2 years and a certain mile radius. It states “any reason” regarding the end of your employment. My question is not about the legality but what other PA’s are facing in regards to this. I really want to take this other position but that non-compete is severe. What’s everyone else dealing with?
  5. It was my post I think. I’m switching to outpatient IM. I’ve used my CME to pickup Symptoms to Diagnosis to refresh my differentials regarding complaints. Also grabbed CURRENT as a review source and often use UpToDate. Otherwise I’m reviewing prevention guidelines and vaccine schedules for adults. Ive actually printed the PANCE topic list to make sure I can identify the basics of each disease and then combine that with differentials and approach to a complaint. Let me know if you come up with other ways to review.
  6. Of course a free standing ER would be going this route.
  7. I think it’s become more common for PA programs to require nearly the same science background as med school. Every program I looked at (including where I eventually attended) required biochem and usually to take bio you need organic. We need parity with NP’s but I’m not sure on the path there.
  8. Thanks for the replies including the warnings. You didn’t scare me off yet
  9. I’ve got to echo mgriffiths as well and note every peer to peer I’ve done has been approved. It’s well known in my practice that it’s going to get approved but it’s a giant time suck. More time is spent on hold than conversation...
  10. I went to PA school with an interest in family medicine, prehospital prior experience. When I graduate in 2017 the offer I got was for Uro locally and a few primary care gigs at a nearby city. I took the Uro gig due to location and decent offer for pay/benefits. The group is great as a whole but I’m not exactly passionate about the specialty and have constantly looked into primary care jobs since I took. That fact alone makes me think I should switch. Any recommendations regarding the transition to a primary care field from specialty practice? Thanks
  11. I’ll bite. I’ve had the opportunity to mix inpatient consult/rounding with outpatient clinic time at my practice but opted for pure outpatient for the time being due to schedule preferences. There is the hope for surgical assisting in the future but nothing concrete. The issue is the surgeons would prefer a uro PA for assists but don’t want to train due to the loss in productivity and therefore salary. Initially told APPs would do Saturday rounds for either half or full day but that was tabled as we wanted to day off during the week in return and that reduces patient access in the clinic. Procedures are limited. Difficult caths, intercavernosal injections, some testosterone injections, and soon will start spermatic cord blocks. May do more outpatient procedures in the future as urologists are hard to come by and wanting to maximize their time in the OR while there are more of us APPs than they’ve ever had.
  12. Doesn’t appear to be blinded and no placebo. Add in the noted sample size along with 2 and 4 week follow up end points with symptoms as only outcomes measured and this leaves a lot to be desired. I was surprised to see in their conclusion that they recommend this as a treatment based mostly on this weak study but then I saw it was an open access Chinese medicine journal and it was less surprising.
  13. My degree is Master of a science in medicine. This seems to be an outlier as nearly all others are the MPAS or MMS.
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