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turnedintoamartian

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  1. I personally advocate for professional independence while working as part of a physician led team. The issue seems to be what “physician led” means as some what to micromanage and others are comfortable being available for complex cases or consulting. The professional organizations are putting out statements as a form of protectionism for their own income. EM in particular is really worried about their future job availability and income. The irony to me is what life would be like for many practices/services if PAs were no longer there. We often cover 1st call, fast track, and office so physicians can be available for critical cases or be in surgery. Every time I see a physician threatening to “stop training” PAs I chuckle. They wouldn’t like the trade off.
  2. I started in Uro. Both in inpatient and clinic though no OR. It just wasn’t for me and I’ve transitioned to outpatient IM. Primary care is what I went to school wanting to do and it’s great. The thing I will say is that going to narrow specialty makes transitioning to general medicine a bit more difficult. I have put in a lot of time refreshing things I was taught/tested on but didn’t use in specialty work. Certainly the transition was doable but it was difficult.
  3. Primary Care RAP for....well primary care. Beyond that I also enjoy the Curbsiders Podcast for primary care as well.
  4. I don’t like analogies between the human body and appliances so much. It’s too simplistic. Healthcare systems are complex and involve trade offs. No simple answers! DPC can be great but mostly for the healthy and well off. Patients with multiple comorbidities would really struggles with costs.
  5. Good for patients with the means. This covers no medicine, specialty visits, ER visits, diagnostics, or surgery so they still will need insurance. That combined cost is likely a burden for many.
  6. The president has made some relatively small changes via the executive branch that are improvements. He has not suddenly delivered price transparency but he has likely increased it. Price transparency by itself seems to be viewed by policy experts as heavily limited in practical terms of helping with costs. He repeatedly says his plan gives more people insurance that is both more generous and cheaper. He has not released this plan. He is also pursing the dismantling of the largest expansion in coverage since Medicare was passed without a plan to deal with the fallout. When it comes to highlighting policy wins for this administration I will argue healthcare is not a place to focus. A more persuasive argument would be his record on decreasing both legal and immigration in a substantial way, depending on your point of view here.
  7. It’s very difficult to take another medical professional seriously when they claim a virus that has killed 200k people in our mutual home will stop immediately based solely on a political transition. This logic is of course why we have the response and outcomes we do.
  8. I agree regarding the difference between residency and our role in patient care. We see patients and preferably at maximum capacity, residents have structured learning. Female vs male: it seemed like you said female for a reason but now you won’t clarify. I do understand why but I don’t know if it’s worth making that statement the begin with. It might be generational as well. Boomer physicians work more than millennials. Perhaps the push for more autonomy is split more along generational lines?
  9. I was asking what being a young female with minimal clinical experience compared to a young male with minimal clinical experience might have to do with the push for more autonomy. You are highlighting men generally work more hours than women and that this is preferred by an employer. I don’t disagree.
  10. I do not disagree with this summation with the caveat that I am hoping you will specify what young females vs young males is implying. I believe physicians are nearing 50/50 distribution for M:F. Thanks in advance.
  11. Will physicians refuse to supervise NPs for the required 3 years as push back?
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